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Medical Interviewer FAQ!

I Can't Hear U

Hufflepuff, WBU?
This might be a little silly, but if I mention in my interview that I'd potentially like to work for a few months/years in a rural area as a doctor in the future, will this impact my likelihood of receiving a BMP, as opposed to unbonded? I genuinely would like to experience working rurally in the future, but I'd obviously like to not be legally bound by a BMP. Thanks!
 

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medhopeful2001x

New Member
This might be a little silly, but if I mention in my interview that I'd potentially like to work for a few months/years in a rural area as a doctor in the future, will this impact my likelihood of receiving a BMP, as opposed to unbonded? I genuinely would like to experience working rurally in the future, but I'd obviously like to not be legally bound by a BMP. Thanks!
I don't think the interview works that way, in that you're graded according to a set scoring system, and when allocating places they don't have your specific responses at hand. (Correct me if I'm wrong!)
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
This might be a little silly, but if I mention in my interview that I'd potentially like to work for a few months/years in a rural area as a doctor in the future, will this impact my likelihood of receiving a BMP, as opposed to unbonded? I genuinely would like to experience working rurally in the future, but I'd obviously like to not be legally bound by a BMP. Thanks!
If your scores qualify for an unbonded place, even if the offer team have access to what you said in the interview they cannot downgrade you to bonded. That would be contrary to their documented selection criteria/formula and subject to legal actions.
 

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whoartthou

New Member
Hey whoartthou, What are some motivations to do medicine that sound a too cliche, or would seem as a write off to you? Other than the obvious 'money, prestige, hardest thing to get into etc.etc.' what other responses make you doubt their true motivations. What seems a little off and why?
Most answers will sound cliche but that is fine. Make it your own personal story. It also depends on how you deliver it and the overall feel of the response. If you want specific advice I would recommend getting someone with experience to critique your response. Most student's answers will be fine but usually they can be tweaked to be better. Apart from the obvious black and white no nos, many things will fall into the grey zone and it all depends on word choices, how you phrase things and how you deliver it.

For example "My maths teacher makes us work from the textbook all the time. This is horrendously boring and no one likes him in our class" vs "I enjoy maths the least because unfortunately, there is little engagement from the teacher. I understand he/she may have an "old classroom" perception of how lessons should be conducted however, our class would benefit from interactive lessons involving less textbook work".

This might be a little silly, but if I mention in my interview that I'd potentially like to work for a few months/years in a rural area as a doctor in the future, will this impact my likelihood of receiving a BMP, as opposed to unbonded? I genuinely would like to experience working rurally in the future, but I'd obviously like to not be legally bound by a BMP. Thanks!
The interviewers do not know your preference so it doesn't matter.

This might be a little silly, but if I mention in my interview that I'd potentially like to work for a few months/years in a rural area as a doctor in the future, will this impact my likelihood of receiving a BMP, as opposed to unbonded? I genuinely would like to experience working rurally in the future, but I'd obviously like to not be legally bound by a BMP. Thanks!
If you want to work in rural areas as a doctor that's great! However, I am skeptical at most answers to this question as that is what is "expected". Unless you have done previous work in rural communities this holds little value to your answer so I would not even rate it as an average answer unless you can convince me otherwise. The best testament to your values is what you have done in the past. If you truly want to work in a rural area you would have some kind of experience otherwise I will find it hard to believe you.

In that case, what would be an appropriate answer if I knew my academic/ucat marks were good enough to guarantee a medicine offer at the non-interview universities. Should I just say that to the interviewers (Which doesn't really answer their question), or go into a hypothetical explanation of what'd I do otherwise? Thanks!
Having good enough marks doesn't mean you should do medicine. I think you answered your own question here. If this is your attitude then you should not be doing medicine and I would discourage you from doing it. The question asks for your motivation to pursue medicine outside of academic pursuits.
 
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blizzard

Old Member
Having good enough marks doesn't mean you should do medicine. I think you answered your own question here. If this is your attitude then you should not be doing medicine and I would discourage you from doing it. The question asks for your motivation to pursue medicine outside of academic pursuits.
The hypothetical question I was responding to was "What are you going to do if you get rejected from all medical universities", not about your motivations for doing medicine. I was just wondering about what to respond with if I already know that I would be able to make it into one university (Due to their selection process) - it's been answered now though.
 

whoartthou

New Member
The hypothetical question I was responding to was "What are you going to do if you get rejected from all medical universities", not about your motivations for doing medicine. I was just wondering about what to respond with if I already know that I would be able to make it into one university (Due to their selection process) - it's been answered now though.
Oh I see. If you already know you will make it, it doesn't pertain to the question because the question states a specific condition. It also comes across as arrogant so I would not look favourably at you at all and probably be looking at failing you.
 
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ponyswordz

New Member
Hi,I wanted to ask 2 questions. One about acting stations and another about group interview stations (if they exist?).

In a typical MMI, you get a scenario and discuss the ethics, professionalism, creativeness of proposed suggestions and etc. For an acting station, what particular traits or behaviours in particular tend to be emphasised as desirable? What constitutes being professional and also whether or not you are qualified to perform a particular task?

I heard from some students in previous years that group interview stations exist where 5 or so interviewees are grouped together in the same room and discuss some topics. How should you go about in approaching this form of interview (if they even exist)?

Thanks!!
 
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whoartthou

New Member
Hi,I wanted to ask 2 questions. One about acting stations and another about group interview stations (if they exist?).

In a typical MMI, you get a scenario and discuss the ethics, professionalism, creativeness of proposed suggestions and etc. For an acting station, what particular traits or behaviours in particular tend to be emphasised as desirable? What constitutes being professional and also whether or not you are qualified to perform a particular task?

I heard from some students in previous years that group interview stations exist where 5 or so interviewees are grouped together in the same room and discuss some topics. How should you go about in approaching this form of interview (if they even exist)?

Thanks!!
Different acting stations will test different traits/skills. Different universities will use different marking criterias which could also be tested in a scenario situations. Obviously communication skills are emphasised in the acting scenarios. Students need to understand there is no "desirable" qualities or set proforma you should be using for every single question. You can have a generic approach to questions but if you pigeon hole yourself, you will not do well. So if you go into an interview with this mindset you won't be reaching your potential.
If you want to ask specifics ask your question in the context of a scenario.

Group interviews are not that common to be honest. I do not have a special approach to it as it would be question dependent. However, you don't want to dominate or offend anyone with your responses.
 

Winger42

New Member
That's very nice of you, whoartthou, to answer all these questions - thanks! I've got a question. Which interview questions generally tend to be answered badly and why?
 

Eliden

New Member
I just received an email from MedEntry regarding their Excellence Prize. Whilst I missed out on 1st, 2nd or 3rd prize, apparently my total UCAT score was high enough to earn me a partial scholarship to their interview session. They state "We are pleased to offer you $255 off your session (that is, you pay only $190 for your session instead of the full cost of $445)."

That sounds like a great discount, but $190 still seems like a lot. Has anyone done a MedEntry interview session before and is it wort the best part of $200?
 

chinaski

Regular Member
I just received an email from MedEntry regarding their Excellence Prize. Whilst I missed out on 1st, 2nd or 3rd prize, apparently my total UCAT score was high enough to earn me a partial scholarship to their interview session. They state "We are pleased to offer you $255 off your session (that is, you pay only $190 for your session instead of the full cost of $445)."

That sounds like a great discount, but $190 still seems like a lot. Has anyone done a MedEntry interview session before and is it wort the best part of $200?
Was this an unsolicited email? How did they know your UCAT score? Are you sure they don't send this "partial scholarship" to everyone on their mailing list? "Partial scholarship" sounds like "sale on our product" to me.
 

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Eliden

New Member
Was this an unsolicited email? How did they know your UCAT score? Are you sure they don't send this "partial scholarship" to everyone on their mailing list? "Partial scholarship" sounds like "sale on our product" to me.
They held a competition in early August, the MedEntry Excellence Prize. They asked ME students with high scores to send them a screenshot of their Pearson score report to enter. Now, to redeem my discount, I must apparently disclose my Pearson login details for them to verify my score.

1st prize was $300 cash plus a spot on their interview training. 2nd prize might have been $150 cash, can't remember now. And 3rd I believe was just the free interview training
 

chinaski

Regular Member
They held a competition in early August, the MedEntry Excellence Prize. They asked ME students with high scores to send them a screenshot of their Pearson score report to enter. Now, to redeem my discount, I must apparently disclose my Pearson login details for them to verify my score.
Up to you, of course - but be aware of what's potentially in it for them. If they cherry-pick people who already stand a higher likelihood of getting into med school on account of the advantage a high UCAT, if you get into med school, they can then attribute your success to their interview course (even though they've no proof that their course actually helped you - you may have gotten in regardless) - you're being used as marketing fodder.
 

ucatboy

Regular Member
Got an email too from MedEntry - not in the top three either like Eliden but MedEntry deemed my score pretty good and gave me an interview training session.
Does anyone have any experience with the MedEntry Adelaide Uni course?
 

Eliden

New Member
Up to you, of course - but be aware of what's potentially in it for them. If they cherry-pick people who already stand a higher likelihood of getting into med school on account of the advantage a high UCAT, if you get into med school, they can then attribute your success to their interview course (even though they've no proof that their course actually helped you - you may have gotten in regardless) - you're being used as marketing fodder.
Yes that is very true, good point. I am reasonably confident I will interview well. I'm mature aged, articulate, have lots of life experience, regularly teach classes to rooms of 30 or 40 people so not easily rattled. If it weren't for the lure of a seemingly large discount I would absolutely not consider wasting money on a course. I'd like to know if anyone has found it to be really, reaaaaally helpful/unmissable?
 
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apk22

New Member
I’m just wondering if it would be acceptable to answer some of the interview questions with experience from my gap year? I know that I’m still classified as a school leaver but is it possible that the universities may frown upon me as a gap year student? (Given that I’ve done a lot of solo travelling and volunteering in this year off)
 

chinaski

Regular Member
I’m just wondering if it would be acceptable to answer some of the interview questions with experience from my gap year? I know that I’m still classified as a school leaver but is it possible that the universities may frown upon me as a gap year student? (Given that I’ve done a lot of solo travelling and volunteering in this year off)
It's a mistake to think that a gap year (or even gap years, pleural) should/would be regarded negatively. Holding the idea of going straight from high school and into a medical degree as an ideal is the flaw here.
 

apk22

New Member
It's a mistake to think that a gap year (or even gap years, pleural) should/would be regarded negatively. Holding the idea of going straight from high school and into a medical degree as an ideal is the flaw here.
I quite like that response ahaha. Thank you!
 

pi

Junior doctor
Admodistrator
I’m just wondering if it would be acceptable to answer some of the interview questions with experience from my gap year? I know that I’m still classified as a school leaver but is it possible that the universities may frown upon me as a gap year student? (Given that I’ve done a lot of solo travelling and volunteering in this year off)
As long as it's relevant, it's fine. For example, interviewers don't want to hear about a Contiki tour to Asia where you "found yourself", gained a new collection of elephant print yoga pants, and helped build a sub-standard wall for a house for those less fortunate ;)
 

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