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MD vs MBBS

Hi all.

Just wondering, what's the difference between a course such as Bachelor of Science/Doctor of Medicine at USyd vs Bachelor of Medicine/Bachelor of Surgery at Adelaide? I'm not talking about the different Universities styles of teaching but rather the difference between obtaining an 'MD' from USyd vs 'MBBS' at Adelaide.

Tl;dr. What's the difference between MD and MBBS?
 

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chinaski

Regular Member
Zero in a practical sense. Both are professionally viewed equally after graduation, and qualify you equally for exactly the same job.
 

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dotwingz

Irregular Member
Valued Member
IIRC The government banned domestic full fee places at an undergraduate level but not at a postgraduate/masters level (which is MD). This allows MD schools such as USyd/UMelb to offer Full Fee Places alongside their Commonwealth Supported Places. This is the only """technical""" difference but only really matters from the universities perspective. Realistically this was a primary reason for FFP uni's like UniMelb to introduce the MD and a bit of a nomenclature war has started since then
 

chinaski

Regular Member
^^ Absolutely, yes. To clarify for the OP, my "nope" was in a clinical context: there is no difference technically or practically between one course name and the other from the perspective of employers. TL,DR; one is not better than the other, so don't stress.
 

yuzzy

Member
To give an overview of the different admission types

Group 1 - Schools with graduate entry into their MD courses: UWol, Deakin, ANU, Notre Dame Sydney/Fremantle, MQ.

Group 2 - Graduate entry but pre-offer a portion of MD places to school leavers, called provisional: USyd, UMelb, UQ, Griffith, Flinders, UWA.

Group 3 - Undergrad schools with MD degrees but sequential after a BMed (i.e. direct entry to BMed, no direct entry to MD like the graduate schools): UNSW, JMP, WSU, Monash, Bond.

Group 4 - Undergrad schools with MBBS bachelor degrees: JCU, Adelaide, UTas, Curtin.

In round numbers there are about 3,000 CSP/BMP places a year comprised of 1500 graduate entry, 500 provisional offers to school leavers, 1000 groups 3&4. And before anyone asks, MBBS is a better degree since they teach you med over 5-6 years vs the rushed 4-year MD ;)
When looking for a job is it harder to do so with an MD vs an MBBS? Or is MBBS "better" because its a bit more manageable?
 

ucatboy

Regular Member
Valued Member
When looking for a job is it harder to do so with an MD vs an MBBS? Or is MBBS "better" because its a bit more manageable?
No difference qualification-wise, difficulty will probably depend on other things. Also, the number of MBBS degrees is gradually thinning over the years, with the "x science/studies + MD" format taking its place. Adelaide was just about to transition from MBBS to Bachelor of Clinical Studies + MD for 2021 entry, but they've pushed it back until at least 2022, my guess is because of COVID.
 

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chinaski

Regular Member
Worth pointing out that the graduate entry 4-year MDs were formerly 4-year MBBS courses. The length and "compression" of the courses are not a reflection of or dependent on the degree title.
 
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