Non-standard Applications Advice Requests

Discussion in 'Medicine Entrance' started by qwerty1234, Aug 3, 2018.

  1. qwerty1234

    qwerty1234 New Member

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    Hey! I'm a first year undergraduate student and I'm just a bit confused as to how I would go about applying for medicine this year. Do I need to make a new UAC account to apply or do I just use the same account from high school?
     
  2. Yamster

    Yamster Dental Moderator DJ May

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    Hey Qwerty,

    I believe that you do indeed have to make a new application each year. You can however transfer documents from an older application to a newer application using the form found at the bottom here: FAQs - UAC

    Hope that helps.
     
  3. LMG!

    LMG! Moderator Most Helpful Member and Staff Member of the Year 2017-2018

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    I have generalised the thread title so it can be of more use as we move out of UMAT season and towards application season.
     
  4. MSP

    MSP Banned

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    That probably depends on whether you used your UAC account earlier this year for a transfer or for an equity scholarship. Best bet is to contact UAC and ask them - they will get back to you very quickly. And then post the response here for people to see who have had the same issue.
     
  5. Eliden

    Eliden New Member

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    I just watched the UAC non standard applicant video. Looks like we have to declare all previous tertiary study. My bachelor degree GPA (started in 2002 and completed in 2009) is appalling as i was young and stupid and didn't show up to multiple exams. My completed grad dip GPA (2014) was decent though, around 6.6.

    I am really only interested in JMP. Their entry hurdle is credit GPA in a grad dip so no issue with that. Their policy states they consider the most recent uni study only. I thought this might mean that i would avoid having to show my previous study but it seems i will have to list it on the application. How likely is it that UoN will dig around my shameful academic past and will it influence them? Has anyone receivfed an offer in spite of previous uni study that was less than stellar?
     
  6. Crow

    Crow Moderator Most Active 2018

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    As you’ve pointed out, they only consider most recent study, so don’t worry about the previous study to that. For JMP GPA is simply a hurdle requirement anyway - the weighting is on UMAT s1 score to receive an interview and then solely on interview performance after that for an offer. As such, you definitely don’t need to be concerned with your old studies as you’ve met the hurdle requirement in your grad dip.
     
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  7. LMG!

    LMG! Moderator Most Helpful Member and Staff Member of the Year 2017-2018

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    Yes, can confirm. I received a JMP (and a WSU and UTAS) offer last year, despite my undergraduate GPA being mid 5s. I've since done an honours year, a doctorate, and then a grad dip, and that's all JMP (and WSU and UTAS) cared about. I declared everything on UAC and it made no difference. I also got a UNSW interview (that I didn't attend), so it didn't seem to affect UNSW either (though probably because I had a doctorate, rather than a grad dip, but I don't know that for sure). For reference, my UMAT was 198.
     
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  8. Eliden

    Eliden New Member

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    Well done. With results like that overall, they would have been crazy not to take you. My bachelor GPA was much worse than mid 5s sadly. Probably 2s or 3s. I literaly did not show up to about 8 final exams. Gave up on subjects and didn't bother to withdraw. That degree was an absolute mess. I did go back and finish it some years after i started (got around a credit average for the remainder). I knew my GPA was a write off so i didn't feel like i needed to overachieve. By that point i just wanted to finish.
     
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  9. Jamestarry91

    Jamestarry91 New Member

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    How hard do you think it will be to achieve and maintain a GPA 6.5 in a bachelor of pharmacy with honours.
    Kind regards
     
  10. Q3

    Q3 Regular Member

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    That is the wrong question to be asking. The right question is, is that degree something that you will enjoy and does it have viable career opportunities assuming that medical school does not work out? Remember that the majority of applicants are rejected and every one of us should have a back up plan should medicine not work out. Nobody should assume that it is a given that they will be accepted.
     
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  11. Jamestarry91

    Jamestarry91 New Member

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    Of course I see it as a viable career o just want to help people I was wondering if anyone thinks it would be hard to maintain the gpa, my uai was only 62.5 and I worked my are off in a science degree to get a 1st semester average of 6.5. So that I could get in to pharmacy. And trust me I don't assume o will get in as I have many hurdles to jump such as my criminal record as well but I am bot gonna let anything stop me I will fight for it . It was more just a genereal question
     
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  12. Q3

    Q3 Regular Member

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    How did you make the link between studying pharmacy and helping people? What is the connection there?
    Maintaining a high GPA is not hard so long as you like what you do and you are strong in the relevant subjects.
     
  13. Jamestarry91

    Jamestarry91 New Member

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    As pharmacists help people. Science is my strongest point in particular biology and chemistry.
     
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  14. Mana

    Mana Registrar Administrar

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    It's very difficult to gauge how 'difficult' getting a certain GPA will be because this is dependent on many factors, including how easy the courses you are doing are, how lenient the markers are and how intrinsically intelligent you are.

    Obviously people have varying levels of intelligence, and the ATAR isn't a totally accurate marker of this BUT it does at least appear to have a reasonable correlation. Going by this, if you had an ATAR in the 60's you're probably going to have to work intensely hard throughout to maintain that kind of GPA.

    Re: criminal record - as far as I know you are legally required to disclose this when you practice (and most likely when you are applying as well). The presence of this pretty much places you at the very bottom of the merit list and will cause problems for your future practice - even if you were to get a perfect 7 GPA you could still be passed over for a place - you'll find that in terms of selection, universities are usually not amenable to selecting people with criminal records for degrees with significant contact with patients (and/or restricted Schedule 8 drugs which you will need to be able to work around as a pharmacist).

    You are of course welcome to try, but you should have a very good non-healthcare backup as a career option.
     
  15. LMG!

    LMG! Moderator Most Helpful Member and Staff Member of the Year 2017-2018

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    Depending on the type and recency of criminal conviction, it may be very difficult to obtain a Working with Vulnerable People Card, which is a requirement for studying medicine.
     
  16. Q3

    Q3 Regular Member

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    I am saying this for your own good, but your answer sounds like you have done 0 research as to what the job entails. If you 'helping people' is the only reason you can give as a reason for choosing that profession then that tells me you need to do some more research.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2018
  17. Mana

    Mana Registrar Administrar

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    Pharmacy is likely to have similar restrictions, I'm sure. The poster in question doesn't seem to have mentioned medicine though.
     
  18. Yamster

    Yamster Dental Moderator DJ May

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    Hey Jamesstarry91,

    Is there a particular reason that you're aiming for a 6.5 GPA? In general terms, that's an excellent GPA but for post-grad med applications I believe that it's actually an average score (maybe even a below average score) - not my expertise, I'd have to call in Crow or Perplex to comment.

    A GPA of 6.5 isn't needed to get into pharmacy. A GPA of 4 is all that is needed, and with 17 pharmacy schools across Australia, the market seems a bit saturated at the moment (consider the fact that cohort sizes are up to 200-300 for some universities as well).

    It is true that pharmacists help people but retail pharmacy is as its names suggests, more retail than clinical. Clinical positions in hospitals are few and internships even fewer. If you look at industry reports, it shows that pharmacy has one of the highest full time-grad prospects but they're also one of the lowest paid-grads. I'd recommend that you look into the current pay situation which has averaged at about $32 an hour (and doesn't seem to be going up): Pharmacist award pay increased . Sure, money isn't the end goal but being paid the same as a late night shelf stocker or a bottle shop worker for a 4 year degree doesn't sound that flash (although, on the bright side it might still be better than the unemployment rates from BSc/BBiomedSc). Have a look at this 32 page thread on Whirlpool about pharmacy: https://forums.whirlpool.net.au/forum-replies.cfm?t=2663201 and decide if it's for you.

    I believe that criminal convictions have to be declared to AHPRA as well as per LMGs and Manas post above. If I were you, I'd look into this a bit more as most health/allied health professionals (including: chiropractors, dentists, medical practioners, nurses/midwives, optometrists, osteopaths, pharmacists, physiotherapists, podiatrists and psychologists) have to be registered with AHPRA in order to practice (legally at least).

    These thoughts are just my 2c though, you might love the profession!
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2018
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  19. Perplex

    Perplex Moderator Moderator

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    I would read thoroughly into the current job market for pharmacy before signing yourself up. I don't know the intricacies but it's something to investigate for yourself.
    As Mana has mentioned, it's difficult to discuss whether a 6.5 is "difficult" to achieve. This is dependent on a plethora of factors and anything I say is purely speculative. However, no health degree is easy, they all require substantial effort and attaining high scores is often not easy.
     
  20. LMG!

    LMG! Moderator Most Helpful Member and Staff Member of the Year 2017-2018

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    Pharmacy doesn’t require a WWVP card. I confirmed this last night with a pharmacist. I clearly didn’t read the OP’s post properly, whoops.

    ETA: to clarify, if the OP is currently enrolled in BPharm(Hons) and is hoping to maintain a 6.5GPA for postgrad Med then my advice stands :)
     

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