Non-standard Applications Advice Requests

Discussion in 'Medicine Entrance' started by qwerty1234, Aug 3, 2018.

  1. A1

    A1 Admissions Speculator Moderator

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    All these requirements are stated as of the status at end of year. Putting 6 months at time of application won't matter.
     
  2. LMG!

    LMG! Moderator Most Helpful Member and Staff Member of the Year 2017-2018

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    Unfortunately, this is only true up to the point you graduate with a completed degree, at which time it becomes GPA only. WSU will definitely use @mick’s GPA.
     
  3. Crow

    Crow Moderator Most Active 2018

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    Ah, wasn’t aware of this, that’s unfortunate! Have edited my post.
     
  4. mick

    mick New Member

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    Crow LMG!

    Thanks for all the help guys, the two of you have been absolute legends throughout this whole thread, I really appreciate the help.
     
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  5. Kamal

    Kamal New Member

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    Hi!

    Unfortunately the GPA for my Bachelors degree is utter and absolute crap. I was advised to undertake a Graduate Diploma, and medical schools will overlook the GPA of my Bachelors degree and only consider the Graduate Diploma.

    I want to know the legitimacy of this advice and what steps I can take to get into Med School.

    Thanks!
     
  6. Crow

    Crow Moderator Most Active 2018

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    Definitely do not do this with the expectation it will improve your chances for entry to medicine in Australia. The only graduate entry universities that even consider postgraduate diplomas in their GPA calculations are Notre Dame Sydney and Notre Dame Fremantle, and a one year diploma is unlikely to rescue a GPA from another degree if it is low enough. Your best bet is probably to do a new undergraduate degree (one that will provide you with an alternative career path should you never gain entry into medicine) and sit the UCAT each year during the degree (applying as a non-standard applicant to the undergraduate universities), as well as sit the GAMSAT in your second last and final years and apply for postgraduate entry (obviously aiming to keep your GPA as high as possible). Good luck :)

    ETA: I am unsure as to whether UNSW, the JMP or WSU consider graduate diplomas in their GPA calculations, though I suspect not - perhaps LMG! or A1 can weigh in.
     
  7. A1

    A1 Admissions Speculator Moderator

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    In addition to Crow's reply, it is true for UQ graduate med since they use the most recent qualification by itself. However GPA is UQ's least important criteria, once you get >5.0 it all depends on Gamsat to get an interview.

    You can also use a Grad Dip to apply to undergrad JMP but it may not be necessary. With a completed Bachelor you need "Better than pass" (around 4.3+) but Credit 5.0+ for a Grad Dip. Similarly for undergrad WSU, completed Bachelor 5.6+ but Grad Dip 6.1+.

    > [Undergrad] - (2018 Updated) Med schools Selection Criteria Y12s & Non-standards
     
  8. mdoug

    mdoug New Member

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    The way i interpreted the JMP requirments was that it was a hurdle and not a minimum, is that correct? For example I have a masters by coursework so I just need a pass in my degree and my actual GPA isnt ranked?
     
  9. LMG!

    LMG! Moderator Most Helpful Member and Staff Member of the Year 2017-2018

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    A hurdle and a minimum are similar, in that they're both the lowest GPA eligible for consideration. From there, you're right in thinking that JMP just tick a box to say you've achieved what you need to and you're not ranked on this basis like you might be in other courses (UNSW, for example).
     
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  10. mdoug

    mdoug New Member

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    Thanks LMG, do you know what WSU do in this instance after they interview? When I spoke to the uni they didn't really give me a clear answer about how much the GPA comes into play after we interview
     
  11. LMG!

    LMG! Moderator Most Helpful Member and Staff Member of the Year 2017-2018

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    From everything we've been able to gather from many years of observing data reported here at MSO, WSU work in the same was as JMP. GPA is a hurdle requirement and offers are based on interview performance. It's possible GPA could be used as a tie breaker if necessary. The main difference, really, is that GPA requirements at WSU tend to be higher than JMP (as do UMAT requirements). It's obviously not known how UCAT will affect this or how Universities will conduct this process from next year onwards, given the changes.
     
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  12. DDS

    DDS New Member

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    Hi guys, I've just finished my first year in uni and now considering switching to undergrad med in 2020. I had a look at A1's table for the non-standard pathway, are JCU, UNSW, JMP and UWS the only unis that accept non-standard applicants?

    I'm thinking of changing to commerce/laws in uq next year so I can have a better chance of getting a high GPA. Is it a bad decision to study a dual program? (if the non-standard pathway didn't work out and I end up having to go for the graduate pathway)

    I got an OP2 in year 12 and a 6.25 GPA, I'm also eligible for the rural access scheme. How well do I have to do in UCAT next year to have a chance at getting an interview from these unis?

    Thanks for your time :)
     
  13. Crow

    Crow Moderator Most Active 2018

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    + Bond if you are in the financial position to attend uni there, and Curtin is the other undergraduate uni that accepts non-standard applications but it requires a completed degree for non-standards (so you’re probably better off just pursuing graduate entry unless you are a current Curtin student, which I am guessing not).
    Definitely not a bad decision, particularly because these degrees lend themselves to solid alternative career pathways should medicine not work out. However, it may delay the time it takes for you to apply for graduate entry; you can’t do this until you have completed at least one degree (or at least the requirements of one of the degrees if you’re in a dual degree). You’d need to look at the program structure to determine whether you could complete all requirements for one degree first without it affecting the timeline for you to be eligible for graduate entry.
    Nobody can tell you how well you have to do in UCAT because we don’t have any reference point yet! Certainly being a rural applicant will give you lower entry requirements for the universities that accept non-standard applications, as well as graduate entry. However, this GPA is above the hurdle for JMP, WSU and Bond, and would be competitive for UNSW (given your OP and rural status but obviously depending on UCAT score). If you have a good written application you’d be in a shot for JCU too.
     
  14. DDS

    DDS New Member

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    Thanks Crow, that was very helpful :)
     
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  15. robbie014

    robbie014 New Member

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    Hey all,

    Sadly my UMAT and ATAR scores are not good enough for me to get into any undergrad programs, but i'm still keen to study medicine in the long run. I'm almost definitely going to study in Melbourne next year, and it seems studying Biomedicine/Biomedical Science at UniMelb or Monash is the obvious pathway into a graduate Medicine program. Seeing as the undergraduate degrees are mostly similar, I'm wondering if anyone has any information about which graduate program is easier to get into at each university, of course including things like the GAMSAT, Interviews, etc. This is probably a tough question to answer since you would only have experience in one of these universities, but any advice would help!
     
  16. LMG!

    LMG! Moderator Most Helpful Member and Staff Member of the Year 2017-2018

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    I'm not sure where you've received this information, but it's not the case. Doing a specific degree for the sake of getting into graduate medicine only (ie. not doing the degree also because it is a viable backup career on its own) is not advised at all. Statistically, most people do not get into medicine, and it is therefore very important to keep this in mind when considering your university degree choices. If your backup to Medicine would be to be a medical researcher, and you were also prepared to have to do honours and a PhD and then live research contract to research contract (which it may well be), then choosing biomedicine/biomedical science would be an okay interim pathway (but so would many, many others), but if you have no desire to work in medical research or similar, then this is not a wise choice at all.

    The Monash graduate entry program also includes Physio and Pharmacy, both of which are viable backup career degrees. You may not be interested in either of these, but it's very important to realise that your options are NOT, in any way, shape, or form, limited to biomedicine/biomedical science.

    UMelb graduate entry medicine requires a couple of pre-requisites that you can cover off from many degrees, so again, you are not locked into biomedicine/biomedical science.

    I'd recommend having a bit of a read through this thread (and similar ones) and also Common pitfalls to avoid for year 12 school leavers and other medicine applicants.

    If you have any other questions, please feel free to ask. There are a few of us here that are quite passionate about this topic and the notion that students get stuck thinking biomedicine/medical research/health science are the only viable pathways to graduate entry medicine and we are more than happy to chat through things with you further if you're not sure about anything.

    Obviously you should also discuss with other relevant people in your life (guidance counsellors, parents, etc), we just bring a slightly different perspective.
     
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  17. Crow

    Crow Moderator Most Active 2018

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    100%. robbie014 I was in your position when I first finished school, but I unfortunately wasn’t on MSO at the time, and I absolutely wish I was. I fully echo @LMG!’s sentiments above - there are so many more options out there other than biomed/health science, and you aren’t going to disadvantage yourself at all (in terms of graduate entry medicine) by pursuing another degree. Here to answer any questions you have! (FYI: I’m a Biomed graduate who will be starting graduate entry medicine in January).
     
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  18. mthk

    mthk New Member

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    Hi, I got my atar today and I was really really disappointed :(
    I got an 81 ATAR which is far off from studying dentistry or medicine
    Ares there any courses you guys recommend (at a Qld university) that is good to transfer with?
    I considered pharmacy but apparently, the content's really heavy and it's hard to achieve high marks in
    My interests are maths and science so please help me out
    Thank you!
     
  19. robbie014

    robbie014 New Member

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    Thanks both Crow and LMG! for your fantastic responses. I have heard of the idea of doing a bachelor's degree in a different field before medicine, but I guess i drifted away from it because I thought the science background from biomed would help with the GAMSAT, as well as the prospect of attaining one of the reserved places these degrees have for the graduate medicine programs (I think Monash has 50 MD places reserved for biomed students). However in saying this, I read the science knowledge needed for the GAMSAT is not exhaustive in any way, mostly covering 1st year content. Should I be worried about either of these factors? And say I was to do a non-science degree, how would I cover the GAMSAT content needed?
     
  20. LMG!

    LMG! Moderator Most Helpful Member and Staff Member of the Year 2017-2018

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    As I mentioned, Monash also have MD places reserved for BPharm and BPhysio (and BSci) students. And yes, I've not sat GAMSAT myself, but I have certainly read that there has been a significant move away from science knowledge and more towards reasoning. As far as I'm aware, UMelb do not have any reserved places beyond the Chancellor's program (someone correct me if I'm wrong).

    You don't necessarily need to move away from a science-based degree altogether. There are many that would allow you to cover the content required for UMelb's pre-requisites (a more important consideration than a degree that would cover GAMSAT content). The key question to ask yourself is, if I never get into medicine what would I like to do instead as a career? If it's not a question you've asked yourself yet, then I think that's the best place to start.

    But to get you off and running you might consider things like: pharmacy, physiotherapy, nursing, engineering, occupational therapy, speech pathology, radiography, psychology, etc. And if your answer to the question I posed above is actually, teaching, law, accountancy, social work, then those are all perfectly acceptable gateways to graduate entry medicine, too.

    ETA: if you did lean towards a non-science degree, then, in my experience, you can do one unit per semester in a 'breadth' area (including from other faculties), this would allow you to complete any pre-requisites required and is definitely worth looking into.
     

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