[Undergrad] 2016 Medicine Entry Advice Thread

Discussion in 'Medicine Entrance' started by DannyRoo, Jan 14, 2015.

  1. Leaf247

    Leaf247 Member

    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Thank you very much for your advice, it was quite comprehensive. Actually, I think I've read your post before, and it was from there that I initially questioned taking medical science or not. I've decided to keep nursing as my top choice, and my parents are quite fine with it after I had talked to them, but honestly I'm pretty sure they're frustrated by it mainly because they think that taking nursing was a sudden decision (even though it was an option that I had kept since yr 10). Frankly rather than medical science they wish for me to do a degree that's finance related but I have no interest in that so...

    Oh, I attended the interview and I agree, it really was a valuable experience and helped me figure out where I was lacking :) Unfortunately my performance wasn't that great, so I mainly just feel sorry towards my parents after having spent so much money on sending me to workshops and the like. However I'd like to think of this as a valuable lesson, so hopefully I'll be able to perform better next time ^^

    And as Mana had mentioned that you are a nurse, could you possibly give me some insights into what the course (and the job) entails? No one else in my family had been a doctor, and only a very distant relative had been a nurse so I don't actually have a great idea of what it is like (other than looking at the course and searching things online). Like what parts what you consider most difficult etc?
     
  2. Mana

    Mana Intern (UNDS MBBS) Administrator

    Messages:
    4,100
    Likes Received:
    818
    Trophy Points:
    1,337
    Occupation:
    Junior Medical Officer
    Oh good, that's the intended effect of that post.

    I'm glad you got your parents to come around to your point of view. (I would note here that there is no inherent disadvantage for students who do finance who want to then apply for medicine, just that there aren't that many of them who decide to go for such a significant career change part way through their degree.)

    Best of luck with your nursing degree (assuming that decision is final), and perhaps we'll see each other around the hospitals sometime.
     
    LBoG likes this.
  3. LBoG

    LBoG BMedSci/MD-JMP I UoN

    Messages:
    200
    Likes Received:
    157
    Trophy Points:
    43
    I'm not a nurse, I'm currently studying nursing with the hope of studying medicine. I study at UoN so my insights will likely only be valid for that particular degree. The ATAR cut-off is quite low (mid-60s I believe) and as such many people in the degree are not necessarily as studious as those you'd find studying medicine. The nursing theory subjects are fairly mediocre and just very basic (to me, some students seemed to struggle with the concepts) - they revolved around critical thinking, person-centred care, and clinical reasoning (UoN uses the clinical reasoning cycle which you can Google). However, I've only completed first year and can't speak to the difficulty/interest of further years.

    The Human Bioscience subjects were absolutely my favourite, and many students struggled badly with these (having not done much science before). They are very broad and attempt to teach mostly physiology and pathology in very basic ways.

    The clinical experiences at UoN are great - I was able to do a rural placement and found it extremely enjoyable. I loved being in the hospital. However, many students undertake placements at retirement homes.

    I already have an unrelated bachelors degree so I haven't been finding any of the academic stuff difficult, but those who aren't used to studying effectively and aren't dedicated/committed may find they struggle. The required GPA for medicine entry changes depending on the university you're applying to and the amount of the degree you've completed, so it's important to keep those goals in mind. I also didn't find clinical placement difficult, however it could certainly be confronting and stressful to some.

    Working as a nurse in a hospital is something I haven't had experience in. My clinical placement was in a surgical ward and a huge majority of the day was administering medications (charted by doctors), assisting patients to shower and toilet, and making beds. Making so many beds. However I valued the patient interactions and loved the rare opportunities to assist with medical procedures.
     
  4. Mana

    Mana Intern (UNDS MBBS) Administrator

    Messages:
    4,100
    Likes Received:
    818
    Trophy Points:
    1,337
    Occupation:
    Junior Medical Officer
    @Littlebitsofgood - oops - I thought you'd finished that degree!

    To add to Littlebitsofgood's remarks on the difficulty of some subjects - as I'm sure you would have read in my common pitfalls post - nursing isn't particularly competitive because people who do nursing largely aren't people who are trying to get perfect GPAs to get into medicine - the aim is to create *safe* nurses.
    As is such, if you have subjects there that you find easy, scoring a very high GPA will be that much easier, and your pathway to graduate medicine that much more possible.
     
  5. LBoG

    LBoG BMedSci/MD-JMP I UoN

    Messages:
    200
    Likes Received:
    157
    Trophy Points:
    43
    No troubles, I've finished a Bachelor of Teaching and was a teacher.

    And to further Mana's point about GPA possibilities with nursing, as I started my nursing degree with the intention to get the highest GPA I possibly could (for medicine entry), I was able to achieve a GPA of 7 for my first year. However I will say that (at UoN at least) you don't have any choice when it comes to the subjects you study in first year - the program is the same for everyone doing the degree. There's an elective in 3rd year but that's it.
     
  6. Leaf247

    Leaf247 Member

    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    3
    A huge, huge thank you to both of you for all the information provided, they've honestly been so helpful to me ^^ I've put down both the nursing degrees at uts and usyd (with uts being placed higher since I heard they have a better reputation when it comes to nursing), but I'd imagine that certain aspects are similar. The final dates to changing preferences have just finished, so I'm just gonna hope for the very best :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2017
    LBoG likes this.
  7. lovinglife

    lovinglife New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Hi guys,
    First time here so sorry if I'm posting on the wrong thread! :)
    So just yesterday I received a call from the University of Tasmania concerning their Bachelor of Medical Research which could lead to their Medicine degree since I didn't get into their direct entry program. :( Currently, I'm living in Melbourne so I actually applied for the Bachelor of Biomedical Science in Monash University . I've done some research but I'm still quite unsure what is the difference between Medical Research and Biomedical Science. Just in case if I don't get into Medicine, which degree has a better career prospect and is better known throughout Australia ? ( As I am thinking of coming back to Melbourne to work.)

    - PS does anyone know who have done course transfer in University of Tasmania like this?

    Thanks sooo much guys
     
  8. A1

    A1 Certified Admissions Guru Moderator

    Messages:
    1,191
    Likes Received:
    721
    Trophy Points:
    1,337
    Occupation:
    UWA MD minus-III
    Were you just invited or actually offered MedRes? If offered it should come with assured entry to Med on completion in 3 years time. So first ask uTas if they give you a Med-assured offer and second, think whether it's worth doing 8 years of study.
     
  9. B2

    B2 Bond MD I

    Messages:
    237
    Likes Received:
    95
    Trophy Points:
    28
    For now, only the medical research degree offers have come out. I have also received one and followed up on it intensively. The med-assured offers only release in late January so as of current - its best to take a medical research offer as just the medical research degree.
     
  10. HZL

    HZL Member

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Hey guys, I was wondering if there is a website or something that includes ALL the unis in australia that offers dentistry and medicine? Right now I am planning my QTAC preferences and I don't want to miss any unis.

    I am not sure about doing dentistry or medicine, does anyone have advice on putting down preferences? I can apply to any state and don't mind which state I go to.

    Also, does anyone have advice on "backup preferences"? I don't want to do something like biomed... I am actually very interested in starting my own business etc, should I apply for a business degree? Could I still catch up in med school? Would GAMSAT be very hard for me (I am in grade 12, doing chem, phys, maths B, Maths C, no bio...)?

    I am also a big fan of science, especially biology and physics, should i consider a degree in science at all? Lots of people tell me science degrees are "useless" and "can't get you a job", so I really don't know what to do now.

    Thanks for helping guys! :)
     
  11. Mana

    Mana Intern (UNDS MBBS) Administrator

    Messages:
    4,100
    Likes Received:
    818
    Trophy Points:
    1,337
    Occupation:
    Junior Medical Officer
    I suggest not posting the same question in multiple threads and also doing a quick forum search - the answers to your first question are answerable from that and I have already responded to your other questions in another thread.
     
  12. A1

    A1 Certified Admissions Guru Moderator

    Messages:
    1,191
    Likes Received:
    721
    Trophy Points:
    1,337
    Occupation:
    UWA MD minus-III
    QTAC alone won't get you to all the unis. You'll also have to apply via UAC, VTAC, SATAC, TISC (WA) and UTas independently, each one covers all the unis in its state. From these TACs' lists of courses you will see which unis offer Med, Dent, or both.

    For a start see this list for the Med schools
    [Undergrad] - 2016-17 Med schools Selection Criteria Y12s & Non-standards | Med Students Online
     
  13. HZL

    HZL Member

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Would a dual degree undergrad in Business Management/Science be an acceptable undergrad for medicine?

    I just thought that doing a science degree would help me prepare for med studying (and GAMSAT) and also I really like science in genral. For business, I am quite interested and also I have been affected by my dad who has been a businessman his whole life. Sounds bad but true, I'd like to have that business degree so I could help him with his company or even start our own etc. It's also a degree that opens board workforce opportunities.
     
  14. Mana

    Mana Intern (UNDS MBBS) Administrator

    Messages:
    4,100
    Likes Received:
    818
    Trophy Points:
    1,337
    Occupation:
    Junior Medical Officer
    There is plenty of time to study medicine if you get in. Don't choose a degree based on whether it leads to medicine because in all likelihood it won't (unless its a provisional offer like UQ or Flinders etc).

    Instead of asking which undergrad is acceptable for medicine (they all are if your GPA is high enough and they are at least 3 years long) - I would be asking whether the undergrad that you do is acceptable if you never got into medicine (which is the most likely outcome for most). Essentially, if you do a degree for the purposes of getting into medicine and then you don't, you end up in a rather undesirable position 3 years later when you've invested three years worth of time and money and can't use it for something else.

    Business Management is a reasonable degree to do if you wanted to manage a business. It has no bearing on whether you get in (only your GPA does). I know people who have made it into medicine without having done an iota of science in their degrees - there were people with undergraduate degrees in Music, Law, Theology, or Economics in my (graduate entry) cohort. If you were to score well enough in a Business Management degree (i.e. a GPA of almost perfect) then that places you well for graduate entry medicine AND it also opens doors to a business oriented career in the likely eventuality that you don't make it into medicine.

    You don't need to do a science degree to prepare for GAMSAT study. Especially since half of the GAMSAT is not science based (it's more humanities based in section 1 and 2) - you could just as easily do a humanities degree to "prepare" you for the GAMSAT. Furthermore, as stated previously by myself and some others - it's not really knowledge based as much as reasoning based anyway so studying content doesn't help that aspect a great deal.

    If you wanted to do a business degree for the purposes of learning how to do business such as starting your own company, go for it.
    If you want to do science for the purposes of preparing for GAMSAT - I'd suggest you just prepare on your own, you don't need to take out a student loan and attend university classes for the purposes of being able to answer half an exam.
     

Share This Page