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Otago MBChB Class of 2021

hsapien11

New Member
OUMSA was selling the American Diagnostic Corporation (ADC) Adscopes 603 and 601, with 603 being equivalent to Littmann Classic III and 601 Cardiology (someone correct me if I'm wrong though).

It seems that the relevant links are down from the OUMSA website, but here's what I could find on the web for 603: http://adctoday.com/products/603

EDIT: It was just posted on the FB group that the med equipment sale is back on till tomorrow (Tuesday) and here's the link if anyone's interested: OUMSA | Products Archive
 
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defsoul0402

New Member
Thank you. And just wondering, for second year med, what equipments do we need other than stethoscope (sphygmomanometer, tendon hammer, pupil torch?)
 

hsapien11

New Member
@defsoul0402, no worries, glad to help. I'm also starting out 2nd year med, I just got myself a steth and the case studies book. I'm waiting till I get there to see if I need the other items this year. I've heard that the OUMSA shop reopens midway through the year so maybe I'll get the rest of the stuff then.
 

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flooghost7255

BMedSci (Hons), Otago MBChB III
Hey everyone, question for the past ELM2-ers:
At what point does the stuff we do become properly examinable/stuff we really need to start learning?

From my understanding, the stuff we've had over the past week isn't overly important and won't really be examinable, so is it from the point we start psych med that everything starts becoming examinable?
 

frootloop

House Surgeon
Moderator
It's all examinable, theoretically. Obviously your intro lectures don't have any content in them, but everything else is fair game.

Also just a note, PAY ATTENTION to the first two pathology lectures you have. The acute and chronic inflammation lectures underpin so very much of what you lean over the next... forever. If you're going to write notes for any lectures this week, make it those ones.
 

blueflamingos

New Member
Yeah I agree with @frootloop on those Pathology lectures spend sometime reading and understanding acute and chronic inflammation it'll make life so much easier.

Also - just a thought, don't think of it as 'is this lecture examinable' because when it comes to studying at the end of the year you won't be sitting down to cram the slides in, you need to be learning info in an integrated way and that will be pulling what you've heard/covered in lectures together with readings, extra resources, tutorials, cases etc.
 

frootloop

House Surgeon
Moderator
As per ^, it's a totally different mindset to HSFY*, but you'll get used to it.

*By all means, try being like you were in HSFY and 'learn everything that's examinable'. I wouldn't imagine your brain will last long before turning to mush haha
 

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rustyedges

Otago MB ChB
Moderator
Don't go overboard with studying, and definitely take time off/have fun/socialise lots with your classmates/ do things you didn't get a chance to last year. But do work consistently throughout the year, and just staying up to date (a lot of people tend to start to fall behind on lectures around mid year- middle of second semester I think!) and on top of things will relieve so much pressure near the end of the year.

Textbook readings are usually not necessary, but if you do want to do them, you can access all the textbooks online via the uni library website.

The important topics to learn well are anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, and pathology. For anatomy, you'll want to learn everything that comes up in labs. I found lectures a bit of a waste of time, as they are essentially just big lists of facts thrown at you quickly, and almost all the content reappears in the labs anyway. I'd suggest at least looking over the anatomy lab content before the lab so you actually spend sometime with the prosections/models rather than just doing readings in the lab time. Also, if you do a little prep for the mini quizzes that happen before each lab that sets you up for good consistent studying throughout the year, and gives you a reasonably indication of how the OSPE will go.

I found the pharmacology quite fast paced and a bit overwhelming, especially when they teach all the cardio drugs in like a week or two. There is a drug formulary list on moodle, which has every drug you need to know for second and third year, so I'd recommend only learning the ones on there, and learning the class, mechanism of action, indications, contraindications, and side effects. This is mostly just rote learning, so you'll just have to grit your teeth and bear it :p

The other topics like blood, chem path, and infection/immunology are a bit hit and miss. There's quite a lot of content in them, but don't have a huge amount of assessment for them.

If you wanted to be really onto it, I'd suggest taking the time to go through all the old past exam papers, split them up into blocks, eg all compile all the cardiology questions (it should be obvious what sort of question it is, from your hubs knowledge :p ), and do the questions as you cover the blocks throughout the year. Not that I did this, but if I were to do ELM again, that's probably what I'd do differently haha.

Also, I'd recommend taking some time to practise the skills you learn in clinical skills, e.g. taking a pretend history from a flatmate/whoever, taking lots of blood pressures etc., especially if these don't come that naturally to you. I think failling the OSCE is a big reason why people have to sit specials. If you've done lots of mock interviews with people, you'll be a lot more confident and slick in the actual thing.
 

flooghost7255

BMedSci (Hons), Otago MBChB III
Anyone had the chem path tute yet? Wondering if it's as much of a struggle as the pre tute tasks suggest it might be haha
 

frootloop

House Surgeon
Moderator
Anyone had the chem path tute yet? Wondering if it's as much of a struggle as the pre tute tasks suggest it might be haha
Chem path is definitely as much of a struggle as the pre tute tasks suggest. Easily the most mind-bendingly confusticating couple of tutorials of ELM.
 

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flooghost7255

BMedSci (Hons), Otago MBChB III
Chem path is definitely as much of a struggle as the pre tute tasks suggest. Easily the most mind-bendingly confusticating couple of tutorials of ELM.
Had it today, it was pretty weird but actually pretty cool, like being able to pick out different diseases from the gel electrophoresis or enzyme essays after it
 

rustyedges

Otago MB ChB
Moderator
Had it today, it was pretty weird but actually pretty cool, like being able to pick out different diseases from the gel electrophoresis or enzyme essays after it
Kinda useful to know about the different liver function tests. They don't really teach it again in ELM, but it comes up occasionally other modules.
 
Chem path is a weird one, but once you "get it", its pretty good. Like rusty edges said it is good to know liver function tests (I think it is in one of the later tutorials). Make sure you do the moodle quizzes for chem path (when they are available). They have really good explanations, and I just studied off those moodle quizzes are did pretty well
 

colourred

Otago MBChB III
Can one of the older MSO members please give us some advice on Psyc Med in ELM2, I'm finding the content really interesting and I know that it is important for future practice, but I'm a bit overwhelmed in terms of what we need to get out of these lectures and how it will be assessed.
 

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frootloop

House Surgeon
Moderator
Have a look at some of the psych med questions from previous final exam papers, that should give you a reasonable idea.

You won't need too much detail on psych med, and anything that doesn't look like something you could ever see being used in clinical practice is unlikely to be examined.
 

rustyedges

Otago MB ChB
Moderator
Yeah if you take a look at past exams you'll see the behavioural med stuff is quite light. I think they tend to examine things like factors affecting health behaviour/compliance/adherence and types of learning/conditioning/memory as opposed to psychiatric stuff like depression/eating disorders/psychosis (which they do examine more in third year).

So as long as you know what some of the key terms mean, such as catastrophisation, compliance, antecedent, Pavlovian vs. Skinnerian conditioning etc. and you're able to waffle a bit about each one you should be right.
 

Mediphilic

Regular Member
Yeah if you take a look at past exams you'll see the behavioural med stuff is quite light. I think they tend to examine things like factors affecting health behaviour/compliance/adherence and types of learning/conditioning/memory as opposed to psychiatric stuff like depression/eating disorders/psychosis (which they do examine more in third year).

So as long as you know what some of the key terms mean, such as catastrophisation, compliance, antecedent, Pavlovian vs. Skinnerian conditioning etc. and you're able to waffle a bit about each one you should be right.
Haha with the exception of last year's ELM2 exams where essentially the main psych med question was a long one about Alzheimer's symptoms and symptomatic treatment o_O
 

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