Higher Degrees

Crow

Medical Student
Emeritus Staff
Nope. It's a level 7 qualification in Australia (equivalent to a Master's)
Actually, level 7 is indeed a bachelor's level degree. Masters is level 9. Ultimately the difference translates to very minimum when it comes to practicing medicine in Australia - both an MD and an MBBS qualify you to do the same thing.
 

Verdigris

toddler med student
Silliest Member 2019
If you do an honours year, you can generally go straight into a PhD from there, to answer your original question! At least, that's what is the case in NZ and I imagine it is similar in Aus :)
 

garmonbozia

Membered Value
Valued Member
Actually, level 7 is indeed a bachelor's level degree. Masters is level 9. Ultimately the difference translates to very minimum when it comes to practicing medicine in Australia - both an MD and an MBBS qualify you to do the same thing.
Apologies. Am a clown 🤡
 

chinaski

Regular Member
If you do an honours year, you can generally go straight into a PhD from there, to answer your original question! At least, that's what is the case in NZ and I imagine it is similar in Aus :)

You don't necessarily need an honours year in addition to a medical degree in order to do a PhD in Australia.
 

Verdigris

toddler med student
Silliest Member 2019
You don't necessarily need an honours year in addition to a medical degree in order to do a PhD in Australia.
I knew this was true of MD but is it also true of MBBS?
 
Hello guys, I am 5 year medical student.
Should I do Ph.D program or Recidency first?
First one is for academic stability position and the later is for the money. Im personally more leaning towards Ph.D first since I am afraid that doing the recidency first means I will forget recidency skills with Ph.D programs and impact on the patients well being.
 

dotwingz

Google Enthusiast
Moderator
Um are you Australian? We don’t do residencies here, if you aren’t i’m not sure advice from Australians will be very relevant…
 

LMG!

MBBS IV
Administrator
Um are you Australian? We don’t do residencies here, if you aren’t i’m not sure advice from Australians will be very relevant…
JMOs are referred to as 'residents' at the hospital I'm at. I have no idea if this practice is wide-spread. Perhaps this is what the OP is talking about?
 

chinaski

Regular Member
No, I suspect they’re using American terminology - “residency” meaning a training programme. “Resident” to denote a pre-vocational PGY2+ doctor in Australia is common, but not what they mean here, I think.
 
Hello, sorry for lack of background clarification.
I am medstudent in Indonesia. You study medicine for first 5 years.
3,5 years for bachelor degree (medicine degrees)
2 years for profession degree (M.D title) (I am here now)
1 year of internship on remote places in Indonesia

After that you can choose between
1. 3-4 years of Doctoral/Ph.d/Master degree for academical position
2. 4-6 years of Recidency (Speciality programs)
3. be a GP

I am torn between option number 2 and number 1.

Speciality programs are things like surgery, obgyn, cardio, internist, pulmonologist etc
 

dotwingz

Google Enthusiast
Moderator
Yeah i’m afraid no one here really has any idea of what would be beneficial to you in Indonesia sorry, you could try Student Doctor Network, they’re a much more international forum

Sounds like to me a PhD would lead you onto a pathway to becoming an academic rather than a clinician…
 
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