JCU JCU 2017 Interview Offers Official Thread

Discussion in 'Interviews' started by Benjamin, Nov 17, 2016.

  1. MyMonkey

    MyMonkey New Member

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    Mana,

    That would only be true if we actually knew what the selection criteria was.... It could be some other factor including age, state etc.... you never really know.

    I find it difficult to understand why GPA doesn't take into consideration what level the study is .... getting a high GPA over the first year of uni is much easier than getting it over an entire course, and getting a high GPA in a masters or doctoral level is much harder still...

    Not always the best that get in unfortunately .....
     
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  2. batman_99

    batman_99 New Member

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    Mana, you need to understand that not all applicants are equal in the eyes of the unis. People getting 95 and 96 ATARS get into medicine just because they have lived in a rural area. People like me who live in urban areas are forced to produce higher ATAR score (98+). So please, don't say that other applicants are better because a lot of times they just aren't better. Again, your apology is much appreciated.
     
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  3. batman_99

    batman_99 New Member

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    In fact, I just met a doctor today who achieved an ATAR of 98.2 and got in to medicine. Just another example of the fault in the selection process in terms of ATAR scores.
     
  4. stateofmind

    stateofmind medhopeful 2016

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    I fail to see the "fault" in the situation
     
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  5. B2

    B2 Regular Member

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    Guys, there is no point arguing over the situation that JCU has put some people under. @Mana is just trying to highlight why the person may have not gotten a second round interview offer from his past experiences. The best and most determined applicants will become doctors one day, whether that is in 6 years or 7 or 8 is the only difference.

    Just remember that medicine is having someone's lives in our hands so they are choosy with their selection procedures and will only pick the best applicants needed for the current medical situations in the country, ( for example, rural applicants being picked with 96 ATAR as they provide a higher possibility of returning to the rural areas to practice medicine)
     
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  6. Mana

    Mana Registrar Administrar

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    The best rural students are selected because they are the best in their quota set aside for rural students. You aren't better than the rural ones to the university just because you have a higher ATAR because you have no established rural background which they use in their selection criteria. As I said above, you should leave the judging of who is the best to the university; you don't deserve a place because you scored higher than some rural applicant that did - that's rather self-entitled of you to think you know better than the admissions department. Rural students are selected ahead of urban ones like yourself because they are deemed to be more likely (i.e. better than you at) to go back and serve the rural community doctor shortage, which Australia needs more than another urban doctor - so in this sense they are vastly better than you for the purposes of admission.

    You have no clue what you are talking about re: quality of candidates and university selections. If this person is a doctor now, that means they would have received an offer to medicine at least five, six, or seven years ago, depending on where they did their degree. You'll find that 98.2 was a more competitive score back then than now - cutoffs have been slowly on the rise in the last ten years. Please go do some research before you continue talking.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2017
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  7. Mana

    Mana Registrar Administrar

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    While we don't know the exact breakdown of the selection criteria for JCU, it is *not that different* to other medical schools in terms of qualities and experiences. Age is not one of them; locations of experiences (especially whether those locations are rural and/or related to tropical or Aboriginal medicine) *is* one of them.

    GPA doesn't take into consideration what level the study is - I agree - but you'll also find that throughout the medical system that it evens out - the GPA cutoff for first year students wanting to get into an undergraduate course is generally very high (i.e. close to 7), while if you apply to graduate entry medicine the GPA cutoff (requiring a completed degree - and therefore having had completed at least 3rd year uni) is much lower - high 5/7 to high 6/7 depending on demand of the university. When you have completed a Masters (by research) some of these graduate entry universities will give you an automatic 7.0 GPA equivalent for completing it, and if you've done a PhD that automatic 7.0 is pretty much everywhere. Ergo, you don't need to get a high GPA if you have a masters or doctoral degree (by research) - it's automatically granted to you if you have done it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2017
  8. stateofmind

    stateofmind medhopeful 2016

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    I don't want to further this disagreement but I wish to voice my 2 cents:

    Doctors should exhibit empathy. While I understand that individuals like batman_99 and may be feeling frustrated, have you (or anyone who agrees with him) ever considered the perspective of the rural candidates you may believe as "not better" and hence undeserving of interviews? It's understandable to feel "helpless" but is it right to blame others instead of yourself when you don't get something you want? Some rural candidates possibly lack access to the same standard of education many urban candidates do, making it harder to get high results. Note to whoever feels frustrated about the issue of rural students getting into JCU med with lower atars and not you: you applied for a course with a focus on righting social inequity. With an attitude of frustration and "helplessness" towards socially disadvantaged candidates, no offense but it's no surprise you didn't land an interview.
    .
     
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  9. Rissa11

    Rissa11 New Member

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    I wholeheartedly agree that doctors should exhibit empathy, but this disagreement stemmed with a person lacking that empathy.

    I think batman_99 was just stating that how in some cases, someone in an urban setting who has a high ATAR may miss out because of the emphasis on rural candidates, which does not mean that the urban student with a high ATAR is not a strong applicant or any less deserving. I think that's the point he was trying to make. I can assure you, those of us who missed out, do NOT think that we are MORE deserving of an interview than the applicants who got an offer. I personally congratulate them and wish them the best.

    None of us are in any position to decide who is more deserving or not. Each of us felt we had a good application to accompany our ATAR/GPA, hence why we decided to apply for JCU, an application heavy university. JCU decided we weren't good enough, that's okay, we will just keep trying. We are all just very passionate about one things, becoming a doctor and as cliche as this sounds, making a difference. So please try to understand that there is no malice behind our helplessness and frustration.
     
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  10. Rissa11

    Rissa11 New Member

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    Again, don't kick someone when they are down. Unnecessary and mean comment to make, without knowing their situation. Saying "no offense" doesn't make it better.
     
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  11. Mana

    Mana Registrar Administrar

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    Regardless of the educational disadvantage that rural students face, the reason that rural students are preferred over urban ones is because they are more likely to fill the void of doctors in rural areas. This makes them more, not less, desirable, than the urban candidates - this is not an issue of educational disadvantage, but one where society needs to select particular doctors to meet its own healthcare needs - and people with a rural background are more likely to fulfill that need, and are therefore stronger candidates regardless of mark.

    MSO is not the healthcare setting, and so, you should be prepared for a dose of reality, rather than empathy, if you ask here.
     
  12. stateofmind

    stateofmind medhopeful 2016

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    Thank you for this baseless personal attack, please note that you have no idea who I am.

    I never said Batman made a point, I do not enjoy assuming things about anyone's opinions or character (unlike some). I am merely pointing out a different perspective that should be considered, as Batman did say "People getting 95 and 96 ATARS get into medicine just because they have lived in a rural area. People like me who live in urban areas are forced to produce higher ATAR score (98+). So please, don't say that other applicants are better because a lot of times they just aren't better."
    the use of "just because" in this statement seems to indicate a lack of understanding of the struggles which may face rural candidates (even if this isn't the reason why they land interviews)

    In another of his statements: "In fact, I just met a doctor today who achieved an ATAR of 98.2 and got in to medicine. Just another example of the fault in the selection process in terms of ATAR scores," he seems to imply that his aforementioned point about the distinction between urban and rural candidates is also a "fault"

    this is just how his view comes across. I will not be assumptive about his opinion, as you seem to have been about mine. Care to note that in my previous message, I have used speculative rather than absolute terms as I am in no place to say what right or wrong. If anyone else feels that my offering of a different perspective is a personal attack, I apologise as that was not my intention.

    And yes, I still believe that if an individual did in fact show ignorance to issues of social inequity while applying for a degree with a focus on social inequity, they are probably not suitable. I never specifically said anyone did this, it was merely a suggestion. Furthermore, I never saw anything "malicious" about batman's statements, he is entitled to an opinion, your belief that I may have is quite laughable considering once again the fact that you know nothing about me. Here's a fact: I missed out on a JCU interview too :p
     
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  13. batman_99

    batman_99 New Member

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    This is exactly the point I was trying to make. I don't think that I'm more deserving of studying medicine at JCU than any other rural applicant. All I'm saying is that getting into medicine (which would eventually lead on to dealing with people's lives) is very tough for urban applicants, compared to the rural quota. Again, I am very much passionate about JCU's medical course. I don't believe I deserve it more than others, but at the same time if it is a question about my passion for a course that emphasises social inequity then please hear me out. In spite of undergoing a number of interviews for different universities (of which a few I have received offers for medicine), I am still on this forum talking about JCU's medical course and their interview process.
     
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  14. cc101

    cc101 Regular Member

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    full agree with you. many people pay to get their applications done.
     
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  15. batman_99

    batman_99 New Member

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    Since when did I say that the doctor that I met went to JCU? You have simply made an assumption about this. There was no rural emphasis in that university. It was just based off pure marks. I was stating that there must be a fault in the selection process somewhere....considering she went to Sydney uni... Anyway, all I'm saying is please don't discourage or show your lack of empathy to those who are aspiring medical students. Our queries about the selection process does not mean that we are undeserving or not passionate about medicine.
     
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  16. Mana

    Mana Registrar Administrar

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    I don't see this anywhere in the post, where exactly was the assumption made that the doctor went to JCU?

    Nope, not your call to make. There are loads of students who have a rural background who attend metropolitan universities to get their degrees because guess what, that's where all the large universities are.

    Your ignorance of the selection process, however, does mean that you don't have a lot of credibility when talking about the selection process, especially if you are going to make a claim that there was a fault in the selection process at the university resulting in this person getting in.
     
  17. batman_99

    batman_99 New Member

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    I'm not saying I deserve a place just because I may have a higher ATAR score. All I'm saying is that urban applicants have to score significantly higher then the average rural applicant. You do realise that many unis give out bonded places to applicants? The applicants then practise as doctors in rural communities for a set amount of time.

    Please read my latest message on the forum a couple of times. I have done enough research that led me to be offered of a place in medicine in other unis - I don't need your guidance on that. As I said, JCU's medical course is appealing to me and that is reason why I am on this forum in the first place. Anyways, this conversation is just a waste of time.
     
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  18. Rissa11

    Rissa11 New Member

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    agreed. let's all drop it and go our separate ways :) good luck with the major offer round batman_99, no doubt you will make an awesome med student.

    of course buddy, apologies for offending you! we all have our own story huh. So I wish you all the very best!

    And Mana, thank you for shedding some light on this topic. If you have any advice on the application process i.e. things that JCU is looking for (anything but rurality since I can't change where I live anytime soon), that would be top notch. So we can try improve things next time. Thank you!!


    P.S. I thought this forum was for advice and support. My bad. Also dose of reality works better when delivered in a friendlier way.

    Goodnight dudes and dudettes. Peace and love :cool:
     
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  19. Mana

    Mana Registrar Administrar

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    We are all aware of the BMP program (did you seriously think that I don't know about this?), and no, it doesn't solve the rural doctor shortage because BMP students largely return to the cities after completing their return of contract; furthermore, the return of service is now one year, and simply doing your internship in that area now satisfies the return on contract clause if you commence this year. Another significant proportion of the BMP contract holders simply pay out their contract instead of fulfilling it.

    The rural healthcare services don't need new junior doctors - they need trained consultant doctors that can practice autonomously, rather than more peons to work for the few that exist. The BMP program has widely been regarded as a failure in this sense.

    Not sure why you keep posting then.
     
  20. husaya

    husaya New Member

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    The real question is do you realise that these rural communities don't need doctors practicing as interns for their designated 1 year bonded contract? They need experienced doctors who stay for years and years, not new intern medical graduates that are only there to fulfil their bonded requirement. In this need they have turned to lowering the requirements for rural applicants - as it is clear that applicants with a greater rural background have a greater 'chance' at staying rural and working there for many years. This is what Australia needs as a whole, and this could be the reason why you may have been rejected by JCU (who places a heavy importance on rural health gap bridging, etc) even if you wrote a killer application. I know it might feel bad to not even get a chance at a JCU interview because you technically got a higher atar/gpa or whatever than an applying rural candidate, but thats what happens when medical graduates flock to urban centres over rural/remote communities.

    What I don't understand is how you and a few posters here cannot grasp that (and I AM sorry if this sounds harsh but its true) the world doesn't revolve around you or what you want and that often we will be disappointed in life (trust me lol I already completed a Bachelors degree and then job searched for 6+ months and settled for a retail position cos there were no jobs in my field/city). We are a large country that needs health gaps filled and rural applicants/graduates are one strategy at combatting these gaps. There is nothing you can do to change this except for going and working in these communities yourself - its actually a good thing that they are lowering the requirements for rural applicants IMO. This might actually lead to some good health changes down the line as we already have plenty of medical graduates each year so we should now be churning out more that will go and STAY rural.
     

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