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Practice Interview Question Thread

Gav10

stats noob but not a weaboo
I had to do an ethics essay on almost this exact topic last year!

Things to consider:

Has there been any changes in the wife’s health? Is she deteriorating? What is the context for the request?

Yes, the husband has been providing her care, but is he her formal substitute decision maker? There are criteria to be met for this to be the case.

If yes: does HE have capacity currently to be making such decisions? Is he fully informed, is he unwell, is he under undue pressure (from other family members, financial, emotional)?

In Tasmania (probably elsewhere), if he is her recognised substitute decision maker, and there are no questions as to his own capacity/functioning, then the decision is deemed to be one the doctor must abide by.

Respect for autonomy of decision making extends to that of the substitute decision maker.

Substitute decision makers have a duty to act in the patient’s “best interests”, but this is a difficult concept and varies from patient to patient.

If you, the doctor, are unsure, you can liaise with, and/or refer the case to The Guardianship Board (or your state’s equivalent).

Removal of a feeding tube wouldn’t be considered assisted suicide.
Thanks, LMG, for the comprehensive answer.
 

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Jason990090

Regular Member
Anyone want to have a go at this really uncomfortable question?
Also can any past/current bond students let me know if anything as difficult as this is likely to come up?

A young male doctor runs a solo practice in a remote area. The next closest practice is 5 hours away. One day, he sees a patient, an elderly woman's daughter outside of town. Later that same day, he runs into the daughter outside of town. They go on a date and end up having unprotected sex. The next day the woman presents to the practice requesting the morning after pill. What are they issues? What if she asked for antibiotics? What if she asked for free medicine?

- I would say the main issues are rurality. Ie from her perspective where else is she going to get the pill? Its important for her health and she is within her rights to avoid an unplanned pregnancy (has major consequences for her life). However, I as per the rules/regulations, I dont think it is appropriate for her to see this doctor because even though their relationship might be new--> it is quite personal + He is actually involved as he engaged in a sexual relationship with her.


In terms of antibiotics, the same things would apply (ie where else is she going to get a prescription if they are in a rural area) but you have to wonder whether or not the doctor would be objectively looking at things (without being biased because he obviously knows her on a personal level). Because you do not want the doctor being influenced by her. He has to make an objective call (taking into account her symptoms and current state) on whether or not to give her antibiotics.

Again free medicines are probably not appropriate as well. Because if he starts treating her preferentially and giving her free medication because of their relationship BUT others have to pay --> would not be fair. Even if she is financially not well off at all --> there could be other ways (centrelink?) to help get her medicine cheaper. Yes I could understand giving medication when it is a sample, or if it is an emergency (maybe the pharmacy has completely run out and the drug is needed urgently). But as a whole I would say no.


This answer isnt what i would say verbatim but it would be kinda similar. Ive tried to type it up very quickly so its got a shit ton of spelling and grammar errors.
 

Med2019

Member
Anyone want to have a go at this really uncomfortable question?
Also can any past/current bond students let me know if anything as difficult as this is likely to come up?

A young male doctor runs a solo practice in a remote area. The next closest practice is 5 hours away. One day, he sees a patient, an elderly woman's daughter outside of town. Later that same day, he runs into the daughter outside of town. They go on a date and end up having unprotected sex. The next day the woman presents to the practice requesting the morning after pill. What are they issues? What if she asked for antibiotics? What if she asked for free medicine?

- I would say the main issues are rurality. Ie from her perspective where else is she going to get the pill? Its important for her health and she is within her rights to avoid an unplanned pregnancy (has major consequences for her life). However, I as per the rules/regulations, I dont think it is appropriate for her to see this doctor because even though their relationship might be new--> it is quite personal + He is actually involved as he engaged in a sexual relationship with her.


In terms of antibiotics, the same things would apply (ie where else is she going to get a prescription if they are in a rural area) but you have to wonder whether or not the doctor would be objectively looking at things (without being biased because he obviously knows her on a personal level). Because you do not want the doctor being influenced by her. He has to make an objective call (taking into account her symptoms and current state) on whether or not to give her antibiotics.

Again free medicines are probably not appropriate as well. Because if he starts treating her preferentially and giving her free medication because of their relationship BUT others have to pay --> would not be fair. Even if she is financially not well off at all --> there could be other ways (centrelink?) to help get her medicine cheaper. Yes I could understand giving medication when it is a sample, or if it is an emergency (maybe the pharmacy has completely run out and the drug is needed urgently). But as a whole I would say no.


This answer isnt what i would say verbatim but it would be kinda similar. Ive tried to type it up very quickly so its got a shit ton of spelling and grammar errors.
I completely agree with your idea of rurality being a major issue but I would also talk about the unprotected sex aspect of it being an issue, Considering that an important characteristic of being a doctor is to be responsible, since you do make so many crucial decisions regarding the welfare of patients, The risks of unprotected sex are quite prevalent often leading to STD's and it is widely known as something that is a irresponsible behaviour.

Due to him having this unprotected sex with an individual who has now presented as his patient, he could also be dismissive about her request for antibiotics as he may say that he is very sure he does not have an STI.

But yeah i agree with your answer, just wanted to add in something that I thought :)
 

Med2019

Member
Anyone want to have a go at this really uncomfortable question?
Also can any past/current bond students let me know if anything as difficult as this is likely to come up?

A young male doctor runs a solo practice in a remote area. The next closest practice is 5 hours away. One day, he sees a patient, an elderly woman's daughter outside of town. Later that same day, he runs into the daughter outside of town. They go on a date and end up having unprotected sex. The next day the woman presents to the practice requesting the morning after pill. What are they issues? What if she asked for antibiotics? What if she asked for free medicine?

- I would say the main issues are rurality. Ie from her perspective where else is she going to get the pill? Its important for her health and she is within her rights to avoid an unplanned pregnancy (has major consequences for her life). However, I as per the rules/regulations, I dont think it is appropriate for her to see this doctor because even though their relationship might be new--> it is quite personal + He is actually involved as he engaged in a sexual relationship with her.


In terms of antibiotics, the same things would apply (ie where else is she going to get a prescription if they are in a rural area) but you have to wonder whether or not the doctor would be objectively looking at things (without being biased because he obviously knows her on a personal level). Because you do not want the doctor being influenced by her. He has to make an objective call (taking into account her symptoms and current state) on whether or not to give her antibiotics.

Again free medicines are probably not appropriate as well. Because if he starts treating her preferentially and giving her free medication because of their relationship BUT others have to pay --> would not be fair. Even if she is financially not well off at all --> there could be other ways (centrelink?) to help get her medicine cheaper. Yes I could understand giving medication when it is a sample, or if it is an emergency (maybe the pharmacy has completely run out and the drug is needed urgently). But as a whole I would say no.


This answer isnt what i would say verbatim but it would be kinda similar. Ive tried to type it up very quickly so its got a shit ton of spelling and grammar errors.
and I guess expanding on asking for free medicines, her presenting as a patient is outside of whatever their personal relations might be, taking into account that a doctor must fairly distribute resources and must partake in justice, it would be wrong of him to agree to give out free medicines.
 

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Jason990090

Regular Member
I completely agree with your idea of rurality being a major issue but I would also talk about the unprotected sex aspect of it being an issue, Considering that an important characteristic of being a doctor is to be responsible, since you do make so many crucial decisions regarding the welfare of patients, The risks of unprotected sex are quite prevalent often leading to STD's and it is widely known as something that is a irresponsible behaviour.

Due to him having this unprotected sex with an individual who has now presented as his patient, he could also be dismissive about her request for antibiotics as he may say that he is very sure he does not have an STI.

But yeah i agree with your answer, just wanted to add in something that I thought :)
I think you make a good point, but I didn't talk too much about that unprotected sex bit because at the end of the day, they both would have known the potential ramifications of having unprotected sex. I think that decision is on them.

Do you kinda get where im coming from with this? Like i was basically unsure on whether or not its my place to be commenting on their choices on the previous day.
 

MimmaE

Member
I think you make a good point, but I didn't talk too much about that unprotected sex bit because at the end of the day, they both would have known the potential ramifications of having unprotected sex. I think that decision is on them.

Do you kinda get where im coming from with this? Like i was basically unsure on whether or not its my place to be commenting on their choices on the previous day.
I really think this is way too advanced and medical for an undergrad interview ? Hope so!
 

Jason990090

Regular Member
Hey there chaps. Heres another good question for y'all.

A 3rd year medical student posts negative remarks about a consultant on a private facebook group. Is this okay?
Does it matter if the group was private?
What should the student have done?

In my exact 7 min timed answer, I looked at this from a few different perspectives.

  • STUDENT – CONSULTANT – MEDICAL SCHOOL – Public
  • STUDENT = MAYBE THEY FEEL LIKE THE CONSULTANT HAS DONE SOMETHING WRONG WITH THEM OR THEIR FELLOW STUDENTS or maybe they arent really learning anything under guidance. It could be a whole host of things so its important to find out why. Or maybe they have are just making a toxic personal remark about the consultant. We need to find out why exactly from their viewpoint
  • consultant = is going to feel terrible if they find out. If the student is remarking something which is negative but not toxic (maybe related to their teaching style) then maybe they would like to hear these concerns in private not just through social media. And its not hard to find out these days because information even privately spreads like wildfire on social media these days.
  • The hospital's reputation might take a hit if this spreads. This impacts the public's trust in the hospital. Talked about how important trust is in our healthcare system.
  • The best way to deal with this situation is to talk to a hospital director maybe? or the placement co-coordinator at the university if the student has some concerns regarding the teaching or behaviour of the consultant. Because Like I said before we dont know what these negative remarks are about specifically. So the exact course of action would depend on that.
  • But if the student is making personal toxic remarks about the consultant then that is not the right thing to do and I would explain this to them in a calm manner. I would encourage them to think of this situation from the consultant's perspective and how they would feel if they heard these things.
  • Finally, I think there is a difference in venting about something or someone in a private group amongst 2 or 3 people vs a whole group of people. I still do not think it is okay in a private group because its very easy for things to spread in social media.
But someone pls critique me. Thanks
 

Axwe8

Bond MD III
Guys try and keep the scenarios to a really basic level if you want to simulate bond. In 2 years the hardest scenario is about using drugs and explaining why it's bad/ what do you do. Rest are like group member not doing their work etc. Very simple university students type questions. Don't over complicate unless you're just preparing for what if situations could come rare situations.

No rural no politics, definitely no medical course content like the pill etc. You learn that when you enter end of 2nd year in repro block. Study why you want bond really badly, why you want medicine. Common things under these domains
  • Knowledge and critical thinking
  • Leadership
  • Initiative and teamwork
  • Communication skills
  • Responsibility
  • Ethical decision-making skills (reporting academic misconduct at uni)
  • Motivation
  • Non-verbal reasoning
 
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Axwe8

Bond MD III
Hey there chaps. Heres another good question for y'all.

A 3rd year medical student posts negative remarks about a consultant on a private facebook group. Is this okay?
Does it matter if the group was private?
What should the student have done?

In my exact 7 min timed answer, I looked at this from a few different perspectives.

  • STUDENT – CONSULTANT – MEDICAL SCHOOL – Public
  • STUDENT = MAYBE THEY FEEL LIKE THE CONSULTANT HAS DONE SOMETHING WRONG WITH THEM OR THEIR FELLOW STUDENTS or maybe they arent really learning anything under guidance. It could be a whole host of things so its important to find out why. Or maybe they have are just making a toxic personal remark about the consultant. We need to find out why exactly from their viewpoint
  • consultant = is going to feel terrible if they find out. If the student is remarking something which is negative but not toxic (maybe related to their teaching style) then maybe they would like to hear these concerns in private not just through social media. And its not hard to find out these days because information even privately spreads like wildfire on social media these days.
  • The hospital's reputation might take a hit if this spreads. This impacts the public's trust in the hospital. Talked about how important trust is in our healthcare system.
  • The best way to deal with this situation is to talk to a hospital director maybe? or the placement co-coordinator at the university if the student has some concerns regarding the teaching or behaviour of the consultant. Because Like I said before we dont know what these negative remarks are about specifically. So the exact course of action would depend on that.
  • But if the student is making personal toxic remarks about the consultant then that is not the right thing to do and I would explain this to them in a calm manner. I would encourage them to think of this situation from the consultant's perspective and how they would feel if they heard these things.
  • Finally, I think there is a difference in venting about something or someone in a private group amongst 2 or 3 people vs a whole group of people. I still do not think it is okay in a private group because its very easy for things to spread in social media.
But someone pls critique me. Thanks
Good question, so there is uni policy about not posting anything about anyone that identifies them on social media or even more simple just don't post anything at all. Simply say you don't condone any of this behaviour. You're right just talk to placement coordinator who organises your placement. Dw about hospital image etc just think from student point of view...

Plug in some support services available also if you have time.
 

Jason990090

Regular Member
Good question, so there is uni policy about not posting anything about anyone that identifies them on social media or even more simple just don't post anything at all. Simply say you don't condone any of this behaviour. You're right just talk to placement coordinator who organises your placement. Dw about hospital image etc just think from student point of view...

Plug in some support services available also if you have time.
Thanks for the advice mate!
 

Reem

Lurker
Hi
can someone help with this scenario please

You are treasurer of a university Club controlling club money and you are one of 3 members of the Executive. There is going to be a Meeting in another city with similar clubs from other universities. The club has enough money to cover the costs of only 3 members. There are 8 club members and everybody wants to go and for the club to pay their expenses. What do you do?
 

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