Graduate Entry from Engineering - First Year Papers

Discussion in 'Graduate Category' started by Vexthebesk, May 16, 2019 at 11:05 PM.

  1. Vexthebesk

    Vexthebesk New Member

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    Hi all,

    I'm applying for graduate entry after a engineering degree I did at UoA (Civil & Environmental).

    Now the environmental engineering pathway made us take a whole bunch of papers involving applied organic chemistry and some cellular microbiology. On top of that, in first year engineering everyone takes ENGGENG140 - Engineering Biology and Chemistry.

    So if my application is successful, I'm really hoping on skipping 2 out of the 4 core papers (leaving pophealth and organ systems). I understand I won't have the opportunity to show how those papers can cross off a lot of the chem/bio FY core papers and that the admissions board or similar would make that decision?

    Can anyone weigh in on this? Anyone else applying through engineering or know someone who has? What about other degrees that weren't relevant to bio/chem - what FY papers did they have to do?

    Thanks!
     
  2. WellyOnAGoodDay

    WellyOnAGoodDay MBChB II 2019

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    If you're applying postgrad you don't have to first year. They send you an email with recommendations on what to learn over summer but there's no formal way you have to prove you have a similar knowledge to undergrads.
     
  3. frootloop

    frootloop House Surgeon Moderator

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    Really? Is that a new policy at UoA or something? Because both unis at least used to hold pretty strongly to the idea that if it's entry to *second* year, one must first have completed first year.

    I can't imagine it'd actually be that hard to pick it all up - calling the NZ entry years 'first year med' is pretty dicey - but still, significant change in tune
     
  4. WellyOnAGoodDay

    WellyOnAGoodDay MBChB II 2019

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    it was labelled preparation advice for 'non science graduates.' basically they said they assumed knowledge of courses from first year and that if you don't have this then you should do additional personal study before the course starts in february.

    no idea how long they've done that for but that's what they sent out to everyone.
     
  5. frootloop

    frootloop House Surgeon Moderator

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    Huh, maybe it's always been like that, and we just all assumed they'd actually check whether or not you'd done it. I mean, Otago are definitely very anally retentive over it, but I'm fairly confident that's just so they can bill people for the HSFY course fees
     
  6. Vexthebesk

    Vexthebesk New Member

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    Thanks for the reply - when was this sent out specifically? I see you're 2019 II so I assume this year?

    This has definitely given me more motivation to smash the UCATs - not getting any younger here.
     
  7. Vexthebesk

    Vexthebesk New Member

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    And also should I ask what did you do for undergrad? Thanks!
     
  8. WellyOnAGoodDay

    WellyOnAGoodDay MBChB II 2019

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    Basically you apply with your graduate degree, and if you get in, you directly enter into MBChB II. When I say I am an undergrad I mean that I did the first year of BSc Biomedical Science, and then used those grades to apply for entry into the medical school. That's what all high school leavers do who are trying to get into med. Those who don't get in after first year biomed tend to do a full BSc and then apply again under the postgrad route. There are two options for you. If your bachelors is recent enough, you should be able to apply through the post grad route. Otherwise, since you don't have a BSc in something related to biology that much, you would be able probably to do the first year biomed entry pathway. That would mean you'd do the pathway that all the people who get in through undergrad do. The reason some people do this is because a) if they're a non-bio grad AND they think their GPA is too low to get into med school through post grad entry or b) their bachelors is from too long ago to be able to apply for post grad.
     

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