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Non-standard applicant for medicine

Discussion in 'Medicine Entrance' started by MintK, Jan 11, 2017.

  1. MintK

    MintK New Member

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    Hi. I've received 98.65 in 2016 and 65% UMAT.
    I know that I have no chance for medicine at the moment, so I am planning on studying biomedicine at Melbourne Uni in 2017. (I live in Melbourne.)

    What I am thinking of doing-
    1. get a good GPA, re-do UMAT, apply as non-standards in 2017 for both medicine or dentistry. If this fails,
    2. get a good GPA, do GAMSAT, apply post-graduate medicine/dentistry courses over the Australia.

    I was just wondering if this plan seems valid to you- and if I get accepted as a non-standard, would I be starting as a second-year student or starting from the first year in that uni?

    I know you guys don't advocate studying biomedicine or medical sciences, but it feels like my only option at the moment.
     
  2. Mana

    Mana Intern (UNDS MBBS) Administrator

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    Why do you think it is your only option at the moment?

    Other than doing biomedicine/medical science, the above plan is reasonable. However, as it stands, your plan, *with* biomed, is likely to turn out like this:

    year 1: attempt a good GPA, likely score too poorly on UMAT (because the vast majority will), likely fail to get in even if you do well in UMAT (because again the majority will)
    year 2: attempt a good GPA, do UMAT and GAMSAT, likely fail both (because the vast majority will) and then again, likely fail to get in for UMAT (because again the majority will). Can't apply to grad med just yet because you're not finished a degree this year...
    year 3: attempt a good GPA again, do UMAT and GAMSAT again, likely fail both (as this is the case statistically), first shot at grad med, but again most don't get in...
    year 4: you have a useless degree. What now?
     
  3. heart

    heart Member

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    As a biomed grad myself for job opportunities the best major seems like bioengineering, but personally if I could do it all again would have either done commerce (finance or actuary) or a science degree with a major in maths. I majored in biochem which is more research orientated, like most of the majors which lend themselves to less job opportunities.
     
  4. MintK

    MintK New Member

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    My reasoning is that I am planning on doing post-grad medicine at Melbourne/Deakin, and Melbourne Uni only recognises science/ biomedicine/ arts. And for the fourth year, if I fail medicine, I could apply for grad dentistry/ optometry/ pharmacy? Especially because I get a guaranteed entry for grad optometry as long as I get 75% or higher, and I would need to maintain this anyway if I want to have a chance for grad medicine?

    The reason why I was posting this was because I read your post about the common pitfalls and I was confused about what to do. I have my own reasoning, but the future you described seemed too devastating :(
     
  5. Mana

    Mana Intern (UNDS MBBS) Administrator

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    Or, if you were going to do that, you could just do Optometry (or pharmacy... or if you somehow get it, dentistry) as your undergrad and then use that to apply to any number of the medical schools around Australia. Not only that, but you'd have a job as an optometrist without wasting all this time and money studying biomed. There is literally zero reason to ever study biomed if you want medicine.

    75% probably isn't going to cut it for Melbourne - their medicine cutoff has a very high GAMSAT and a GPA of high 6.9's out of 7 to be even considered for interview. Furthermore, you do NOT need to study at Melbourne university as an undergrad to be considered for Melbourne's medical degree - there are quite a few people who studied at other universities who received interviews to Melbourne's MD this year; Melbourne does not set aside any quotas for its own biomed graduates to enter the MD, it's whoever happens to be the most competitive from all around Australia. All you need to have satisfied subject matter wise is the equivalent of second year anatomy, biochemistry and physiology (as per this link Prerequisites — MDHS Study) - and you can fulfill those prerequisites through their Community Access Program if you didn't do them in your degree.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2017
  6. applecider

    applecider Member

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    Hi Mint,
    It's a valid plan which most students who choose to study biomedicine at Melbourne take. If you get accepted as a non-standard you would be starting in first year. Although many students are successful in gaining entrance into medicine/dentistry there are also many who aren't. This is not your only option (see above replies) however if it's what you would like to do then go for it.
     
  7. artsstudent101

    artsstudent101 Member

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    As a current non-standard applicant who just spent a year at Melbourne uni doing basically what you described, except as an arts student with science breadth subjects to fulfil the pre-reqs, I would advice against doing biomed unless there is a specific major within it that you would like to do. Biomed offers no greater assurance of later entrance to grad med, and at the same time is wayyyyy harder to get the good Gpa that is so important for both undergrad and grad med applications. Do what you enjoy/are good at in ur undergrad, and you should probably be able to fit med prerequisites into it at Melbourne, but don't be sucked into the biomed facade simply because of its name and atar cutoff.

    Also re mana's comment, it's absolutely true that it's statistically likely you won't ace the umat or gamsat, but that is true of everyone and I reject the premise that you should make ur decision on the assumption of your worst performance. I chose to do a year of Uni and resit the umat and I improved from 91 to 99, and with an arts/science Gpa of 6.9+ am in a pretty good position, so the pathway is certainly not an invalid option. I would however reiterate his caution about any sort of assumption that you will necessarily improve or ace it next year, and be prepared to work bloody hard for the Uni marks you'll need.

    Good luck
     
  8. Mana

    Mana Intern (UNDS MBBS) Administrator

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    While I largely agree with @artsstudent101's advice, I'm not saying that you should make your decision on the assumption of your worst performance. I am saying that you should make your decision (keeping your options open, mind you) based on the assumption of your most likely performance. If your performance was a 65% in UMAT the first time, then, even if you have a performance increase of twenty percentiles (which is a huge improvement, and which no prep course can attest to achieving consistently) you are still going to not be competitive for medicine.

    Still take the UMAT as to keep your options open as possible, but make your decisions based on the most likely outcome.
     

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