Graduate Entry Medicine Advice Requests

AJ

Member
FYI people that have low 70 gamsats this year have been waitlisted for usyd. For some reason they are taking a liking to students with high section 2 scores (perhaps there are some studies / correlations to suggest performance).
If you are wanting to widen your chances you could consider a postgraduate certification from flinders.. non flinders gamsat cut off this year was ~75. Also, UQ requires prerequisites starting from next year so make sure you have a check of them before making any decisions.
 

gr8

Member
Hi everyone, very new to the whole GAMSAT thing. I was having a look at the USYD postgrad admissions requirement page and there was something that didn't quite make sense to me.... When it says,
'Have you completed (or will you complete) at least 2 years of full-time study (or equivalent) of your bachelor’s degree (pass or honours) at the awarding institution?** '
what do they mean by awarding institution? Do they mean USYD (cuz they'll be awarding the postgrad place) or do they mean UNSW (where I will get my bachelors next year)? Sorry if this is a really stupid question :(
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Crow

Medical Student
Emeritus Staff
Hi everyone, very new to the whole GAMSAT thing. I was having a look at the USYD postgrad admissions requirement page and there was something that didn't quite make sense to me.... When it says,
'Have you completed (or will you complete) at least 2 years of full-time study (or equivalent) of your bachelor’s degree (pass or honours) at the awarding institution?** '
what do they mean by awarding institution? Do they mean USYD (cuz they'll be awarding the postgrad place) or do they mean UNSW (where I will get my bachelors next year)? Sorry if this is a really stupid question :(
View attachment 4132
In your case, UNSW is the awarding institution as they’re the uni you will receive your degree from.
 
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Hi, I am just wondering if I could get some advice regarding studies for next year. So I received a full offer for the Master of Nursing at Usyd today (surprised because I thought I bombed the interview). I've received a lot of mixed advice though from people suggesting that honours will be more beneficial for med applications as it'll boost my GPA, whereas postgrad will be harder to do well. I am aiming for Usyd and they have a hurdle GPA cut-off so I'm not sure if it'll matter too much though?

The more I think and read into nursing, the more eager I am to do it though. It's a 2-year program then after that I could sit an exam then go work in the UK or do a grad role here, which all seems very exciting. Also spoke to a cosmetic doctor today that said he did nursing prior to med and so did his son (not to be superstitious but feel like maybe that's a sign?!).

In contrast, honours is 1 year and I've heard that it's weighted more so a H1 can really help. Plus they're phasing out the psych internship (4+2) pathway in 2022 - so if I do hons next year, I can start working immediately after via internship route, otherwise, I'd have to do 5+1 pathway.

What do you think Mana and LMG! ?
 

Mana

there are no stupid questions, only people
Administrator
I don't understand the argument that any specific degree will boost your marks. It's possible to get a perfect GPA in any course so I would be wary of choosing any course because "it will give you good marks for the next one" (i.e. choosing a degree based on its own merit rather than choosing it based on the marks that you can get in it that could get you into the next degree).

In terms of doing honours and thus having your last three undergraduate years counted towards the GPA (i.e. honours + the last 2 years) this is highly dependent on what your existing GPA is already PLUS what the honours year will give you career wise assuming you never get into medicine. Basically, if there is no use for the honours anywhere else if you knew you were never getting into medicine, then I wouldn't be doing the honours (looking at this from a strictly career progression perspective.)
 
I don't understand the argument that any specific degree will boost your marks. It's possible to get a perfect GPA in any course so I would be wary of choosing any course because "it will give you good marks for the next one" (i.e. choosing a degree based on its own merit rather than choosing it based on the marks that you can get in it that could get you into the next degree).

In terms of doing honours and thus having your last three undergraduate years counted towards the GPA (i.e. honours + the last 2 years) this is highly dependent on what your existing GPA is already PLUS what the honours year will give you career wise assuming you never get into medicine. Basically, if there is no use for the honours anywhere else if you knew you were never getting into medicine, then I wouldn't be doing the honours (looking at this from a strictly career progression perspective.)

My GPA is 3.62/4.0. I think with hons, most students do achieve a H1 and especially at this particular uni where I know students get a lot of support and guidance. A H1 would be treated as 7.0 at UQ and I'm not too sure how much it'll increase GEMSAS gpa calculation but I expect it to just bring me above the cut-off so open up more options. If I don't get into med: After hons, I would hopefully start working/pick up an internship via 4+2 pathway in psych, which they will phase out around mid-2022 so need to register before then. It'll also open up the doors to postgrad studies in psych (tbh I'm not terribly keen though), or I can then start the masters nursing after that one year (defer offer now).

The 1 year I spend doing honours could be spent completing 1/2 a nursing degree. If I don't get into med: After the nursing masters, I would go straight into the workforce. I'd either apply for a grad job (2 years) in Sydney or sit an exam then go over to the UK to work for 1-2 years. Realistically, I don't think I'll get a perfect GPA in the nursing program and will be looking at maybe distinction so worried this will WORSEN my chances of ever doing med. The cut-off for a HD is also higher at Usyd (85) compared to unis in Melb (80) (and I have been in situations where I just missed it with low 80s and even 84 in Sydney). I think I would get more out of the nursing degree though (clinical placements) and it'll help me in terms of building attributes/skills that will show/benefit me in interviews.

It's tricky. I don't know if I should be thinking in terms of it's just sacrificing one year (hons) or if it would be setting me back yet another one year? I am actually quite eager to start real work :-/
 
Where did you get this info from? Australia-wide it’s definitely not the case. Getting first class is no walk in the park and requires a lot of time and effort.

I remember seeing Honours graduation university newsletter or some document online where they reported the honours class next to the graduates. Majority got H1 but there were some who got H2A. I think in psych though, the ones who get into honours tend to be 70-100 out of 700-1000 original undergrad cohort so usually, those students take it seriously and do try, and will get H1.
 

LMG!

MBBS IV
Administrator
I remember seeing Honours graduation university newsletter or some document online where they reported the honours class next to the graduates. Majority got H1 but there were some who got H2A. I think in psych though, the ones who get into honours tend to be 70-100 out of 700-1000 original undergrad cohort so usually, those students take it seriously and do try, and will get H1.

The other factor with psych honours is that the absolute vast majority are using it to get into post graduate degrees, and you typically need H1 for that, these days. I’ve not looked at the stats for those who achieve H1, but I can confirm that my psych honours year was the most stressful and competitive I’ve ever experienced (including a doctorate and three years of Med completed since).

It is definitely not something to be entered into lightly because those H1s come at a pretty high price, in my experience.

I think the key question is (leaving aside the obvious): do you want to be a nurse or do you want to be a psychologist?

And my next question is; do you have an honours offer? Or just hoping for one?
 
In terms of a job now or in the near future, I think nursing would be really, really exciting. I would love to work in hospitals, rotate around different wards (excited about paeds and perioperative), and I like the possibility of going overseas/MSF. Also, it's really quick. 2 more years of study and I can start working if I don't get into med. In terms of long-term career though, I'd be more inclined to do neuropsych but I know how competitive it is to gain admission to postgrad (~10 spots per year) so it'll probably be a while before I can actually start working. Plus I think psych needs commitment in itself and right now, I'm more interested in trying to gain experience that's healthcare-related (eg. phlebotomy/pathology collection but hoping to find an assistant in nursing role).

I do have an honours offer already for a university in Melbourne (Deakin). I've applied broadly though (with the exception of Monash because of the neg experience/Faculty issues previously). The outcomes for other universities won't come out until say Dec/Jan. My family are actually in Melbourne so I would have support down there and could focus more on my studies/wouldn't need to work.
 

Hanna.S

Member
Hey, idk if this is the right place for it but I feel like I really bombed the jmp interview and unfortunately it was the only place I got an interview this year. I will graduate next year so should I just start preparing for the March gamsat? Is there any recommendations on how to distract myself until January ?
 
Hey, idk if this is the right place for it but I feel like I really bombed the jmp interview and unfortunately it was the only place I got an interview this year. I will graduate next year so should I just start preparing for the March gamsat? Is there any recommendations on how to distract myself until January ?
I can't relate to this but I can appreciate your situation, try to see the positive! You've got at least one interview up your sleeve (not sure of your past), and that'll give you a decent leg up when applying next year! Take this time to unwind, get back to doing more of your preferred hobbies, hangout with your friends etc. The time away from all of this is just as important as the preparation, its taken some time for me to learn this during my tertiary education years too.

Edit: perhaps also use this time to reflect on what you did well and what you could improve on for interviews next year. I'm a massive planner and it really helps me to reflect and plan for next time (well in advance).
 

Crow

Medical Student
Emeritus Staff
Hey, idk if this is the right place for it but I feel like I really bombed the jmp interview and unfortunately it was the only place I got an interview this year. I will graduate next year so should I just start preparing for the March gamsat? Is there any recommendations on how to distract myself until January ?
It can't hurt to do some preparation for GAMSAT in the meantime between now and JMP place offer release, but I agree with the above - take some time to wind down, relax, recuperate and treat yourself before launching into the thick of preparation.

Once you've found the outcome of your JMP application, we will be happy to provide some advice on your situation if you need it.
 

JL538

Monash University - BMedSc/MD I
Hey guys, just curious, but for postgraduate entry into medicine/dentistry, are there still as many equity schemes/bonuses (rural, disadvantaged schools, low SES, Indigenous, life challenges (home responsibilities, mental health etc.)) or are they largely gone since going to university basically levels the playing field? Also, I know that universites do sometimes have a bias for their own undergrad students (Monash, UQ, Flinders) but do they still discriminate against interstate students?
 
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LMG!

MBBS IV
Administrator
Hey guys, just curious, but for postgraduate entry into medicine/dentistry, are there still as many equity schemes/bonuses (rural, disadvantaged schools, low SES, Indigenous, life challenges (home responsibilities, mental health etc.)) or are they largely gone since going to university basically levels the playing field? Also, I know that universites do sometimes have a bias for their own undergrad students (Monash, UQ, Flinders) but do they still discriminate against interstate students?

Edit: this probably doesn't belong here but idk where to post it

It is University specific: you can check most of them out here: http://gemsas.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/2021-Medicine-GEMSAS-Admissions-Guide-v1.7.pdf
 

timleyton

Member
Hey guys, I wasnt sure s to where I should place my question, so im sorry if its in the wrong thread. Since you can do the gamsat in your 2nd and 3rd year of your undergrad degree, are you able to do the gamsat 4 times over the last two years of that degree and will they choose the highest gamsat score out of the 4 times?
 

dotwingz

Google Enthusiast
Moderator
Yep Currency of results | Graduate Medical School Admissions Test | GAMSAT | ACER

GAMSAT results obtained from different sittings are directly comparable and can be used when applying to certain universities for up to two consecutive years. This means that candidates may apply for admission to the graduate entry schools up to two years after the date on which they sit the test.

Candidates can sit either the March or September test and use the results of either to apply to Australian ... programs. Candidates may choose to sit more than one test and use the best score in their application. There is no restriction on the number of times an eligible candidate may sit GAMSAT.
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
are you able to do the gamsat 4 times over the last two years of that degree and will they choose the highest gamsat score out of the 4 times?
Adding to dotwingz's reply, you can sit 4 times but only the best of the first 3 counts. The 4th results won't come out in time for your final-year application.

(The 4th can be used if you need to apply again the following year, but of course you don't really wish for that :D )
 

chinaski

Regular Member
(The 4th can be used if you need to apply again the following year, but of course you don't really wish for that :D )
Unless, of course, the applicant wishes to take some time out between degrees. We should really avoid thinking in such linear terms...!
 

timleyton

Member
Thanks guys!! I did forget to add that I was talking about applying after the degree had finished, sorry that I didn't mention that.
 
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