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Can "some" mean all/everything?

feelsbadman

New Member
Hi guys, I haven't been able to determine if "some" can mean all in UMAT. I've found some sources saying it can (in mathematics field/Any value that is non-zero), and some cases saying it doesn't imply all.
Can someone help me clarify this please.
 

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Stuart

Administrator
Admodistrator
Hi there,

This is related to categorical propositions. Categorical propositions assert or deny whether all or some elements of a category are included in other category. There are four types of categorical propositions, and all and some do not mean the same. The idea is stems the field of logic.

Source - me.
 
Last edited:

feelsbadman

New Member
Hi there,

This is related to categorical propositions. Categorical propositions assert or deny whether all or some elements of a category are included in other category. There are four types of categorical propositions, and all and some do not mean the same. The idea is stems the field of logic.

Source - I studied some logic back in the days.
I think I've worded my question slightly wrongly. What I mean to ask is whether "all" is within the subspace of "some". For example.
Say I told my friend to take "some" of my apples, of which I have 8 of.
What are all the possible amounts that my friend can take? Can it be 1 or 2 .... or 8 (all)?
 

Mana

Registrar
Admodistrator
As far as I understand the term, if you were to take "some", this means you are taking a non-zero value, including the value of "all".
 

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frootloop

House Surgeon
Moderator
It sort of implies a non-zero value which is lower than 'all' (because otherwise you'd just say 'all' to prevent any confusion). To me it actually implies <50%, or you'd just say 'most'.

Like, if I said 'some ginger boys are actually pretty hot', it's pretty heavily implying that some (or even the majority) are not.

But as the two above have pointed out, I suppose there's theoretically no reason why it couldn't be used to mean 'any non-zero value'.
 

Stuart

Administrator
Admodistrator
I think I've worded my question slightly wrongly. What I mean to ask is whether "all" is within the subspace of "some". For example.
Say I told my friend to take "some" of my apples, of which I have 8 of.
What are all the possible amounts that my friend can take? Can it be 1 or 2 .... or 8 (all)?
Hi,

If you are talking about mathematics, especially the real numbers, you can have a non-empty set, then your subset can be the set itself (I think this is called a non-proper set). It's also possible to have a set with zero elements. This is probably getting into the realm of set theories. For the purpose of UMAT, I wouldn't read too much into it because it will get confusing and irrelevant very quickly.

For this particular case of yours, "some" is a positive real number which is an undisclosed quantity. That is, given a set of all positive real numbers, "some" is the non-zero subset of the set. In context, your friend may take anything from one to eight apples.

Source - me.
 

frootloop

House Surgeon
Moderator
Surely 'some' is only ever going to be a UMAT term for S1/S2 questions?

In which case it'd be pretty rude of them to penalize you for making the assumption that they were using language succinctly and clearly.
 

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