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Cardiovascular System Questions

asdfw

Lurker
1. Is flow in systemic capillaries pulsatile and why?
2. What are the situations in which we experience pulsation?
3. Is the flow pulsatile in pulmonary capillaries and Why?

Can anyone answer me these question? thank you very much!
 

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govpop

Regular Member
1. Is flow in systemic capillaries pulsatile and why?
2. What are the situations in which we experience pulsation?
3. Is the flow pulsatile in pulmonary capillaries and Why?

Can anyone answer me these question? thank you very much!
Why don’t you put down your thoughts, then people can respond, rather than just doing your homework for you?
 

asdfw

Lurker
Right. I think both systemic and pulmonary capillary is in pulsatile action because they have smooth muscle at the arteriole end to modulate the blood flow. Am I correct?
 

govpop

Regular Member
Right. I think both systemic and pulmonary capillary is in pulsatile action because they have smooth muscle at the arteriole end to modulate the blood flow. Am I correct?
Yeah kind of. Both circulations have compliant large vessels which absorb some of the pulsatility. However the resistance in the small systemic vessels is much higher, and this in combination reduces capillary flow to near constant. However in high cardiac output states and atherosclerotic disease, pulsatility can be restored again.

In contrast, the pulmonary circulation is much lower resistance and the small vessels in themselves are quite compliant so capillary flow remains pulsatile. In fact there are capillary beds at the apex of the lung which are collapsed in diastole and recruited in systole.
 

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asdfw

Lurker
Yeah kind of. Both circulations have compliant large vessels which absorb some of the pulsatility. However the resistance in the small systemic vessels is much higher, and this in combination reduces capillary flow to near constant. However in high cardiac output states and atherosclerotic disease, pulsatility can be restored again.

In contrast, the pulmonary circulation is much lower resistance and the small vessels in themselves are quite compliant so capillary flow remains pulsatile. In fact there are capillary beds at the apex of the lung which are collapsed in diastole and recruited in systole.
thank you!
 

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