Studying Medicine Overseas

Discussion in 'Overseas Practice' started by GMC, Jul 25, 2018.

  1. GMC

    GMC New Member

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    Hello,

    I am a year 10 student (yes, I know, still pretty young to be thinking about this) and I really want to study medicine. However, I am sure that I don't want to do it here. I have been thinking about studying in Europe (UK, France, Scandinavia + others) but want to know about possible problems associated with this. I am aware that having obtained a degree from another country, it can be difficult to return to Australia, but what about working in that country? Language is not necessarily a problem as I am fluent in French and can get around in Norwegian. And I am also quite indecisive, so I fear beginning a course only to find I don't like it.

    Any and all help is greatly appreciated xx
     
  2. Mana

    Mana Resident Medical Officer (UNDS MBBS) Administrar

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    In my signature is a link titled "Common Pitfalls to avoid" - give that a read and then ask any further questions after you've read it.
     
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  3. chinaski

    chinaski Regular Member

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    Much of the answer to your question will hinge on whether you are entitled to citizenship in any of the European countries that interest you. As a member of the EU, your right to reside and work in aligned countries is secure, and miles easier than if you come as a foreigner. Bear in mind, Brexit will soon mean that the UK is stand alone, as are other countries that do not belong to the EU (which includes Norway).
     
  4. GMC

    GMC New Member

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    Thank you for your help! So, you'd definitely advise against it? What about studying interstate? I live in Melbourne, would studying in any other state increase/decrease my chances?
     
  5. chinaski

    chinaski Regular Member

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    Increase or decrease your chances of what, exactly? Working overseas? Working in Australia? You're all over the place here.
     
  6. GMC

    GMC New Member

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    Increase/decrease chances of getting in to a uni, then getting an internship.
     
  7. Mana

    Mana Resident Medical Officer (UNDS MBBS) Administrar

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    If you are an Australian citizen and you gain entry into an Australian medical school in a CSP/BMP spot, provided things don't drastically change, you'll be guaranteed an internship somewhere in Australia (no guarantees that it will be where you want it to be, of course).

    If you apply interstate and in-state, you obviously increase your chances of getting in over only applying in-state. As a general rule, the first internship (and potentially the only internship) you'll be offered will be in the state in which you complete your medical school training (so, for example, if you went to UNSW, you'd be guaranteed an internship somewhere in NSW).
     
  8. chinaski

    chinaski Regular Member

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    As per Mana, assuming you have competitive scores, the more universities you apply to in Australia, the greater your chances of getting into a course, and obtaining a job thereafter. But, you stated in your original post that "...I really want to study medicine. However, I am sure that I don't want to do it here" - which suggests to me that you probably first need to think about your motivations for wanting to study in a particular place, in the context of what you want in the long term. Studying and working overseas (as per the subject of your first post) is an entirely reasonable option if you WANT immigrate and establish yourself there. However, if you want to work in Australia, you're silly to consider studying elsewhere (which you already seem to understand, going by your first post).
     

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