Counselling/Mental Illness

Discussion in 'Studying Medicine' started by nona, Mar 10, 2019.

  1. nona

    nona New Member

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    First year here, been told throughout 0-week the uni counselling services are free to use and that we should reach out for support when we’re stressed/etc.. (monash btw)

    Would being diagnosed with depression or any other mental illnesses (not even necessarily a diagnosis, but any signs of worrying behaviour/thoughts) jeopardise your place in med/cause other complications? If so, would it be the same case if you were to see a counsellor outside of uni ($$)?

    Appreciate any advice/disc, thanks
     
  2. rustyedges

    rustyedges Otago MB ChB Moderator

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    If you feel stressed and you think talking to someone will help, definitely go. Plenty of people use the services, they will keep whatever you say confidential, and it's good to be proactive about mental health if things do get really stressful.

    The only way it may jeopardise your place was if they thought you were at serious risk of hurting people.
     
  3. MD

    MD Emeritus MSO Staff Emeritus

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  4. Benjamin

    Benjamin Admin (JCU MBBS) Emeritus

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    Being diagnosed with depression during medical school and seeking help for it would be far less detrimental than having untreated depression that you aren't coping with. As has been mentioned by MD & Rustyedges there are mandatory notification rules which often present a barrier to seeking help -- there is very little chance that you would be reported to AHPRA for seeking help with depression & the psychologist / therapist at your university is bound by the same confidentiality laws as everyone else in the field.

    I've previously trawled through the documented AHPRA cases relating to mental illness (they're published online somewhere in the AHPRA website) & of those that actually result in action from AHPRA the vast majority are for drug related mental illness or psychosis... I think this is in part because a lot of doctors with depression tend to withdraw themselves from the job voluntarily rather than get pushed out by AHPRA.

    Other bits of useful information - all GP's have the ability to write "mental health care plans" which allow you to see a psychologist for free for 6 sessions. This can then be further renewed for an additional 4 sessions in a year. That allows you to see someone external to the uni up to 10 times at no cost.
     

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