Pathways to medicine options

Discussion in 'Other alternatives' started by Emie, Dec 9, 2014.

  1. Emie

    Emie New Member

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    I am a first year uni student (currently studying psychology) who would love to study medicine but my Umat this year was not high enough. Please note that I have little faith in my ability to succeed in the GAMSAT. So, I have some options but im not sure what to do:

    1. Transfer to a science degree, get credit for my psychology subjects so I can complete in two years and sit gamsat. Doesn't give me any options if I don't get a place in postgrad med.

    2. Complete PhB(Science) at ANU with potential GAMSAT free entry to medicine, conditional on maintaining a HD average AND getting first-class honours. Not sure if I can achieve this, plus I have to move interstate.

    3. Give up my medicine goal completely and pursue physioterapy, as (i think?) this is the most closely related career. No credit for my year of uni study.

    any advice would be much appreciated! Thank you
     
  2. lemondarren

    lemondarren New Member

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    Hey Emie! I thought you were doing health science at monash? did you transfer? If you got a 99 atar too (which you posted on the other thread), you should try and transfer into biomed.
     
  3. Facebook

    Facebook Regular Member

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    What aspect of medicine is physiotherapy most alike? Depending on the features you are attracted to, and assuming you chose to not pursue medicine, in light of your current sphere of training why not go on with psychology and become a clinical psychologist? Or neuropsychology?

    Medicine is a huge field so there is no single best alternative. Consider what it is that you are most attracted to (at this point), and that will guide your decisions better than guesses from an internet forum.
     
  4. Emie

    Emie New Member

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    [MENTION=20876]lemondarren[/MENTION] I transferred form health science to psych. I haven't considered Biomed as an option because I won't get credit for my subjects unlike a bachelor of science.

    [MENTION=20574]Facebook[/MENTION] I absolutely love physiology, learning about how the body systems work together and are implicated in certain diseases. I would also enjoy diagnosing problems and finding treatments. Do you think physio is the next best option to medicine considering that these are my core interests? I don't think neuropsychology has much physiology involved.
     
  5. lemondarren

    lemondarren New Member

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    Why did you transfer to psych if you're interested in the body systems? Psychs more about the mind.. I'm doing it right now haha.

    Maybe consider undergrad physiotherapy - what's your average uni marks like? If you didnt finish your 8 units of subjects your ATAR could still be used to get into most physio programs. LaTrobe atar is 97.
     
  6. Facebook

    Facebook Regular Member

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    "Psych" is about as specific a term as "Medicine". Psychology extends into clinical practice, social applications, consultation liaison, forensic environments, statistics, biology and neurology, developmental, organisational/occupational, sport, and academic, in addition to being one of the most popular undergraduate programmes for transferable skills.

    If you love physiology, body systems, and diseases, then consider medicine, nursing, psychology, physiotherapy, dentistry, physiology, anatomy, etc.

    My best advice is to sit down with the careers office at your university to talk to someone in a structured, systematic way.
     
  7. inkblot

    inkblot New Member

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    Have you considered midwifery? There seems to be good potential to work with a reasonable degree of autonomy (especially if you work in a community setting), continue learning, do research, excellent patient contact, wide variety of work settings, flexible, well-paid ...
     

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