Master of Health and Human Services

Discussion in 'Postgraduate Forum' started by LMG, Jan 31, 2017.

  1. LMG

    LMG Regular Member

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    This is perhaps a question better suited to Paging Dr, but I thought I'd give it a run here.

    I have been enrolled part time in a Bachelor of Health (Prof Honours) which is the first two years that leads into a final year qualifying for the Master of Public Health degree, which was my original aim. That course has recently been superseded and is no longer the lead in to the MPH, but is called Bachelor of Health and Human Services (Prof Honours) with an option of a third year leading to Master of Health and Human Services.

    As it currently stands, this degree is kind of interesting but won't really lead to anything in Clinical Psychology, career-advancement wise, or even day to day practice-wise. I really only started doing it because one of the electives was (is) Perinatal and Infant Mental Health, which is an area of Medicine/Allied Health that I'm very interested in. All core units are research, ethics, epidemiology, leadership, supervision etc based, and of much less interest to me, but definitely doable.

    So that's the background. I guess my question is, is a Bachelor of Health and Human Services of any use whatsoever to a prospective/hopeful Med student/doctor? Or would it be more use to try and get back on the MPH path (which is possible, apparently, but one of the units I've already done won't count - ironically, the PIMH unit mentioned above! :facepalm:)? Or neither will be particularly useful but could be interesting? Or something else?

    I'm trying to decide whether to enrol in the final core subject for first year, which is a very dry, leadership theories module which does not really excite me!

    Any practical advice would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. hugh mungus

    hugh mungus Member

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    A masters point scores you usually 1 point for your CV when you apply for speciality, a PHD scores 3. Research papers also score points. If it doesn't fit any of those criteria you really wont gain anything apart from the knowledge and probably unnecessary debt. Unfortunately bachelors degrees don't gain points for any specialities that I know of.
     
  3. LMG

    LMG Regular Member

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    Thanks, Hugh. Luckily, it's not something I've had to pay for or accrue HECS for, as my employer has been funding it. I have a doctorate and am half way through preparing an article for publishing, so it's good to know those are useful. I've requested early exit from the above because it really just wasn't doing it for me. I've completed up to Grad Cert, which is fine.

    Thanks for weighing in :)
     
  4. chinaski

    chinaski Member

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    Not all specialties run on a "points award" system for entry, so YMMV. Be aware that it's becoming increasingly common for people to enrol in these kinds of courses (especially MPHs) as they perceive it as advantageous to have that extra notch in the belt - but the net effect is that they are now fairly ubiquitous entries on many CVs, so are not guaranteed to make you stand out. You'd probably be wise to give some thought to how any extra study would relate to the eventual training pathway you take. Obviously an unrelated degree or qualification seems somewhat erroneous on your CV, whereas related qualifications and publications carry more clout.
     
  5. LMG

    LMG Regular Member

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    Yeah, this is what I've done, hence the decision to request early exit at Grad Cert level. At the moment, my career is Clinical Psychology and I have no interest in management, which is the only promotion stepping stone the above would be useful for. If I get into Med (which is obviously a huge 'if'), I figure I'm going to have much more to worry about for the next x years than trying to finish a MH&HS that I'm not interested in. I've decided to do a specialist supervision course in semester two this year instead (as this is a requirement for providing supervision to Psychology students and those on specialist registration pathways, ie. Clinical), that way, if I don't get into Med, I've got another skill set for my current career, and if I do get into Med, I've got a possible income stream that doesn't rely on being in a consulting room or hospital 9-5. Seems like a wiser move at this stage... Time will tell, I guess.
     
  6. chinaski

    chinaski Member

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    My comment was more in the context of using extra study as a stepping stone in medicine - obviously I am not here to comment on your current career. You would have to consider the relevance any extra qualifications would have to any eventual training pathway you'd want to undertake in medicine. There are currently a lot of junior doctors and students looking at these sorts of pursuits as a way of building their CV, but many don't think about how well the qualification fits with their ambitions. I remember talking to an intern who was reading for an MPH in tropical medicine. Whilst she found it very interesting, and certainly no pursuit of knowledge is a waste of time, her career interests were nothing to do with tropical medicine or public policy, so that particular MPH wasn't really advantageous to have in that respect. I think this is increasingly important as so many people are completing these qualifications today - holding one that is unrelated to the training you want to pursue is of questionable worth when you're being compared to others who have tailored their learning to a greater degree.
     

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