Graduate Entry Medicine Advice Requests

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
If after I graduate from a bachelor's degree, I start another degree, will I still be able to use the GPA from my completed degree
Adding to LMG!'s reply, you should read through the Gemsas guide. Several grad-entry schools use your most recent 3 years of tertiary studies for the GPA i.e. if you complete one year of a new degree it'll be this plus the final two years of the completed degree.

Since you mentioned "applying again as an undergrad student" did you mean to the undergrad med schools for non-standards? (since undergrad students can't apply to grad schools until final year). In this case WSU will use the new GPA alone if it's 1 semester or more, JMP 1 year or more, UNSW apparently combines old & new together.
 

hk092000

Member
Adding to LMG!'s reply, you should read through the Gemsas guide. Several grad-entry schools use your most recent 3 years of tertiary studies for the GPA i.e. if you complete one year of a new degree it'll be this plus the final two years of the completed degree.

Since you mentioned "applying again as an undergrad student" did you mean to the undergrad med schools for non-standards? (since undergrad students can't apply to grad schools until final year). In this case WSU will use the new GPA alone if it's 1 semester or more, JMP 1 year or more, UNSW apparently combines old & new together.
What I meant with "applying again as an undergrad student", was that will the GPA from my completed degree not count for anything once I start another degree? And will I have to apply again as an undergrad with my new degree?
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
will I have to apply again as an undergrad with my new degree?
If apply again with your new degree you would have to wait until its final year since Gemsas won't calculate a new GPA with just one year. But you can apply during 1st/2nd year using (solely or partly) your completed degree's GPA.

will the GPA from my completed degree not count for anything once I start another degree?
Have a read on page 42 > http://gemsas.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/2021-Medicine-GEMSAS-Admissions-Guide-v1.7.pdf

For ANU for example : The GPA calculation is based on three years of full-time equivalent study (3.0 FTE) in your most recent degree. This means the 1st/2nd year of your new degree won't count, it's your most recent study not most recent degree.

Otoh page 79 for UWA : The GPA is calculated on the most recent three years (FTE) of study. Applicants who have undertaken additional study (whether postgraduate or additional undergraduate study) should indicate this on the GEMSAS application. So it's partly your completed degree plus the new study. I think the two Notre Dame schools are like this too.
 

sunnyrain

Member
Hello! Hope you're having a good day thus far.

GPA is what's important, not your WAM right? For instance, if you had a 86 WAM for something, that would count as a High Distinction (which is equal to a 7) and a 96 WAM would be equal to a 7 so technically, both those marks are the same GPA wise right?

If so, is there any advantage of having a higher WAM like in the case above, when they are both the same GPA in the end anyway?
 

Sherlock

Emeritus Staff
Emeritus Staff
Hello! Hope you're having a good day thus far.

GPA is what's important, not your WAM right? For instance, if you had a 86 WAM for something, that would count as a High Distinction (which is equal to a 7) and a 96 WAM would be equal to a 7 so technically, both those marks are the same GPA wise right?

If so, is there any advantage of having a higher WAM like in the case above, when they are both the same GPA in the end anyway?
GEMSAS will use your WAM for each unit to calculate your GPA. This is because of discrepancies at each universities with regards to what WAM score is considered a high distinction or a distinction, i.e. some unis have 80+ as their HD cut-off, while some have 85+.
 

sunnyrain

Member
Yeah. So what I'm saying is: for e.g let's say GEMSAS count an 80+ as a HD and if someone got an 86 or a 96, in the end they're both counted as a HD and thus a 7 by GEMSAS. So it doesn't matter that 96 is higher than 86 as they're both counted as 7 anyway in the end? Like, after a certain point your mark doesn't matter.

Hope that made sense!
 

Sherlock

Emeritus Staff
Emeritus Staff
Yeah. So what I'm saying is: for e.g let's say GEMSAS count an 80+ as a HD and if someone got an 86 or a 96, in the end they're both counted as a HD and thus a 7 by GEMSAS. So it doesn't matter that 96 is higher than 86 as they're both counted as 7 anyway in the end? Like, after a certain point your mark doesn't matter.

Hope that made sense!
Correct.
 

nourz

Member
Hi guys need helpppp regarding CASPER test for gemsas application for Uni of Wollongong- I can only find information regarding admissions cycle 2020-2021, for example when I am browsing test dates the only one availble as stated on their website is Jun 05 2020.... where are the 2021 dates?! Have I missed something?
 

2xq

Allied Health Member
Hi guys need helpppp regarding CASPER test for gemsas application for Uni of Wollongong- I can only find information regarding admissions cycle 2020-2021, for example when I am browsing test dates the only one availble as stated on their website is Jun 05 2020.... where are the 2021 dates?! Have I missed something?
Definitely the wrong thread to be asking this in [Edit: Post got moved to the correct thread]. I don't know much about the process for postgraduate entry but there is another forum known as PagingDr. Probably a lot more useful to go check stuff out there.
 
Last edited:

nourz

Member
Definitely the wrong thread to be asking this in. I don't know much about the process for postgraduate entry but there is another forum known as PagingDr. Probably a lot more useful to go check stuff out there.
Thank you
 
Hey guys!

I am currently in grade 12, hoping to get into UQ dentistry. If not, I was thinking of medical imaging at QUT so I can get into a course that still gets me into the workplace but also allows me time to study for gamsat and ensure a high GPA if I wanna transfer into dentistry (or medicine if I have to go post grad as would be better to apply for that as well if I don’t get into dentistry this year).

However, I don’t really understand how applying postgrad works… do I need to choose apply to specific universities now to transfer into dentistry later or can I apply with any course to any uni? If anyone has a list of steps to apply and which unis I could apply for, that’ll be amazing!

Thanks :)
 

dotwingz

Google Enthusiast
Moderator
You can apply with any bachelors, just gotta make sure you satisfy the prereqs. I know USyd requires some biology for their dental students, but dont think anywhere else does (worth double checking tho), usually prereqs can be satisfied in any degree via electives cause they're usually pretty light.
 
Hey all,

Just wondering if I could get some advice - so I'm currently doing nursing (MN) as a 'Plan B' but after 3 weeks of placements, I'm starting to really question whether the nursing role is actually right for me. Don't get me wrong, I've thoroughly enjoyed my studies/program so far but I'm just hating placements. I am finding the tasks that I'm required to do during my 8hr shifts very monotonous/not stimulating - mostly all I do is obs (hourly, 4th hourly), medication administration, documentation, and assist patients with things when required such as bottle/pad change/mobility/telemetry. Like is this essentially what the job involves or does it get better?

I guess when I started the degree, it was kind of a way for me to get closer to medicine and gain more exposure to hospitals/patients - plus if I did stick to it, it would provide me with an alternate career whereby I could enter the workforce very quickly and move overseas. I'm not sure though if it's because my past/current placements have been at small cardio wards (28-beds / 30-beds) and I might enjoy ED more. Currently though, I just find nursing really draining/mind-numbing and I can't help but constantly look over and be more interested in what the doctors are doing/talking about.

I have a deferred GAMSAT sitting in March next year, which means that the earliest admission for med is 2023. If I persist then I could finish this degree at the end of next year - but I'm just wondering if others think it's worth pushing through or if I should start REALLY focusing my energy on med knowing what I know now that I actually think I will hate the nursing job? I do feel like I've learnt so much in my program (theory-wise) and like I said, I do enjoy it - I have to admit though, it's been pretty full-on with studies/work and I have actually done zero GAMSAT study over the past semester. It will probably be the same case next semester too :-/ Hoping for some guidance.
 

chinaski

Regular Member
Bear in mind that only three weeks into placements, you're not exactly going to be asked to do the higher or more challenging tasks of nursing, are you? Any job involves a lot of repetition and scut - nursing is no different. However, there is a lot of capacity for more challenging roles other than taking observations in nursing. Also consider: nursing may be draining, but medicine is too. Even if you enjoy and are engaged with a role, it is exhausting and will have its fair share of monotony, regardless.
 

Gungeon

Member
Hey all,

Just wondering if I could get some advice - so I'm currently doing nursing (MN) as a 'Plan B' but after 3 weeks of placements, I'm starting to really question whether the nursing role is actually right for me. Don't get me wrong, I've thoroughly enjoyed my studies/program so far but I'm just hating placements. I am finding the tasks that I'm required to do during my 8hr shifts very monotonous/not stimulating - mostly all I do is obs (hourly, 4th hourly), medication administration, documentation, and assist patients with things when required such as bottle/pad change/mobility/telemetry. Like is this essentially what the job involves or does it get better?

I guess when I started the degree, it was kind of a way for me to get closer to medicine and gain more exposure to hospitals/patients - plus if I did stick to it, it would provide me with an alternate career whereby I could enter the workforce very quickly and move overseas. I'm not sure though if it's because my past/current placements have been at small cardio wards (28-beds / 30-beds) and I might enjoy ED more. Currently though, I just find nursing really draining/mind-numbing and I can't help but constantly look over and be more interested in what the doctors are doing/talking about.

I have a deferred GAMSAT sitting in March next year, which means that the earliest admission for med is 2023. If I persist then I could finish this degree at the end of next year - but I'm just wondering if others think it's worth pushing through or if I should start REALLY focusing my energy on med knowing what I know now that I actually think I will hate the nursing job? I do feel like I've learnt so much in my program (theory-wise) and like I said, I do enjoy it - I have to admit though, it's been pretty full-on with studies/work and I have actually done zero GAMSAT study over the past semester. It will probably be the same case next semester too :-/ Hoping for some guidance.
Hey AnatDissection,
I'm a year 2 Med Student and I've been an RN since 2016. I've worked mainly in the Cath Lab, ED and cardiac ward.
Here's my two cents.
I think I had similar feelings during my nursing degree. I rarely found the 8hr ward shifts stimulating. The work wasn't fun nor interesting. It's just hard work. But things got much better when I landed a job in the cath lab. Its a mixture theatre/anaesthetic/acute care nursing. I loved it. I wanted to be the best at it. Hard work is much easier when it becomes something you can be passionate about.
Good news is: there are many areas of nursing that are like this. Bad news is: usually you have to the crap less appealing jobs to get to the good ones and nursing is always hard work in one way or another.
My advice would be keep doing the MN, its probably the one of the stable and safe jobs you can get. The conditions are pretty good too (pay the union fees). It's a good springboard to another health career whether it be med or something else.
Also, by your post, I'm assuming you started the MN to boost your GPA for post grad medicine? If so maybe focus on maintaining a good GPA. If not, Id book in the next GAMSAT you can with the thinking it'll be your last GAMSAT. The worst outcome being that you would've had the best preparation to do better the next time you do the exam.
Good luck!
 

Ari Wilson

Member
Hey all,

Just wondering if I could get some advice - so I'm currently doing nursing (MN) as a 'Plan B' but after 3 weeks of placements, I'm starting to really question whether the nursing role is actually right for me. Don't get me wrong, I've thoroughly enjoyed my studies/program so far but I'm just hating placements. I am finding the tasks that I'm required to do during my 8hr shifts very monotonous/not stimulating - mostly all I do is obs (hourly, 4th hourly), medication administration, documentation, and assist patients with things when required such as bottle/pad change/mobility/telemetry. Like is this essentially what the job involves or does it get better?

I guess when I started the degree, it was kind of a way for me to get closer to medicine and gain more exposure to hospitals/patients - plus if I did stick to it, it would provide me with an alternate career whereby I could enter the workforce very quickly and move overseas. I'm not sure though if it's because my past/current placements have been at small cardio wards (28-beds / 30-beds) and I might enjoy ED more. Currently though, I just find nursing really draining/mind-numbing and I can't help but constantly look over and be more interested in what the doctors are doing/talking about.

I have a deferred GAMSAT sitting in March next year, which means that the earliest admission for med is 2023. If I persist then I could finish this degree at the end of next year - but I'm just wondering if others think it's worth pushing through or if I should start REALLY focusing my energy on med knowing what I know now that I actually think I will hate the nursing job? I do feel like I've learnt so much in my program (theory-wise) and like I said, I do enjoy it - I have to admit though, it's been pretty full-on with studies/work and I have actually done zero GAMSAT study over the past semester. It will probably be the same case next semester too :-/ Hoping for some guidance.
Hey AnatDissection,

If you decide to pursue a medical degree, maybe applying for graduate entry medicine in Europe will be a good option for you. Medical schools in Europe also have this accelerated course that allows nurses and biomedical science graduates to get an MD in 5 years or less. I think you can research this option because it may be easier for you since most European medical schools don’t have entry exams for graduate entry. This means that you can be accepted just by presenting a transcript from your previous degree.

Depending on what subjects you previously studied you can skip the first 1 or 2 years. In other words, when you apply to a specific medical university that offers graduate entry the admissions team will calculate your subjects and study hours. Therefore you will be able to start your medical education directly from year 2-3.
 

dotwingz

Google Enthusiast
Moderator
Obligatory read the fine print. These places are often expensive, with little scholarships or loans avaliable, and offer a long uncertain pathway back to Australia if you ever want to practice here.

Read the common pitfalls link in my signature
 
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