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Med/Dent Interview Preparation

Rhidian

New Member
Hi Everybody,

I have trawled through the interview questions prep threads and grabbed the all the practice questions I can find and put them into a document. Sometimes the threads can get a little messy so I thought since I had gone through the effort you may as well reap the benefits. It starts off with your usual "why do you want to study at this school" kind of questions and finishes with ethical dilemmas and the like.

Here is the link: Medstudents online .docx

Feel free to use this new thread to discuss the questions and anything else related.
 

Myst

New Member
Hi Everybody,

I have trawled through the interview questions prep threads and grabbed the all the practice questions I can find and put them into a document. Sometimes the threads can get a little messy so I thought since I had gone through the effort you may as well reap the benefits. It starts off with your usual "why do you want to study at this school" kind of questions and finishes with ethical dilemmas and the like
That was nice of you! Will def help everyone =)
 

Halcyon

Genius, Billionaire, Playboy, Philanthropist...
Hi Everybody,

I have trawled through the interview questions prep threads and grabbed the all the practice questions I can find and put them into a document. Sometimes the threads can get a little messy so I thought since I had gone through the effort you may as well reap the benefits. It starts off with your usual "why do you want to study at this school" kind of questions and finishes with ethical dilemmas and the like.

Here is the link: Medstudents online .docx

Feel free to use this new thread to discuss the questions and anything else related.
What a top bloke. :D
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
Just wondering for those with both dent and med at Adelaide, will there be a possibility of conflict of interest between the two interviews if the same people end up interviewing you for both? Then they might have grounds to terminate both applications because they don't think you are motivated enough for one or the other?
We have never heard of such concerns. It's most unlikely you get the same interviewers and besides, it'd be crazy of them to think that about applying for both.
 

Q3

Regular Member
Just wondering for those with both dent and med at Adelaide, will there be a possibility of conflict of interest between the two interviews if the same people end up interviewing you for both? Then they might have grounds to terminate both applications because they don't think you are motivated enough for one or the other?
I see where you are coming from with your concern. To the extent that applying for both could limit your answers, eg what will you do if you don't get into med?, it could pose a minor issue but even if you got the same person I don't think it would matter that much.

And it definitely wouldn't be grounds for terminating an application.

But I definitely see where you are coming from, because you don't want it to to seem as though dentistry is your fall back option.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
But I definitely see where you are coming from, because you don't want it to to seem as though dentistry is your fall back option.
Naahh ... the UNSW Admissions team, and I believe same at other unis too, are at pain to point out your chance of getting a place is generally low and actively encourage you to have a fallback option.
 

Q3

Regular Member
Naahh ... the UNSW Admissions team, and I believe same at other unis too, are at pain to point out your chance of getting a place is generally low and actively encourage you to have a fallback option.
I agree with this and that it is a good thing, I think it is unrealistic for anybody to have their eye on any goal and insist that it has to happen. Personally I think that's neurotic, obsessive and unhealthy. It's great that Unsw encourages having a fall back.

But at the same time unis stress so much that they want people who are passionate, so it makes people feel as though having a fall back is akin to lacking passion. I don't agree that fall back equals lack of passion but I can see why people would think that. Anyhow, I don't want to steer this thread off course. Lol
 

Mana

Registrar
Administrar
As an interviewer, I highly encourage all applicants to medicine to have a well thought out backup plan for the eventuality that you don't get in.

It shows that you have good insight into the system and does not diminish your passion for it one iota. I guarantee that having a good backup plan can score highly even if the backup is not medically related. It's much better to state this backup than to say you are going to just keep trying (this is unrealistic) or go do something for the purposes of getting higher scores to get in (this is short-sighted).
 

faysapprentice

Regular Member
As an interviewer, I highly encourage all applicants to medicine to have a well thought out backup plan for the eventuality that you don't get in.

It shows that you have good insight into the system and does not diminish your passion for it one iota. I guarantee that having a good backup plan can score highly even if the backup is not medically related. It's much better to state this backup than to say you are going to just keep trying (this is unrealistic) or go do something for the purposes of getting higher scores to get in (this is short-sighted).
if you're in a provisional medicine course, but still did umat for to try for unis in your home state, should i just tell them that im sorta already in med even if they reject me or do I just say that id do gamsat etc?
 

Mana

Registrar
Administrar
if you're in a provisional medicine course, but still did umat for to try for unis in your home state, should i just tell them that im sorta already in med even if they reject me or do I just say that id do gamsat etc?
Nothing wrong with being honest. If your fall back position is that you have a guaranteed place in another state, you can state this; you can then also state why being in your home state is important to you (strong community ties, the importance of family support, how awesome this uni is, etc) and you can ALSO finally show your insight by saying that if you hypothetically did not have a fall back position in medicine you would do X as an alternative career. All bases covered!
 

faysapprentice

Regular Member
Nothing wrong with being honest. If your fall back position is that you have a guaranteed place in another state, you can state this; you can then also state why being in your home state is important to you (strong community ties, the importance of family support, etc) and you can ALSO finally show your insight by saying that if you hypothetically did not have a fall back position you would do X as an alternative career. All bases covered!
oh beatiful thankyou for the insight!
 

biom

Regular Member
Supreme Overlord of the Chatbox
oh beatiful thankyou for the insight!
Really good answer from Mana. It covers all the bases.

As a general rule, you take a big risk if you attempt to deceive (strong word) any interviewer. The likelihood that you will be tripped-up by a follow-on question is high. If that happens, it is very hard for an interviewer to have a positive impression of you.

There is absolutely no need to highlight all of your perceived weaknesses or flaws..... but don't tell porkies.
 

faysapprentice

Regular Member
Really good answer from Mana. It covers all the bases.

As a general rule, you take a big risk if you attempt to deceive (strong word) any interviewer. The likelihood that you will be tripped-up by a follow-on question is high. If that happens, it is very hard for an interviewer to have a positive impression of you.

There is absolutely no need to highlight all of your perceived weaknesses or flaws..... but don't tell porkies.
yeah yeah i wholeheartedly agree - i was just wondering because i dont want to come across as cocky by basically insinuating the fact that im already in med
 

Bell210X

New Member
As an interviewer, I highly encourage all applicants to medicine to have a well thought out backup plan for the eventuality that you don't get in.

It shows that you have good insight into the system and does not diminish your passion for it one iota. I guarantee that having a good backup plan can score highly even if the backup is not medically related. It's much better to state this backup than to say you are going to just keep trying (this is unrealistic) or go do something for the purposes of getting higher scores to get in (this is short-sighted).
Just on this, if I am asked a question about a backup and I tell them the truth - which is that if I don't get into med this time I will continue with my current degree AND keep trying - will this seem bad in terms of what you've said ("this is unrealistic") ?
 

biom

Regular Member
Supreme Overlord of the Chatbox
Just on this, if I am asked a question about a backup and I tell them the truth - which is that if I don't get into med this time I will continue with my current degree AND keep trying - will this seem bad in terms of what you've said ("this is unrealistic") ?
Try and anticipate what the follow-up question might be. Perhaps, "is that realistic?" or "For how long would you keep trying?" or ... build the response into your original answer. Eg "I will try one more time because of x. In case this doesn't work out, my plan would be to do y".

This shows that you have considered the question, appreciate reality and are not blinded by "but I want to be a doctor"
 

Mana

Registrar
Administrar
Just on this, if I am asked a question about a backup and I tell them the truth - which is that if I don't get into med this time I will continue with my current degree AND keep trying - will this seem bad in terms of what you've said ("this is unrealistic") ?
I think this is a good answer provided you have a good rationale for your current degree choice. If you are studying nursing for example, you would explain that you would finish your nursing degree which would then enable your career in that field. It's then perfectly reasonable to say you would try again for medicine knowing your plan B is set in stone.

On the other hand, if your current degree is hard to justify as a backup in and of itself (e.g. you are doing something very general, like an Arts degree) then you will need to have some idea about your career trajectory ('I am going to use my economics degree to find work in the financial sector as an advisor and perhaps later to manage investments for people to help them gain financial security').
 

DocX

New Member
Hi there, similarly to the above question in relation to having a dentistry and medicine application at the same university, how would you approach scenarios where the Med interviewer asks ‘so why is it that you have chosen medicine as your preferred career choice?’, yet then in your interview with dentistry afterwards at the same university, the dentistry interviewer may ask ‘why is it that you’re so passionate to do dentistry as a career?’ Or something along those lines. Personally, Medicine is my number one goal and passion, and dent would be my fall back. I do not want them to know this when interviewing as they will rule me out immediately, but I do not want to lie and be dishonest with my responses. Any further elaborations would be appreciated, thank you :)
 

karenh

Regular Member
For the "what if you don't get into med this year" question at an interview, I would honestly go to UQ if I can't get into med elsewhere, unless I somehow totally bomb out and don't scrape a 95 (99 with bonus points) needed at UQ. Is it even wise to mention UQ specifically (not even in my home state)?

Or are the interviewers looking for what I'd do if I don't get into UQ?
 

Bell210X

New Member
I think this is a good answer provided you have a good rationale for your current degree choice. If you are studying nursing for example, you would explain that you would finish your nursing degree which would then enable your career in that field. It's then perfectly reasonable to say you would try again for medicine knowing your plan B is set in stone.

On the other hand, if your current degree is hard to justify as a backup in and of itself (e.g. you are doing something very general, like an Arts degree) then you will need to have some idea about your career trajectory ('I am going to use my economics degree to find work in the financial sector as an advisor and perhaps later to manage investments for people to help them gain financial security').
I'm currently doing a B Psych (w Hons), with a second major in anatomy & histology (chosen because I find the body so incredible).
I was always conflicted between pursuing med or psych, so it is genuinely my backup, but it requires post grad study for the career I would want. So would I mention this? It does lead to specific post grad study which leads to a specific career.
And should I leave out my second major?
 
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