Clinical clothes :| ?

Discussion in 'Tasmania' started by Kay4, Jan 24, 2011.

  1. Havox

    Havox Sword and Martini Guy! Emeritus

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    :cry:

    Agreed, black is the way to go :D

    I do have a largish collection of pastel coloured shirts though which mixes stuff up quite a bit, speaking of inappropriate dress the UWS interviews this year had some shockers.

    Just like to add that I rarely if ever wear ties to clinic and I don't think anyone has ever asked me to wear one. None of my tutors have ever worn one either and I've had quite a few tutors.
     
  2. Matt

    Matt Emeritus MSO Staff Emeritus

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    My god do you see some shockers during interviews. Personally I blame the parents.
     
  3. Shizzy

    Shizzy Administrator Administrar

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    Perhaps some guys and girls should post some pics of them in their swish clinical clothes. You know, to help the newbies.

    Plus, eye candy.
     
  4. Matt

    Matt Emeritus MSO Staff Emeritus

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    Careful, Shizzy. You'll be getting requests to bring back the MSO Photo album before long!
     
  5. Havox

    Havox Sword and Martini Guy! Emeritus

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    Speaking of which... :p
     
  6. Matt

    Matt Emeritus MSO Staff Emeritus

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    I'm imagining captioned pictures of senior MSO members in their clinical clothes similar to some of the comics here.
     
  7. chinaski

    chinaski Regular Member

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    "The Skank", "The Slob" and "The Wannabe Consultant" :)
     
  8. Matt

    Matt Emeritus MSO Staff Emeritus

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    Instructive for newbies, no? The current crop of threads clearly indicate a need for information.
     
  9. chinaski

    chinaski Regular Member

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    Google Image search is calling... :p
     
  10. Havox

    Havox Sword and Martini Guy! Emeritus

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    I'm identifying very much with "The-Twelve-Year-Old" (yy)
     
  11. chinaski

    chinaski Regular Member

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    That might explain the penchant for cartoon print ties... ;)
     
  12. Havox

    Havox Sword and Martini Guy! Emeritus

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    And also the growing collection of novelty T-Shirts :lol:
     
  13. Jjub

    Jjub Regular Member

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    Hey Guys... just looking for someone else's opinion here... I LOVE Camper shoes... they are so comfortable and generally look okay in terms of professionalism... BUT they went and changed the design slightly this year and made them a little more casual with writing on the side. Admittedly, the writing is mostly covered by my pant cuffs... do you think I could get away with wearing these along with nice dark navy chinos (and a shirt/tie) for clinical sessions?

    http://www.campershoes.com.au/summer/shoe_18304-002.html

    I just found them on sale where I am on holidays at the moment.. and they are half what they cost in Aus... will probably buy them for non clinical use anyway... but let me know what you think...
     
  14. JeremiahGreenspoon

    JeremiahGreenspoon Regular Member

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    I know of one registrar at Gosford hospital who wears them every shift!
    And I wear mine to work in the office every day. Mmm so soft and comfy.
    They are slighly more formal (without the sneaker style stripes) though.
     
  15. NoobyMcNooberton

    NoobyMcNooberton Regular Member

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    Sounds like the head of ICU at a certain hospital, how she does it in stilettos i will never know....lol
     
  16. sainteced

    sainteced Regular Member

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    Forgive me if this sounds naive, but I don't understand the rational of wearing ties in a clinical setting. The whole nature of clinical is physical assessment which is what med students/doctors generally do. A tie would just get in the way of procedures, and even coupled with a tie clip would add extra expense for the sake of adding a some 'professionalism'. Another point raised is infection control, might as well do without a tie and the risk? Hence the are two negatives against one positive, a weak one in my opinion. Maybe I am too inexperienced to grasp the true value of a tie in "professionalism" ?
    Isn't dressing conservatively enough? or are doctors mean't to reflect the conservative nature of the Romantics? at the expense of logic?
     
  17. chinaski

    chinaski Regular Member

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    I find it difficult to understand why people would struggle with the idea of a tie being a part of conservative, professional attire for men. It's a very predictable, very well and long established fashion. Sure, you mightn't see many tie-wearing teenagers, but look at the professional world of twenty-somethings and above - the trend is there, and it's not going away in a hurry. The infection control issue has been discussed elsewhere; the same theoretical risk applies to any clothing item.
     
  18. vitualis

    vitualis New Member

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    I agree.

    It's been a basic part of the "professional uniform" for men for decades.

    Sure, you can look professional without a tie. However, not everyone can pull that off and a lot of medical students don't. A lot of medical students look barely professional even in shirt, tie and pants. IMHO, you should wear a tie unless someone tells you to take it off, or, you learn that the tone of the workplace doesn't require it. As per chinaski, the infection control issue is overplayed. For those situations where infection is a serious concern, you need to gown and glove.

    Regards.
     
  19. platonically yours

    platonically yours go to HAL

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    Way to dig up threads of the past, I know, but fun clinical times are approaching and I feel almost as intimidated and detail-freak as I was starting uni! :D A couple of noob questions:

    1. Skirts/dresses. I have a couple of formal midi skirts (calf level) that I bought with "professional friendly" in mind. The more I think about it however, the more I question how functional they would be to have on when performing various procedures. Can someone weigh in with their experience with skirts on wards?

    2. By "closed toe" shoes, do hospitals mean no toes visible (eg. flats) or shoes covering the entire dorsal aspect of the foot? I know it was the former in preclin but it can't hurt to double check!

    3. I obviously spent too many years at a conservative high school to have to confirm this now - are exposed shoulders and arms too much skin or acceptable in a 21st century workplace?

    I'll definitely get a better grasp for what's expected when I start but I'd prefer to get this out of the way now instead of rushing out to get things during semester. (Also, obligatory "sorry I have to ask this halfway through the degree, yes I thought I'd have it sorted by now too").
     
  20. chinaski

    chinaski Regular Member

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    If you can do normal things like sit, squat and bend in a skirt without it riding up to show your underwear or bursting at the seams, it will be fine. Obviously a tight pencil skirt which tethers your knees together and doesn't allow you a free range of movement would be a problem, but most midi skirts aren't that extreme. The bigger issue with skirts that we see on the wards are too-short hems, rather than cuts being too restrictive per se.

    OH&S no doubt want as much of the foot covered as possible, but in practice, ballet flats are fine. And yes, toes covered.

    Cover your shoulders, always. Sleeveless tops are OK so long as they cover your shoulders and aren't low cut (i.e. no spaghetti straps, racerback tanks or anything that cuts into the shoulder area to expose skin, and you should never be able to see a bra from the side).
     

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