JCU Chances of JCU Dent?

Discussion in 'James Cook University' started by Acing, Dec 22, 2017.

  1. Acing

    Acing New Member

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    Hi everyone,

    I got an ATAR of 99.65 and am from Sydney. Assuming I managed a half-decent application, do I have a chance of getting into JCU Dent? I've got no special considerations.

    Thank you!
     
  2. Niko99

    Niko99 New Member

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    Quite high since your ATAR is high, but it all boils down mainly to your written application.
     
  3. skm2000

    skm2000 New Member

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    Sorry for stealing this thread.

    Hi Everyone,

    I am a WA non-rural school leaver applicant. My actual atar is 98.55. Being called for an interview for the JCU medicine program, I feel that my written application was strong(which was tailored for both med and dent at jcu, no particular bias towards one course). What is the typical atar requirement for someone with a strong written application and from a non-rural background? Is my atar on the lower side for JCU dentistry?
     
  4. LMG!

    LMG! UTAS MBBS I Moderator

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    Last year, here at MSO, there were three reported JCU MED offers for applicants in the 98.+ region. 98.60 got an unbonded offer. 98.30 and 98.10 also got offers (though unsure of offer type). Academically, you’re competitive for Med. I’d assume you’d also be competitive for Dent, but I’m not sure we’ve got much offer data.
     
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  5. A1

    A1 Certified Admissions Guru Moderator

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    Considering place ratio is 1 in 4 and 98.55 is minority relative to the 99s, a good performance is enough if the large majority of interviewees did less than good. That is unlikely so I'd say you need a fair bit more than good. But why worry about it now, nothing you can do to change so just wait for the offer round, who knows the interviewers might have given you an outstanding mark.
     
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  6. Leroetron

    Leroetron New Member

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    Hi
    Could you advise me what experience do I need to have a strong written component and it is very hard to have work experience in health related area?
    Thanks
     
  7. Mana

    Mana Resident Medical Officer (UNDS MBBS) Administrar

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    Here are some things that will strongly improve the written component for your application to JCU:
    1. Having lived a large proportion of your life (~4+ years) in a rural or remote location
    2. Having had a reasonable period (i.e. at least ~1 month+) of firsthand experience with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander healthcare (generally also in the rural or remote setting)
    3. Having had a reasonable period (i.e. at least ~1 month+) firsthand experience working in the tropical medicine healthcare setting
    4. Being of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander background
     
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  8. Mana

    Mana Resident Medical Officer (UNDS MBBS) Administrar

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    This, like for JCU medicine, is highly dependent on two things:

    1. How strong your application is, and
    2. How high your ATAR is.

    Given the demand for JCU dentistry (and the lack of requirement of UMAT for it), you're going to have to have an absolutely stellar application to get admission if you manage to get an ATAR of 95.

    If your ATAR is much lower than that, you are probably going to have to consider either doing the UMAT (and getting into other dentistry programs - notably all of which would require at least a similar ATAR), or doing graduate entry dentistry (through the GAMSAT pathway or using a degree's marks to apply as a non-standard Dentistry applicant), or choosing a different career.
     
  9. Mana

    Mana Resident Medical Officer (UNDS MBBS) Administrar

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    Then you may want to reconsider your career choice. If you are too busy to pursue opportunities to get into dentistry, of which the UMAT is easily the method which opens up the most opportunities, then, you are probably too busy to study dentistry in the first place.

    The UMAT is a three hour test. Studying dentistry is a five year, full time degree. If you can't set aside three hours for a test to get in, you definitely, definitely can't set aside five years to study dentistry.
     
  10. Logic

    Logic Medical Student

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    You don't need any knowledge for UMAT, and also it's quite arguable that studying for it can help you do better. It's more of a test of innate ability. I strongly suggest you give it a go if you're able to. I know people who have studied for it for months and failed while others just went in and did well. Not doing it, restricts where you're able to apply.
     
  11. Mana

    Mana Resident Medical Officer (UNDS MBBS) Administrar

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    Some people do zero study for the UMAT and still get 100%ile. The nature of the test is that it is meant to be an exam that you can't study for - i.e. it's a test that attempts to test your intrinsic ability, rather than your ability to study.
     
  12. Mana

    Mana Resident Medical Officer (UNDS MBBS) Administrar

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    If you are so confident about this, then you can just take the UMAT and then take the UMAT again in the next year when you have had the extra year here - there is no limit on how many times you can take it.
     
  13. Mana

    Mana Resident Medical Officer (UNDS MBBS) Administrar

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    The way the UMAT works is that it often offsets the required ATAR to get in. Since James Cook doesn't use the UMAT, the requisite ATAR to get in is quite high - whereas for Adelaide University, there is only an ATAR cutoff (which is around the low 90's) after which the interview (and UMAT) is used for admission.

    That said, you're probably right - certainly the metropolitan dental schools (or rather the ones in capital cities) have higher demand for them than the more regional ones.
     
  14. Mana

    Mana Resident Medical Officer (UNDS MBBS) Administrar

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    If dentistry is your preferred career, then you'll likely find that there is no real advantage to repeating year 12 - you can commence a university degree and then use the marks from one year to apply to dental school. In terms of marks at uni, it's generally thought that it is easier to get a high equivalent GPA than it is to get the same ATAR. Furthermore, all undergraduate dental schools in Australia will consider you using university marks if you have them.
     
  15. A1

    A1 Certified Admissions Guru Moderator

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    If you are confident of your study ability do a year of uni get all HDs for GPA 7 you should get an offer for Griffith Dent, no Umat no interview.

    A downside is its $55k/year fee for the last 2 Masters years. Assuming you are eligible for HECS you can put this $110k on FEE-HELP loan and repay gradually after you start earning an income.
     
  16. Mana

    Mana Resident Medical Officer (UNDS MBBS) Administrar

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    As someone who has done both the UMAT and the GAMSAT (and scored well on both) I think they are pretty similar in difficulty.
     
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  17. LMG!

    LMG! UTAS MBBS I Moderator

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    Some Universities accept this kind of disadvantage as part of their equities scheme. I believe you would need to make your application/s through QTAC, VTAC, UAC, etc, not to the schools directly. Also, not all Universities use the equities schemes in the same way or apply them to applications for Medicine, but I'm not super well-versed on who does what, so your best bet would be to look at the equities information sections of the guides for each TAC.
     
  18. Mana

    Mana Resident Medical Officer (UNDS MBBS) Administrar

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    JCU is not responsible for any adjustments to your ATAR as a result of your VCE for the purposes of their selection criteria. If you are able to gain points to your final VCE score before you receive your ATAR, that will be the score that JCU will use for application purposes.

    Basically, JCU just uses the marks that are given to them by QTAC which are given to them in turn by the VCAA. You have to convince the VCAA or QTAC to give extra marks to your ATAR (which is very difficult to qualify with a doctor's letter and definitely doesn't fit in any of the EAS schemes listed on the QTAC website: Educational Access Scheme - QTAC ).

    As per the JCU website at Selection process you will find that JCU's access for disadvantaged students is managed by QTAC - JCU does not do any of this by itself.

    (Also, your attachment is a screenshot of the quotes for the reply you were about to send.)
     
  19. Mana

    Mana Resident Medical Officer (UNDS MBBS) Administrar

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    Yes, but you should do a degree on its own merits, rather than for the sake of getting into medicine or dentistry, because the vast majority of people who attempt to do this will not get in.
     
  20. Mana

    Mana Resident Medical Officer (UNDS MBBS) Administrar

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    The reply to this was moved to the other thread, which I have responded to at Quick Questions Thread: 2018
     

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