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Crow

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This is an old post so I would love to hear from current students on their thoughts about dentistry @ Griffith. If you can share your thoughts on the courses, the clinics, life at campus...etc then that would be greatly appreciated!
I'm going to tag kyleb as he is a current Griffith dentistry student that most recently posted here - hopefully he sees this before you need to make your decision!
 

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MrWhippe

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Bumping this old thread, as have a similar question to AndHan19 and given how many people I've seen on MSO that are interested in 2020 entry, I imagine others do as well - how is Griffith Dentistry regarded nowadays, and will it affect future employment opportunities or chances of specialisation?

Reputation is very, very low on the list of factors I care about, but if I'm going to be pursuing a ~150k degree, I want to do my due diligence and ensure it's a worthwhile investment; I'm sure I'll inevitably be faced with biases regardless of which course I choose, like any field.

Anecdotally I've heard good things about Griffith's Dentistry and Medical programs, and they seem to be really rising in public sentiment. One Orthodontist I've been in contact with mentioned that Griffith Dent Graduates are becoming increasingly well regarded, and has heard there's been a real conscientious effort to increase the quality of learning and incidentally rankings, principally through continuous refinement of the curriculum and attracting vaunted lecturers/professors from other universities. Though this is the only opinion I've heard.
 

Kezza

Regular Member
Bumping this old thread, as have a similar question to AndHan19 and given how many people I've seen on MSO that are interested in 2020 entry, I imagine others do as well - how is Griffith Dentistry regarded nowadays, and will it affect future employment opportunities or chances of specialisation?

Reputation is very, very low on the list of factors I care about, but if I'm going to be pursuing a ~150k degree, I want to do my due diligence and ensure it's a worthwhile investment; I'm sure I'll inevitably be faced with biases regardless of which course I choose, like any field.

Anecdotally I've heard good things about Griffith's Dentistry and Medical programs, and they seem to be really rising in public sentiment. One Orthodontist I've been in contact with mentioned that Griffith Dent Graduates are becoming increasingly well regarded, and has heard there's been a real conscientious effort to increase the quality of learning and incidentally rankings, principally through continuous refinement of the curriculum and attracting vaunted lecturers/professors from other universities. Though this is the only opinion I've heard.
Honestly, I can't see anyone viewing your university of choice as an impact on your employability. How you perform on placements has a much higher impact than where you studied. Anyone that judges your worth based on where you studied is a twat and also discriminatory, with only the latter being illegal unfortunately.
 
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MrWhippe

Regular Member
Honestly, I can't see anyone viewing your university of choice as an impact on your employability. How you perform on placements has a much higher (and total) than where you studied.
Yeah, I don't think it'll have much bearing ultimately. Though some people (typically older practicing dentists from what I've experienced) have certain biases, and certain institutions sometimes preference students who've had past study with them. Just think it's worth doing appropriate research.

What do you mean by placement performance? How would future prospective employers be privy to how I perform on placement?
 

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Crow

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How would future prospective employers be privy to how I perform on placement?
I’m not a dentist, however, presumably to find jobs in dentistry you’ll need to have referees to support your application; you’ll ideally find said referees through your placements (if you don’t perform well on placement, you either won’t have a referee or the referee won’t suggest that you’re a good worker).
 

REGULAR JOE

Regular Member
I just saw an old post on this thread that says the last 2 years are full fee? If any med course this has a certain number of years(example-the last year) it would say so on the website right?
 
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A1

Admissions Speculator
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I just saw an old post on this thread that says the last 2 years are full fee? If any med course this has a certain number of years(example-the last year) it would say so on the website right?
The last two years of Griffth Dent is a full-fee Master i.e. separate from the initial Bachelor. Reason for this is the gov doesn't give GU any CSP quota for Dent; GU gets around this by making it a 3-year "generic" Bachelor (which is CSP since not under med/dent quota control) + 2-year full-fee Master which unis are allowed to run as postgrad.

In a way Macquarie has done something similar. They get no CSP quota for Med so they have opened a full-fee MD course (note they wouldn't be allowed to open a full-fee undergrad Med course like Bond, Bond can because it's a private uni).
 

laerla

Member
Bumping this old thread, as have a similar question to AndHan19 and given how many people I've seen on MSO that are interested in 2020 entry, I imagine others do as well - how is Griffith Dentistry regarded nowadays, and will it affect future employment opportunities or chances of specialisation?

Reputation is very, very low on the list of factors I care about, but if I'm going to be pursuing a ~150k degree, I want to do my due diligence and ensure it's a worthwhile investment; I'm sure I'll inevitably be faced with biases regardless of which course I choose, like any field.

Anecdotally I've heard good things about Griffith's Dentistry and Medical programs, and they seem to be really rising in public sentiment. One Orthodontist I've been in contact with mentioned that Griffith Dent Graduates are becoming increasingly well regarded, and has heard there's been a real conscientious effort to increase the quality of learning and incidentally rankings, principally through continuous refinement of the curriculum and attracting vaunted lecturers/professors from other universities. Though this is the only opinion I've heard.
I think nowadays employers are tending to care less about which unis you graduated from, obviously as long as the degree is somewhere from UK USA AUS NZ etc. I have seen bad work done by graduates from the so called "prestigious unis" eg. UQ, Adel, Melb USyd etc., and have also seen very good work done by graduates from so called "not so prestigious" unis eg. Griffith CSU JCU graduates...so I think which unis does not really matter, it's more on yourself and how much you learn during the degree...sure if the owner of the practice graduated from "prestigious unis", they prob more likely to hire graduates from their own unis, but that's about it.

With regards to specialisation, not really either. Even good grades aren't needed nowadays
Hope that helps
 

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Tomato

Regular Member
I think nowadays employers are tending to care less about which unis you graduated from, obviously as long as the degree is somewhere from UK USA AUS NZ etc. I have seen bad work done by graduates from the so called "prestigious unis" eg. UQ, Adel, Melb USyd etc., and have also seen very good work done by graduates from so called "not so prestigious" unis eg. Griffith CSU JCU graduates...so I think which unis does not really matter, it's more on yourself and how much you learn during the degree...sure if the owner of the practice graduated from "prestigious unis", they prob more likely to hire graduates from their own unis, but that's about it.

With regards to specialisation, not really either. Even good grades aren't needed nowadays
Hope that helps
I think the main difference between "prestigious" and "non-prestigious" unis is on the research aspect. The undergraduate curriculum and clinical teaching ability have no difference. Therefore, I agree nobody cares about where you graduate but your clinical ability. If you want to specialize later, you most likely have to study at one of the "prestigious" unis because the "non-prestigious" unis have no specialty training program yet at the moment (except Griffith's perio program, maybe soon the endo as well).
 

laerla

Member
I think the main difference between "prestigious" and "non-prestigious" unis is on the research aspect. The undergraduate curriculum and clinical teaching ability have no difference. Therefore, I agree nobody cares about where you graduate but your clinical ability. If you want to specialize later, you most likely have to study at one of the "prestigious" unis because the "non-prestigious" unis have no specialty training program yet at the moment (except Griffith's perio program, maybe soon the endo as well).
That's partly true because at the end of the day, it is all about connections. When you study at the uni that offers the specialty programs you want to get in, and you get to know those professors who run the programs, it will do you well. Grades don't matter much these days
 
Could not disagree more. The first year is terrible with little to no actual dental exposure and the subjects were the equivalent of year 11/12 content. This should be your last preference
It's nice that you found first year very easy. For anyone else who might come across this post, I would like to elaborate and hopefully provide more insight into studying Dental Health Science at Griffith. The two courses that I would say cover year 11/12 content are 1001MSC (chemistry) and 1014MSC (biology). This is necessary in order to get all students doing these courses (medsc, nutrition and dietetics, health sc, etc.) on the same page, since biology and chemistry are not prerequisites. It would not be feasible to start immediately in more advanced chemistry and biology and so, covering all of year 11 and 12 content in one trimester (plus other content) is standard for Griffith and other dental schools too, where certain subjects are not prerequisites.
 

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