Graduate Entry Medicine Advice Requests

My advice would be keep doing the MN, its probably the one of the stable and safe jobs you can get. The conditions are pretty good too (pay the union fees). It's a good springboard to another health career whether it be med or something else.
Also, by your post, I'm assuming you started the MN to boost your GPA for post grad medicine?
Thanks Gungeon for your insights.

My undergrad marks are sufficient to apply now for some unis and it's just an issue of getting a decent GAMSAT score. I've struggled to self-study for the GAMSAT though as I do prefer structured learning like at uni, so I think I will definitely need to do a prep course if I want to give the March 2022 sitting a real shot. Have heard good feedback about one comprehensive prep course but it requires a substantial time commitment and submission of weekly essays. I don't think it's going to be manageable to commit to it alongside full-time study/part-time work. I do have the option of putting a pause on the MN program or switching to part-time study (2 units) so that will give me more time to focus on the GAMSAT. Do you think this will be a good idea? It would of course delay my course completion until 2023.

I don't want to give a bad impression by what I will say next but I think it's better to be direct so I can get honest advice. I'm struggling to decide between chasing my med dreams or settling for nursing (albeit probably living a very comfortable life). I'm a realist and if I do decide to pursue med at this point, then that will likely mean giving up my current relationship. My partner is encouraging me to finish nursing as early as possible so we can start life. Med would be another decade potentially.

I am aware of the low retention rates and nursing shortages. Many grads leave the profession after 2 years and TBH, I feel that will be me. If I continue with nursing then it'd be largely because of my partner's encouragement. This is how I see life panning out though: work 1-2 years as a RN after, get married, live a comfortable life (he's in med), probably be a stay at home mum, and probably start a business/social enterprise venture of some sort after having kids. The alternative is to focus on myself and my own aspirations but to potentially go through life alone. Do you think I will look back in a decade's time and feel I've spent so many years at uni, worked so hard (probably doing a lot of overtime), and regret having given up other facets? Can someone share their experience of whether being a doctor is worth it in the end or would you go back and pick a comfortable life?
 

Gungeon

Member
No problem, it sounds like you're in a rough position. Firstly, don't treat trust my advice, I am so not qualified to give life advice.
Here's my advice:
Thanks Gungeon for your insights.

My undergrad marks are sufficient to apply now for some unis and it's just an issue of getting a decent GAMSAT score. I've struggled to self-study for the GAMSAT though as I do prefer structured learning like at uni, so I think I will definitely need to do a prep course if I want to give the March 2022 sitting a real shot. Have heard good feedback about one comprehensive prep course but it requires a substantial time commitment and submission of weekly essays. I don't think it's going to be manageable to commit to it alongside full-time study/part-time work. I do have the option of putting a pause on the MN program or switching to part-time study (2 units) so that will give me more time to focus on the GAMSAT. Do you think this will be a good idea? It would of course delay my course completion until 2023.

Deferring/pausing/part-time uni is a good idea. It could give you the opportunity to put more effort into the GAMSAT prep. I wouldn't have been able to get anywhere near a decent GAMSAT score if I hadn't worked part-time. Although, I had a financially and emotionally supportive partner which made things much easier.

I don't want to give a bad impression by what I will say next but I think it's better to be direct so I can get honest advice. I'm struggling to decide between chasing my med dreams or settling for nursing (albeit probably living a very comfortable life). I'm a realist and if I do decide to pursue med at this point, then that will likely mean giving up my current relationship. My partner is encouraging me to finish nursing as early as possible so we can start life. Med would be another decade potentially.

I don't think you should give up on your relationship, from what I understand the GAMSAT is the limiting factor here and you've not received a result yet. If you do GAMSAT in March or even next month then you'll know where you stand in terms of what you need to do to get into a Medicine course. Ideally, you prepare as much as possible but if enough isn't enough then you can make the changes. But I think you'll need to convince him of how much your dreams mean to you and what you're planning as I'm sure he wouldn't want to be the reason you stop chasing your dreams nor you standing in the way of him starting a family.

I am aware of the low retention rates and nursing shortages. Many grads leave the profession after 2 years and TBH, I feel that will be me. If I continue with nursing then it'd be largely because of my partner's encouragement. This is how I see life panning out though: work 1-2 years as a RN after, get married, live a comfortable life (he's in med), probably be a stay at home mum, and probably start a business/social enterprise venture of some sort after having kids. The alternative is to focus on myself and my own aspirations but to potentially go through life alone. Do you think I will look back in a decade's time and feel I've spent so many years at uni, worked so hard (probably doing a lot of overtime), and regret having given up other facets? Can someone share their experience of whether being a doctor is worth it in the end or would you go back and pick a comfortable life?

You're asking the tough questions. No-one can answer these questions, I don't think. The choice between mum and med is a false one. While it would be much more difficult being a mum in med there are those superwomen who have kids during GAMSAT, med school and during the junior years. If your options are comfortable life vs med, it looks like a win-win to me, maybe you could do both. Or maybe you'll get to a stage in your life where one is more preferable. Plans change.

I think you need to have a crack as soon as you can. Definitely have the hard conversations with your partner about chasing your dreams, create some sort plan and see what happens. Also, I think you can your cake and eat it too. If you constantly try to fit as much as possible into your life, it'll be harder to look on with regret.
 

DrFlower

Trainee Intern
Looking for guide on applying to Australian uni for NCEA student and grad/non-standard. Please link a thread with useful info, ideally one that doesn't need GAMSAT. Have spent and hour reading up but cant find a thread/site with collective info. Needing to help some students with some guidance. Thank you!
 

LMG!

MBBS IV
Administrator
Looking for guide on applying to Australian uni for NCEA student and grad/non-standard. Please link a thread with useful info, ideally one that doesn't need GAMSAT. Have spent and hour reading up but cant find a thread/site with collective info. Needing to help some students with some guidance. Thank you!
 

DrFlower

Trainee Intern
Thanks LMG!
I see you did the non-standard pathway, do you mind sharing via PM, brief of your journey.

Much appreciated, thank you!
 

LMG!

MBBS IV
Administrator
Thanks LMG!
I see you did the non-standard pathway, do you mind sharing via PM, brief of your journey.

Much appreciated, thank you!

Undergrad --> honours --> doctorate --> employment in allied health for a few years --> non-standard applications via UMAT (now UCAT) to UNSW, JMP, WSU, and UTas (first preference) --> interviews at UNSW (that I declined), JMP, and WSU (UTas don't interview) --> offers to JMP, WSU, and UTas --> accepted UTas.

I contemplated GAMSAT but decided no thank you!
 
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