Quick Questions 2021/2022

Mod Edit

As a new application cycle comes around, its now time for a new Quick Questions thread. This discussion will do nicely as the first post :D

This thread is for quick, non-university specific, topics that do NOT already have an existing thread, relating to the application cycle in 2021 for 2022 entry.

Before you post your questions, we ask you familiarise yourself with a bit of the content that already exists plentifully on this website, or attempt to post in the appropriate threads to ask such questions (pro tip: asking in the appropriate threads will attract the attention of the right users to answer your questions).

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~~~~~~ Original Post ~~~~~~

I've seen somewhere that medical school at most unis (other than Macquarie, Bond ect) is around 10k per year. Can anybody confirm this. A 50-60 thousand dollar debt doesn't sound too bad in comparison to a 400k debt
 
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ucatboy

MD II
Valued Member
I've seen somewhere that medical school at most unis (other than Macquarie, Bond ect) is around 10k per year. Can anybody confirm this. A 50-60 thousand dollar debt doesn't sound too bad in comparison to a 400k debt
Yeah, almost all undergrad courses (medicine included) are paid for in part by the government, you can put it on your HECS too to pay later.
 

LMG!

MBBS IV
Administrator
I've seen somewhere that medical school at most unis (other than Macquarie, Bond ect) is around 10k per year. Can anybody confirm this. A 50-60 thousand dollar debt doesn't sound too bad in comparison to a 400k debt

Yes, it’s around $12k (student contribution) per year. The government pick up the rest of the tab for CSPs and BMPs.
 
Ive seen on the UNSW website that the cost per unit is $1000. wouldn't that make uni around 50k a year???? How much of this does the government cover.
 

dotwingz

Google Enthusiast
Moderator
Yes it probably costs that much for the university, however all domestic places at UNSW are supported by the commonwealth government (hence Commonwealth Supported Place) of which they pay the large majority of your tuition no questions asked. The rest you cover with HECS.


You can see here that the maximum student contribution amount (SCA) a university can charge $11,300, and the government covers the rest with $27, 000 (btw this $11,300 is also listed on the UNSW Future Students Page)

The UNSW website that says 1000 /unit is for *fee* paying students, or students without a CSP, aka International students.
 

uganda4u

Lurker
Just wondering how many times can we apply to study medicine with the same bachelor's degree if our first attempt of applications was unsuccessful?
 

dotwingz

Google Enthusiast
Moderator
For undergraduate? As many times as you want. Graduate schools often have a 10 year limit on the degree, so you will be able to reapply for 10 years after your graduate if you so wish.
 

axs_13

Member
Hi, I’m currently undertaking Oral Health and would like to transfer into medicine or dentistry next year? I’m a new mum so studying has been difficult seeing as I’m at campus 3/5 days of the week. What GPA would I need in Oral Health in order to transfer?
 

dotwingz

Google Enthusiast
Moderator
Are you studying full time?

If so you will need a ~4.7 for JMP and a 6.2 for WSU to reach the hurdle where GPA is no longer considered. For UNSW and JCU the higher the better, but the former requiring a high 6 and the latter requiring somewhere in the mid 6’s plus a strong application

If you’re from Greater West Sydney your GPA is lower for WSU, and if your studying less than full time your ATAR might be used at JMP and JCU

Also just want to clarify that full time means the amount of courses you need to graduate in the advertised time, generally 4 normal sized courses a sem.
 

axs_13

Member
Yes I’m studying full time and I just got off my Gap Year (2020) after graduating in 2019 with an 89.10 ATAR and UCAT score of 2240 :(

What do you mean by a “~4.7” is that greater than 4.7 (4.8+) or would 4.7 be considered okay?
 

dotwingz

Google Enthusiast
Moderator
It’s not advertised exactly what score but UAC documents indicate 4.7 is the required amount at the very least.
 

axs_13

Member
Thank you for the clarification! I have looked at the Med Entry Data and have noticed that some transfer students have gained a UCAT score in the 86th percentiles, should that be something I consider to achieve? As AR and VR are definitely my weak points in UCAT
 

dotwingz

Google Enthusiast
Moderator
I assume this is for Adelaide? There’s only like a handful of spots on offer so the score can fluctuate very easily between years.

I would aim for 95+ percentile so you would be competitive for not only adelaide but also other non standard uni’s if you are able to move out there
 

axs_13

Member
I was looking at JCU but if Adelaide is better to get into then I’m happy to transfer across states. Apart from Hazells UCAT guide is there any other resources to help improve my score?
 

Caffeine

Regular Member
Thank you for the clarification! I have looked at the Med Entry Data and have noticed that some transfer students have gained a UCAT score in the 86th percentiles, should that be something I consider to achieve? As AR and VR are definitely my weak points in UCAT
Just as a note WSU use a different formula than just directly taking your UCAT score which places a heavy emphasis on VR scores. If this is a university you are considering you need a strong VR score as well in addition to meeting the percentile cut-off.
 

axs_13

Member
What range in score for VR would be competitive enough? Also is the formula similar to percentiles and rank or completely different?
 
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