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Master of Nursing (2years) or Bachelor of Nursing (3years)?

nurse2017

Lurker
Dear readers,

My name is David and my long term goal is to work as a registered nurse in the hospital or aged care setting. I am writing to get your opinion on a dilemma I have with respect to university study.

Should I enter a Master of Nursing program or a Bachelor of Nursing program? The Master program is 1 year shorter than the Bachelor program (so it is 2 years long) and it accepts anyone with a previous degree.

The reason why this is a dilemma is because I am worried that I will not have enough work experience to make me competitive in securing a position in a Graduate Nurse program. Many advertisements for Graduate Nurse programs will stipulate that work experience outside of clinical placements is “desirable”. I am thinking that if I choose the Bachelor of Nursing program, I will have one extra year to get a job as an Assistant in Nursing or as an Aged Carer. I might not get this opportunity in the Master program owing to its shorter duration and heavier study load.

I will be very grateful for your opinions. At present, my relevant work experience is 1) First Aid volunteer for St. John Ambulance Service and 2) tour guide for a large museum in Sydney. Are these enough to make me competitive for the Graduate Nurse program assuming that I also have good academic grades and clinical reports.

Have a great day,

David
 

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rustyedges

Moderator
Moderator
Dear readers,

My name is David and my long term goal is to work as a registered nurse in the hospital or aged care setting. I am writing to get your opinion on a dilemma I have with respect to university study.

Should I enter a Master of Nursing program or a Bachelor of Nursing program? The Master program is 1 year shorter than the Bachelor program (so it is 2 years long) and it accepts anyone with a previous degree.

The reason why this is a dilemma is because I am worried that I will not have enough work experience to make me competitive in securing a position in a Graduate Nurse program. Many advertisements for Graduate Nurse programs will stipulate that work experience outside of clinical placements is “desirable”. I am thinking that if I choose the Bachelor of Nursing program, I will have one extra year to get a job as an Assistant in Nursing or as an Aged Carer. I might not get this opportunity in the Master program owing to its shorter duration and heavier study load.

I will be very grateful for your opinions. At present, my relevant work experience is 1) First Aid volunteer for St. John Ambulance Service and 2) tour guide for a large museum in Sydney. Are these enough to make me competitive for the Graduate Nurse program assuming that I also have good academic grades and clinical reports.

Have a great day,

David
Hey David, sounds like you already have a good amount of work experience, especially considering the majority of other nursing students will be straight out of highschool, and won't have a lot. A masters may also make you more competitive too. My advice would be to apply for whatever course(s) you want to do, and see where you go from there.
 

Mana

there are no stupid questions, only people
Administrator
Dear readers,

My name is David and my long term goal is to work as a registered nurse in the hospital or aged care setting. I am writing to get your opinion on a dilemma I have with respect to university study.

Should I enter a Master of Nursing program or a Bachelor of Nursing program? The Master program is 1 year shorter than the Bachelor program (so it is 2 years long) and it accepts anyone with a previous degree.
I'd take the Masters every time provided the uni fees were similar (i.e. the Masters isn't a FFP place). If you did the Masters and somehow you wanted to also so some AIN work etc, being able to do it full time helps a lot more than not being able to, and you can just do that right after you finish your Masters if you don't happen to get into a position right after those two years.

Other than cost or location of the degree, I cannot see any logical reason why you would take the 3 year course over the 2 year one if you qualified for both.
 

Megs

Member
I've met a few people who are doing the Masters program with previous BA or geography degrees and although it is hard work they all really enjoy it. I think mature learners do well in the Masters program because there is less emphasis on the basics like how to talk to a patient. It's presumed graduates with life experience who want to get into health care are relatively good communicators whereas teaching an 18 year old takes more time so there is more emphasis on patient communication in the earlier years. By the sounds of it, volunteering in the ambulance sector, gives you a bit of a head start on this sort of situation. I think doing a two year program so you can get into the job would be best, at the end of the day, the job is what you want to do :)
 

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