Diabetes insipidus

Discussion in 'Assignments' started by Uzayr, Mar 2, 2019.

  1. Uzayr

    Uzayr New Member

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    Good day,

    Anyone know of any biochemical tests for diabetes insipidus (central), bedsides water deprivation?

    Thanks
     
  2. govpop

    govpop Regular Member

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    What is the main problem in DI and how do you think this would affect the serum biochemistry?
     
  3. Uzayr

    Uzayr New Member

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    Main problem is failure to retain water, thus resulting in loss of hypotonic fluid. Serum sodium would increase. However, in the case a blood test was already done which showed hypernatremia.
     
  4. govpop

    govpop Regular Member

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    And the urine biochemistry?
     
  5. Uzayr

    Uzayr New Member

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    Urine biochemistry was all normal as well. pH of 6, urea, creatinine well within normal limits. Patient presented with polyuria, nocturia and body weakness. Urine was also negative for glucose
     
  6. Uzayr

    Uzayr New Member

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    The only thing that is of concern is the high specific gravity of 1.039, which I would have expected to be much lower than that in DI, however, it is probably high due to dehydration
     
  7. govpop

    govpop Regular Member

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    You're right, that doesn't make sense.

    Is there a test you can do in both serum and urine that might clarify things?
     
  8. Uzayr

    Uzayr New Member

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    Not entirely sure of what test we may use at this point. A water deprivation test was conducted in the case, which showed urine osmolality increasing and plasma osmolality increasing when desmopressin was administered.
     
  9. govpop

    govpop Regular Member

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    plasma and urine osmolarity is what I was referring to. There's nothing else.
     
  10. Uzayr

    Uzayr New Member

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    My only thought was that when we calculated specific gravity, we had to add 0.01 for every three degrees above 18. The temperature we got was 29. Had it been higher or lower the sg would also change. Is the sg not then high because of temperature?
     

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