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Edema and hydrostatic pressure

Hi, I'm currently studying Robbins basic pathology, and I'm confused about a certain occurrence. It states in the book that when hydrostatic pressure is low due to lack of albumin synthesis, it leads to a net movement of fluid into the interstitial spaces, however to me that doesn't make any sense, isn't the hydrostatic pressure the thing that facilitates the net movement of particles across the capillaries, so if there is a lack of it, shouldn't the particles not move across the membrane? Any help appreciated
 

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MD

Emeritus Staff
Emeritus Staff
It is likely referring to a low oncotic pressure when albumin is low
 
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Perplex

Emeritus Staff
Emeritus Staff
Yep, I think the book is referring to oncotic pressure there, with a reduction in albumin triggering fluid shifts into the interstitial space. With regards to hydrostatic pressure - filtering out into the interstitial space is favoured at the arterial end, whereas resorption is favoured at the venule/venous end of the network. In the case of conditions like HF, there is venous congestion, resulting in a net increase of venous/venule hydrostatic pressure which favours retention of fluid in the interstitial space (reduction of pressure gradient). That's my understanding at least.

This is a good website I'd recommend reading. Starling Forces | Pathway Medicine
 

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