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NP vs MD

Latte47

Member
Hello.

I am torn between becoming an NP and an MD. I've been googling but I cannot find answers as to what the differences are and they both seem like good careers.

Could anyone provide me with some insight? If you could pick one of them, which would you pick and why?

Thank you.
 

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Crow

Staff
Moderator
A while ago you posted a thread saying you were torn between midwifery and obstetrics. I posed the question: “what do you want out of your career?”

I pose the same question to you now.
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
I am torn between becoming an NP and an MD. I've been googling but I cannot find answers as to what the differences are and they both seem like good careers.
An obvious difference is an MBBS/MD graduate can progress to vocational training to become a specialist (including GP), an NP can't.
 

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pi

Junior doctor
Emeritus Staff
An obvious difference is an MBBS/MD graduate can progress to vocational training to become a specialist (including GP), an NP can't.
Well, NPs can "specialise" too. For example, can become specialised in dialysis, or chemotherapy, or basic emergency medicine, or drug and alcohol services.
 

pi

Junior doctor
Emeritus Staff
Well obviously not because they're not doctors, but working in a specialised role nonetheless.
 

Latte47

Member
A while ago you posted a thread saying you were torn between midwifery and obstetrics. I posed the question: “what do you want out of your career?”

I pose the same question to you now.
What exactly do you mean? Do you mean things like work/life balance, patient interaction, etc.?

Well, NPs can "specialise" too. For example, can become specialised in dialysis, or chemotherapy, or basic emergency medicine, or drug and alcohol services.
Aren't there also other specialities like paediatrics, neonatal and ICU?
 

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pi

Junior doctor
Emeritus Staff
Aren't there also other specialities like paediatrics, neonatal and ICU?
Yes. I was giving some examples, not typing a comprehensive list.
 

chinaski

Regular Member
Well, NPs can "specialise" too. For example, can become specialised in dialysis, or chemotherapy, or basic emergency medicine, or drug and alcohol services.
Indeed, nurse practitioners necessarily specialise - their scope of practice is limited to what they've trained in (ie being an NP is not the equivalent of being a general practitioner or general physician).
 
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