Bond Bond Medicine: Psychometric Test and Interview Overview

bond99

Member
Hi everyone !

It's amazing to see the amount of current Bond students helping out the future students here ! I have posted on the other threads in regards to Bond's psychometric test and interview process, so I thought I would chip in my 2 cents being a 4th year medical student at Bond (+ having tutored for last 3 years).

Bond Psychometric Test:

In terms of the psychometric test, when you do it, it will be literally common sense. I know there are numerous resources out there which give you hints/tips, but at the end of the day, it's all about gut feeling.

Section 1: Your personality
Let me give you an actual example, the following was a question from the test in my year. "What emotions are induced within you by this picture". The picture was of rocks and water. Now every person interprets this differently.

While this is one type of question, another type of question is a scenario. Where you will be given 3-5 emotions and you have to select on a scale of 1-10 the level that emotion was induced within you due to that scenario.

The most useful tip I can give you is never, never, never fake an answer that is testing your personality. These are the most common questions in this test.

An example of this being "I would rather spend a night alone watching a movie compared to watching it with friends at a cinema". They would then give you a scale out of 10, with 1 being completely agree and 10 being completely disagree. So here they are testing if you are an introvert vs extrovert. Now you may think they love students that interact with people, so you select 7-9, which is that you disagree.

Great, now 5 questions later they may ask the same thing in a different scenario.
Example: "After a long day at work, I like to relax by myself compared to spending time with friends"

Now when I put this side by side, it's quite obvious, but when you are continuously doing questions, you will most likely try to choose answers you believe are ideal/wanted and because of this you will forget to apply that "idealisation of answers" throughout the test, leading to contradictions = lying to the examiners.

Examples (first 6 pages) https://www.researchgate.net/profile/David_Dunaetz/post/How_data_about_Leaders_unethical_behavior_can_be_collected_from_followers_Is_there_any_way_to_approach_followers/attachment/5cdd7027cfe4a7968da060ee/AS:[email protected]/download/MSCEIT+Sample+Emotional+Intelligence.pdf

Section 2 examples - all to do with emotions (similar to UMAT section 2)
1) Dominic is usually quite happy at work and things also go well at home. He thought that he and his co-worker were generally fairly paid and treated well. Today, everyone in his unit received a modest across-the-board pay increase as part of adjustments in salary. Rashard felt _____
  • Surprised and shocked
  • Peaceful and quiet
  • content and elated
  • humbled and guilty
  • proud and dominant

2) Roy's teacher has just called roy's parents to say that roy is doing poorly in school. The teacher tells roy's parents that their son is not paying attention, is being disruptive and can't sit still. This particular teacher does not do well with active boys, and Roy's parents wonder what is really going on. Then the teacher says that their son will be left back unless he improves. The parents feel very angry. How helpful to their son is each of these reaction?

  • Response 1 - parents told the teacher that this was a big shock to them since this was the firs time they had ever heard there was a problem. They ask to meet with the teacher and also requested if the principal could attend the meeting.
    1. Very ineffective
    2. Some what ineffective
    3. Neutral
    4. Some what effective
    5. Very effective

Interviews:

Q1: " 4 or 8 stations + timings of stations + information per station?"
So the interview process has changed recently, it was different in 2018 and then last year in 2019.

In 2018, there was 8 stations, total of 8 questions, 7 minutes each + two minutes rest stop, with pre-reading of the question before entering the interviewers room.

In 2019 and 2020, there was 4 question stations, 1 main question and then 1 follow up question, making it 2 questions per station. 4 rest stations with the same 2 mins pre reading as before.

Q2: "Just wondering what types of questions each of those stations are based on"
In terms of the questions asked, it is based on you as an individual rather than your merit. I have listed certain areas below
  • Teamwork
  • Leadership
  • Ethics and morals (Scenario)
  • General medicine related
  • Dispute resolution (scenario)
  • Dealing with medicine-related stress
  • Integration of life experiences with responses (life/studies) → how has it influenced you to pursue medicine
  • Strengths and weaknesses
  • Regrets and achievements
  • Learning experience
  • Failure
  • Volunteer work/Employment
This is just a list made from previous questions but hopefully you can see that it is more on your past experiences/qualities rather than a specific topic. This can be quite different to other universities, who may have more direct specific questions. An example being JCU, who like asking questions regarding the rural issues faced.

Q3: "Strategies for the interview"

Since you only have 8 mins per station, it is important that you don't go overboard, otherwise the marker, who is also marking the others sitting the interview, will easily get bored. I like to follow the follow template:

Let me give you a common question was "What qualities do you think will make you a good doctor?"

1) Rephrase the question as a statement to confirm with the marker that you have understood it
2) Always stick to the rule of 3: pick 3 qualities that you will talk about
2a) Quality A = keeping an open mind
2b) Give a quick past experience, where you have had to keep an open mind and what that taught you
2c) Now upon reflection, talk about how you would utilise this quality in a healthcare setting.
3) Repeat for other 2 qualities.

I have found this to be a good approach for nearly all questions, as you are not pre-planning any question but instead have a framework to fall back on.


Feel free to reply to this thread if you any more questions !

Kind Regards,
Bond99
 
Last edited by a moderator:

dinuk

Lurker
Hi, thank you so much for sharing all of that information. I was wondering if the Bond Psychometric tests (MSCEIT & 16PF) are both multiple choice format?
Kind regards :)
 
Many thanks for taking time to write this up and share it with us :) I was curious with regards the section 2 questions posed above, what would your choice of answers be to them? Cheers

Hi, thank you so much for sharing all of that information. I was wondering if the Bond Psychometric tests (MSCEIT & 16PF) are both multiple choice format?
Kind regards :)
Also, would you know if both these exams are timed, or is the 1.5hrs instead a rough indication of how long we'd take to complete it?
 
Many thanks for taking time to write this up and share it with us :) I was curious with regards the section 2 questions posed above, what would your choice of answers be to them? Cheers


Also, would you know if both these exams are timed, or is the 1.5hrs instead a rough indication of how long we'd take to complete it?
The exams are timed but they don't assess you based on how long you take to complete them :) There are people in my cohort who answered a few questions then left it until the next day to finish the rest, and there are others who finished it within an hour so don't stress too much about timing, I would say to focus on being honest and just overall being a nice person. The algorithm can detect if you are lying as it skews your data so try to be as truthful as possible :)

Just wanted to clarify that for 2019, from memory, there weren't just two questions per station (one main and one follow up). There was generally an overarching stimulus for the scenario based questions in which after you have read the stimulus (outside the door), the interviewers took turns asking relevant questions (I believe it was 4 questions each station, 2 from each interviewer) and for the more "basic" interview questions such as "why do you want to pursue a career in medicine?", the stimulus was something along the lines of, you will be asked some questions regarding your interests in medicine, the interviewers again took turns asking you two questions each. Hope that helps! Feel free to post questions here if you have any questions or if you would like me to clarify something.

(last sentence edited by moderator to reflect repeated requests for questions to be asked in threads for all to access and for ease of reply, thank you all).
 

Tac

Bond M1
The exams are timed but they don't assess you based on how long you take to complete them :) There are people in my cohort who answered a few questions then left it until the next day to finish the rest, and there are others who finished it within an hour so don't stress too much about timing, I would say to focus on being honest and just overall being a nice person. The algorithm can detect if you are lying as it skews your data so try to be as truthful as possible :)

Just wanted to clarify that for 2019, from memory, there weren't just two questions per station (one main and one follow up). There was generally an overarching stimulus for the scenario based questions in which after you have read the stimulus (outside the door), the interviewers took turns asking relevant questions (I believe it was 4 questions each station, 2 from each interviewer) and for the more "basic" interview questions such as "why do you want to pursue a career in medicine?", the stimulus was something along the lines of, you will be asked some questions regarding your interests in medicine, the interviewers again took turns asking you two questions each. Hope that helps! Feel free to post questions here if you have any questions or if you would like me to clarify something.

(last sentence edited by moderator to reflect repeated requests for questions to be asked in threads for all to access and for ease of reply, thank you all).
Hey there,

Just have a few questions:

1. From your memory, was each station 7 or 8 minutes long? Just curious so I can practice managing my time appropriately

2. I've heard that the first station is about you/the medical program, the second station is role play, and the third and fourth stations are scenario-based. Is this true?

3. Also, is there a rest station before each question station? And during this time do you read the stimulus for the question station?

Thanks so much!
 

ucatboy

MD II
Valued Member
had they indicated that you cannot go backwards in the personality test once you started as that is not fare
I suspect they might be trying to prevent students from changing their answers to questions later on so that they align with each other i.e. "oh no I just realised I shouldn't have selected x for question y because that would conflict with question z". Their rationale is probably "you don't need to change your answers for a personality test, there's no right or wrong".
 
I suspect they might be trying to prevent students from changing their answers to questions later on so that they align with each other i.e. "oh no I just realised I shouldn't have selected x for question y because that would conflict with question z". Their rationale is probably "you don't need to change your answers for a personality test, there's no right or wrong".
yes but the question is that had they indicated before you can go back wards
 

Jangko

Member
The exams are timed but they don't assess you based on how long you take to complete them :) There are people in my cohort who answered a few questions then left it until the next day to finish the rest, and there are others who finished it within an hour so don't stress too much about timing, I would say to focus on being honest and just overall being a nice person. The algorithm can detect if you are lying as it skews your data so try to be as truthful as possible :)

Just wanted to clarify that for 2019, from memory, there weren't just two questions per station (one main and one follow up). There was generally an overarching stimulus for the scenario based questions in which after you have read the stimulus (outside the door), the interviewers took turns asking relevant questions (I believe it was 4 questions each station, 2 from each interviewer) and for the more "basic" interview questions such as "why do you want to pursue a career in medicine?", the stimulus was something along the lines of, you will be asked some questions regarding your interests in medicine, the interviewers again took turns asking you two questions each. Hope that helps! Feel free to post questions here if you have any questions or if you would like me to clarify something.

(last sentence edited by moderator to reflect repeated requests for questions to be asked in threads for all to access and for ease of reply, thank you all).
Well I called up about the timing before the test, and they said it will be used to catch people out and stuff (they doing it this year) So like if it took u to complete 10hrs for both tests, the psychometric group will think u received help and trying to get perfect answers. But like if it took you like 3 hrs to do both, then ur off the hook.
 

attaboy

Member
You can go backwards on the test, and when I say that, I am assuming you mean if you are allowed to go back to previous questions.
I agree with Angela2020, i went back to previous questions in my test and it was fine and appropriate, keenonmedicine can u elaborate on what u mean ?

does anyone know what time offers come out for the interviews on the 19th?
 

Tac

Bond M1
Well I called up about the timing before the test, and they said it will be used to catch people out and stuff (they doing it this year) So like if it took u to complete 10hrs for both tests, the psychometric group will think u received help and trying to get perfect answers. But like if it took you like 3 hrs to do both, then ur off the hook.
Did they actually specify any particular amounts of time? I think they should have told us beforehand. I took my time and probably went over 3 hours...
 

Angela2020

Member
Did they actually specify any particular amounts of time? I think they should have told us beforehand. I took my time and probably went over 3 hours...
I think that’s fine. I’m pretty sure if they see someone who spent like 10+ hours or something for the exams they would be placed on some watch list or their scores would be analysed pretty closely. It wouldn’t be logical or even make any sense to just state someone is cheating because they took 10+ hours.

To be fair, Bond and the provider did recommend that you should spend around 30-40 min for both tests... but look around 3 hours is fine. I’m pretty sure some ppl on the forum spent long as well :) what’s done is done; no point worrying about it now.
 
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