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Medicine Related Books and Novels

waterstone

New Member
Has anyone read any inspiring/motivational books written by physicians or by surgeons ? I read How to do a liver transplant by Kelee Slater.

Nice one, I must say.
 

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Oxycodone

Auckland MBChB VI
This past summer I read "do no harm" by English Neurosurgeon Henry marsh I'd highly recommend it, it gave great insight into what an actual neurosurgeons life is like. I also read "when the air hits your brain" by American Neurosurgeon Frank Vertosick, it honestly was AMAZING i loved every bit of it. He goes into the struggles one must live with being a neurosurgeon, and all the patients which emotionally impacted him most. Again, highly recommended.
 

arg

New Member
If you like something philosophical, I recommend "The consolations of philosophy" by Alain De botton.
 

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Kasia Smith

kasiunut
Novels:

Cutting for Stone
by Abraham Verghese
This sprawling, 50-year epic begins with a touch of alchemy: the birth of conjoined twins to an Indian nun in an Ethiopian hospital in 1954. The likely father, a British surgeon, flees upon the mother’s death, and the (now separated) baby boys are adopted by a loving Indian couple who run the hospital. Filled with mystical scenes and deeply felt characters–and opening a fascinating window onto the Third World–Cutting for Stone is an underdog and a winner. Shades of Slumdog Millionaire.

The House of God by Samuel Shem
Struggling with grueling hours and sudden life-and-death responsibilities, Basch and his colleagues, under the leadership of their rule-breaking senior resident known only as the Fat Man, must learn not only how to be fine doctors but, eventually, good human beings.

A phenomenon ever since it was published, The House of God was the first unvarnished, unglorified, and uncensored portrait of what training to become a doctor is truly like, in all its terror, exhaustion and black comedy. With more than two million copies sold worldwide, it has been hailed as one of the most important medical novels ever written.

Bloodletting and Miraculous Cures by Vincent Lam
Winner of the 2006 Giller Prize, Lam has assembled a collection of short stories that follows four characters from their student days, through medical school and into their careers as doctors.

Non-fiction:

The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer by Siddhartha Mukherjee
Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, The Emperor of All Maladies illustrates how modern treatments--multi-pronged chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery, as well as preventative care--came into existence thanks to a century's worth of research, trials, and small, essential breakthroughs around the globe. While The Emperor of All Maladies is rich with the science and history behind the fight against cancer, it is also a meditation on illness, medical ethics, and the complex, intertwining lives of doctors and patients. Mukherjee's profound compassion--for cancer patients, their families, as well as the oncologists who, all too often, can offer little hope--makes this book a very human history of an elusive and complicated disease

The Night Shift: Real Life in the Heart of the E.R by Brian Goldman

In The Night Shift, Dr. Brian Goldman shares his experiences in the witching hours at Mount Sinai Hospital in downtown Toronto. We meet the kinds of patients who walk into an E.R. after midnight: late-night revellers injured on their way home after last call, teens assaulted in the streets by other teens and a woman who punches another woman out of jealousy over a man. But Goldman also reveals the emotional, heartbreaking side of everyday E.R. visits: adult children forced to make life and death decisions about critically ill parents, victims of sexual assault, and mentally ill and homeless patients looking for understanding and a quick fix in the twenty-four-hour waiting room. Written with Goldman’s trademark honesty and with surprising humour, The Night Shift is also a frank look at many issues facing the medical profession today, and it offers a highly compelling inside view into an often shrouded world.

The Secret Language of Doctors by Brian Goldman
In The Secret Language of Doctors, Dr. Brian Goldman pulls back the curtain to reveal some of medicine's darkest modern secrets, decoding the colourful and clandestine expressions doctors employ to describe difficult patients, situations and medical conditions—and sometimes even other colleagues. You'll discover what it means to exhibit the symptoms of "incarceritis," what "blocking" and "turfing" are, and why you never want to be diagnosed with a "horrendoma." In the process, you'll gain profound insight into what doctors really think about their patients' personalities and even their chances of making it out of the hospital alive.

Highly accessible, biting, funny and entertaining, The Secret Language of Doctors reveals modern medical culture at its best and all too often at its worst.



 

LMG!

Moderator
Admodistrator
1. The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, and Other Clinical Tales, by Oliver Sacks, is excellent.

2. Five Days at Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm Ravaged Hospital, by Sheri Fink. Jaw-dropping in parts, for the shocking nature of what went on after Hurricane Katrina.

3. Internal Medicine: A Doctor's Stories, by Terrence Holt. A collection of short, true stories.
 

LBoG

BMedSci/MD-JMP II UoN
The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer by Siddhartha Mukherjee
Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, The Emperor of All Maladies illustrates how modern treatments--multi-pronged chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery, as well as preventative care--came into existence thanks to a century's worth of research, trials, and small, essential breakthroughs around the globe. While The Emperor of All Maladies is rich with the science and history behind the fight against cancer, it is also a meditation on illness, medical ethics, and the complex, intertwining lives of doctors and patients. Mukherjee's profound compassion--for cancer patients, their families, as well as the oncologists who, all too often, can offer little hope--makes this book a very human history of an elusive and complicated disease
I'll wholeheartedly second this recommendation and add that The Laws of Medicine by the same author is a VERY good read.

Also Bleed by Bill Williams, which is a book written by an Australian doctor about the true story of when his wife had a bleed in her brain in the outback. Amazing book.

Also Band-Aid for a Broken Leg by Damien Brown is another non-fiction book about the authors experiences with MSF (Doctors Without Borders). Very, very good!

The Hospital by the River by Dr Catherine Hamlin is another non-fiction book about the authors life as an Australian gynaecologist who moved with her husband to work in a hospital in Ethiopia (still living and working there fifty years later).

There are many more but these came to mind first.
 
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Megs

New Member
I recently read Being Mortal on the advice of one of the doctors I work with. I really enjoyed it and had some very interesting perspectives.
 

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Crispy

New Member
Gifted Hands by Ben Carson
It's the autobiography of one of USA's best neurosurgeons and very inspiring
 

LMG!

Moderator
Admodistrator
I have lots of free time (for now....) and love reading. What are some good reads for someone who wants to study medicine?
A few recommendations in these posts.

ETA: I’ve read a few others since my previous post:
When Breath Becomes Air
House of God
(I don’t really recommend either, tbh)
and
Healing Children (a Paediatric surgeon’s autobiography). I do recommend this one, especially if you’re interested in paeds.

ETA2: I also recently read The Bone Garden, which is a novel, but it looks at the practice of grave robbing bodies to be used as cadavers in medical schools as well as post-partem fever in women who’d just given birth and where doctors were the unknowing vector in spreading infection. It was interesting because we’d just discussed that topic in a lecture.
 
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