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How many years does it take to become an anesthesiologist?

frootloop

House Surgeon
Moderator
so lets say i do undergrad biomed then move onto post grad med 4 years later, on average how many years will i be looking at to be a anaesthetist?
On average? No idea. Theoretically the minimum it takes before you're allowed to apply for anaesthetics training positions is 2 years after you graduate, although I gather you'd be doing very well to get on that quickly. My understanding is that, where I am at least, they usually like you to have 3 or 4 years under your belt before you get onto the program.

I'm pretty sure anaesthetics is then a 5-year training program, assuming you do it all full-time, don't take any time off, and pass everything on the first attempt.

The specifics are impossible to predict considering you're yet to even start medical school, but between your undergrad degree (3 years), med school (4 years), your pre-vocational years (~2-4 years) and specialty training (~5 years)... You're looking at at least 15 years.

But seriously, don't worry about that now. There's nothing you can do about it, for starters, and there isn't really any rush, for seconds. Hell, I'm in my 7th year of university, having gotten into medicine as an undergraduate and then spending a couple of years off doing research and other postgraduate stuff. It's not a race.
 

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OhSoSwift

New Member
HOOOOOOLLYYYYYYYYYYYYYY S**T damn 15-20 years, thats an extremely long time. the reason i wanted to become an anaesthetist is because ive always want to become someone important and to earn good money, also the medicine industry is interesting for me. do you think i can find another job where i get roughly 250+k a year and dont have to study that long in medicine or no?
 
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frootloop

House Surgeon
Moderator
It might sound terrible to be 'studying' for that long, but remember that you get paid (fairly well, too) for everything after medical school. So it's only the first 5-7 years where you're an unpaid 'student' - after that you're a junior doctor.

Pretty much all of the major training pathways in medicine take around that long, really. The shorter ones are the likes of GP and psychiatry, but even they're only a year or two shorter (and they'd be lucky to hit the $250k mark you're aiming for!).

If you want to be a doctor, get used to the idea of lengthy training times haha.

(I'll leave the whole 'I want to be a doctor so I can be important and earn lots of money' thing aside for now, but you should probably look into your own motivations a bit more closely before deciding this is what you want to do...)
 

OhSoSwift

New Member
It might sound terrible to be 'studying' for that long, but remember that you get paid (fairly well, too) for everything after medical school. So it's only the first 5-7 years where you're an unpaid 'student' - after that you're a junior doctor.

Pretty much all of the major training pathways in medicine take around that long, really. The shorter ones are the likes of GP and psychiatry, but even they're only a year or two shorter (and they'd be lucky to hit the $250k mark you're aiming for!).

If you want to be a doctor, get used to the idea of lengthy training times haha.
thank you so much man your a f***ng living legend i greatly appreciate the help man.
 

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Kiwiology

MSO Lawyer
so lets say i do undergrad biomed then move onto post grad med 4 years later, on average how many years will i be looking at to be an anaesthetist?
Like Frooty said, you need at least a couple of years pre-vocational training and five years of anaesthesia training, presuming you do everything in minimum time you'll be looking at a minimum of fourteen years (three undergrad, four med, two PVT, and five specialist training) however not everybody does everything in minimum time.

Honestly? Don't worry about it now.
 

Kiwilander

Regular Member
Good on you mate :)

I was having a squiz at what rosters look like for my specialities of interest as I'm one of these "mature" students and at least for NoRTH (Auckland DHBs) the anaes regs seem to quite a bit of night work and call (as I alluded to above) so presumably you can you start cases on your own for emergencies and such while the boss gets out of bed and comes in?

In your hospital does anaesthesia cover trauma calls? Increasingly I've seen this not happen and either (a) the ICU Registrar will attend (what can I say? I only know people at those glass tower hospitals which have CICM trainees :p), or (b) it is expected of ED medical personnel to perform this function (not unreasonable in ... mm, choosing my words carefully here ... *most* circumstances).
I work at Westmead Hospital, which one of the largest hospitals in Oceania - after hours isn't too bad. Maybe 1-2 shifts per fornight and maybe a weekend every 2-3. The transition from doing cases with full supervision to independent is a grey area - you'll call in bosses from some cases, and some cases you'll just do on your own.

We do attend trauma calls in our centre. Not that I have done a whole lot at them so far :p
 

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pi

Junior doctor
Administrar
You need to have a primary medical degree. That is a university qualification that can either be undergraduate-entry (ie. start after yet 12, UMAT and interview generally required) or graduate-entry (ie. start after doing a degree beforehand, usually a science sort of degrees, GAMSAT and interview generally required)
 

WiseGirl

New Member
Just wondering,
Are there any places in Aus that you can become an anaesthetist? If so, where are they and what unis?
 

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A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
Just wondering,
Are there any places in Aus that you can become an anaesthetist? If so, where are they and what unis?
See pi's post just above. You need to gain entry to a med school first for an AMC-accredited med degree, then 2-4 years intern + RMO before competing for anaesthetist vocational training.
 

lozzaroo

New Member
Does anyone know what the CV/ resume requirements are to get onto the anaesthetics training program in Australia? I can't find info anywhere! Cheers, a 2nd year medical student.
 

Perplex

Moderator
Moderator
Does anyone know what the CV/ resume requirements are to get onto the anaesthetics training program in Australia? I can't find info anywhere! Cheers, a 2nd year medical student.
Best to have a look at the ANZCA website for further details, and have a chat to the anaesthetics trainees at your clinical site.
 

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