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JCU Not sure about JCU's Letters of Support?

Discussion in 'Medicine Entrance' started by Leaf247, Aug 9, 2017.

  1. Leaf247

    Leaf247 Member

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    I know, it's probably been asked 3000 times but...

    Could someone give me examples of who to get letters of support from? I'm honestly so lost for ideas atm.

    I was thinking maybe one from my local GP (who I've been going to for years now) but I'm not sure if that's a good idea since they need character references and all. That being said, she does know I've been interested in health for a while and after getting into Nursing she occasionally likes to teach me various things whenever my family go for a check up (I like to tag along because of that lol). But like I said, not sure if a good idea.

    But apart from that I have no idea. I don't think I can really ask any of my tutors/lecturers - I doubt they would even recognise my face considering it's a cohort of 850 students. I was wondering if I could go to the manager of this tutoring place where I volunteered at for several months, but it's been more than 2 years so I'm not sure if it's worth it (she still recognises me though, went to visit a few days ago).

    So... yeah. Any ideas?
     
  2. Benjamin

    Benjamin Intern (JCU MBBS) Administrator

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    I've covered it a few times but finding old comments is always a bit hard & most of them have been directed towards school leavers. Certainly for myself my strategy was to get 2 of my high school teachers that knew my ambitions & knew my work ethic + someone who knew me outside of school/work as a character reference.

    I think that's a generally good option - find two people who know how well/hard you work + your ambitions & are willing to give examples in a reference. Then find someone who can vouch for the kind of person you are. Honestly it doesn't really matter that much - IMHO I doubt many applications have been made/broken by their letters of support, i.e. an inadequate written application is very unlikely to be saved even by a letter of support from the director of Medicine at a hospital.

    Don't stress too much if you don't have any - there are certainly a large number of people that get into JCU without letters at all. I hope that helps.
     
    Leaf247 likes this.
  3. Leaf247

    Leaf247 Member

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    Thanks for your reply :) - I'm going to focus on making sure my application is good enough, because like you said, there's no point in stressing out about it if my application itself isn't up to scratch. I'm planning on visiting my high school with a couple of friends soon so hopefully I'll get an opportunity to ask my old teachers there.

    Also if you don't mind, there's a section in the application where it asks us to describe any sort of work or volunteering experiences in addition to our studies that demonstrate our motivation to study medicine. Could you possibly explain to me what sort of examples I could include in there?

    I have done some volunteering experience, and am currently volunteering in a university program where I help out international students with their communication skills but I'm not sure if that's relevant enough. Of course, I also have my experiences from clinical placement, but I'm not sure if it's the best example as it was mainly from a nursing perspective (we observed the rest of the multi-disciplinary team too, but to a much lesser extent). Also it's technically part of my uni coursework, so not sure if they would count it :/
     
  4. Benjamin

    Benjamin Intern (JCU MBBS) Administrator

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    Any discussion about volunteering is worthwhile. I personally talked about how I volunteering about the RSPCA to look after sick animals ; I have no idea how useful that actually was i terms of getting a spot. All you can honestly do is talk about your experiences and how you feel they relate to working as a doctor, the more realistic you are the better & the more it will seem like you actually know what the job is. Bear in mind though that after 6 years of study I still had absolutely no idea what my job would be like, heck I don't even know what my next term will be like. Ideally your work experience examples will play into the description/summary/story you have built through the rest of your answers.. but this is often fairly difficult to actually pull off.
     

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