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Medical School Grades

johnno123

New Member
Hi guys,

Just out of curiosity, how do most Australian Medical Schools grade their students? Do they use a pass/fail system or do they actually be more specific by awarding HD/D/CR/P/F etc grades?
 

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Perplex

Moderator
Moderator
Hi guys,

Just out of curiosity, how do most Australian Medical Schools grade their students? Do they use a pass/fail system or do they actually be more specific by awarding HD/D/CR/P/F etc grades?

It depends on the uni. Some universities operate with a pass/fail system, some tell you your quartile rank. Other unis use the traditional grading system that applies to all other courses (e.g. P/C/D/HD). Not really sure whether there's a majority.
 

johnno123

New Member
It depends on the uni. Some universities operate with a pass/fail system, some tell you your quartile rank. Other unis use the traditional grading system that applies to all other courses (e.g. P/C/D/HD). Not really sure whether there's a majority.
Thanks for that. What are the benefits of obtaining high uni marks during medical school compared to just scraping passes? I heard that when you apply for a speciality, the colleges don't consider uni marks at all.
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
Thanks for that. What are the benefits of obtaining high uni marks during medical school compared to just scraping passes? I heard that when you apply for a speciality, the colleges don't consider uni marks at all.
Depends which state. In Vic if you get a crap z-score you're likely to get a crap intern location.
I believe in WA intern allocations are merit-based as well (although there isn't much difference between the three major tertiary centres they are allocated to).
 

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chinaski

Regular Member
Thanks for that. What are the benefits of obtaining high uni marks during medical school compared to just scraping passes?
Can you see there might be a benefit to having a high level of skill and knowledge, given that you will be graduating into a job wherein you literally have to take responsibility for the life and well-being of others? See where aiming for mediocrity might be a bad idea there?
 

johnno123

New Member
Depends which state. In Vic if you get a crap z-score you're likely to get a crap intern location.
I believe in WA intern allocations are merit-based as well (although there isn't much difference between the three major tertiary centres they are allocated to).
Okay makes sense. Thank you.
Apologies if this has already been discussed but are medical students which are Australian citizens guaranteed an intern position upon graduating from medical school? What happens in the situation where someone does not receive an intern position?
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
Okay makes sense. Thank you.
Apologies if this has already been discussed but are medical students which are Australian citizens guaranteed an intern position upon graduating from medical school? What happens in the situation where someone does not receive an intern position?
On paper all CSP/BMP grads are guaranteed an internship by the COAG agreement between the federal & state governments.

In practice, in the last few years not only they but also all Aus full-fee grads got internships, plus about half to 2/3rd of the international-student grads.
 

johnno123

New Member
Can you see there might be a benefit to having a high level of skill and knowledge, given that you will be graduating into a job wherein you literally have to take responsibility for the life and well-being of others? See where aiming for mediocrity might be a bad idea there?
I totally understand where you're coming from and I definitely agree. No student should enter medical school with the aim of scraping passes and not performing to the best of their ability. However, I still believe pre-med students should have some idea of how medical courses are delivered, graded, assessed etc, hence why I am asking these questions.
 

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chinaski

Regular Member
However, I still believe pre-med students should have some idea of how medical courses are delivered, graded, assessed etc, hence why I am asking these questions.
I don't disagree with you asking those questions. I was responding your enquiry about what might motivate a student to do better than a bare pass throughout med school. Ultimately one's intention throughout med school should be to graduate as well-rounded, mature and knowledgeable as one can be. That might not be seen as a direct "benefit" as you put it, but essentially it should serve as your main motivation to aim high.
 

whoartthou

New Member
Unless you want to specialise in dermatology where they actually heavily favour you if you are the dux of your university cohort. Otherwise, there isn't an obvious benefit from obtaining high marks like chinaski said. However, I have to argue that traditional forms of teaching does not constitute the makings of a good doctor. Meaning just because you have lower marks doesn't make you an inferior doctor and at the end of the day it comes down to your attitude. Being a doctor is also far from just memorising information as there is a patient aspect. I have seen many doctors with "high marks" have abysmally poor rapport with patients. I had mediocre marks but my patients love me and will continue to come back to see me. I am more a pragmatic type and would rather learn through experience and doing the work so being a doctor now helps from that perspective. Just remember everyone is different so don't conform yourself to one mould.
 

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