Textbook Recommendations, Questions, and Discussion

LMG!

MBBS IV
Administrator
Any good textbooks for psychiatry?

Download of Psychiatry by Saxby Pridmore is a regularly updated e-book that I'd highly recommend if your uni has access to it and you have an appetite for Psychiatry (it's very thorough).

ETA: Actually, it looks like it could be open access: Download of Psychiatry (with Chapters 3 and 20 translated into French by Désirée Fritsch, Chapter 3 translated into Italian by Ilaria Montagni, and the complete text translated into Bulgarian by Assoc. Prof. Petar Marinov) - Open Access Repository
 

Benjamin

ICU Reg (JCU)
Emeritus Staff
Toronto notes psych chapter was all I used during my rotation it has all the DSM criteria and drugs etc and is very concise

Agree with this, med school psych rotation should probably be limited in terms of theoretical knowledge to the DSM criteria & drugs with indications / side effects / monitoring. Stuff you should learn on the actual rotation essentially comes down to how to take a psych history / suicide risk assessment / how to do an MSE (i.e. what the DSM criteria actually look like) / de-escalation strategies / laws around capacity & mental health act. Additional stuff you should know about mostly includes the risk profiles of psych patients.

If you get that much out of your rotation then you are doing well.
 
Hello,

Under the assumption of applying for SET in the not to distant future, I'm considering shifting my primary reading resources away from my university prescribed texts and towards the GSSE recommended texts (Found here). The hope being when it's time to sit the GSSE I'll already be familiar with the material.

To that end, I'm wondering how others have found these texts, do they work in situ of the standard litany of Anatomy/Physiology/BioChem/Pharma etc or would I just be making life more difficult for myself trying to kill two birds with one stone?

Thanks.
 

LMG!

MBBS IV
Administrator
Hello,

Under the assumption of applying for SET in the not to distant future, I'm considering shifting my primary reading resources away from my university prescribed texts and towards the GSSE recommended texts (Found here). The hope being when it's time to sit the GSSE I'll already be familiar with the material.

To that end, I'm wondering how others have found these texts, do they work in situ of the standard litany of Anatomy/Physiology/BioChem/Pharma etc or would I just be making life more difficult for myself trying to kill two birds with one stone?

Thanks.

As far as I know, we don’t have any regular members who are surgeons or heading down that track at present, but Mana Benjamin or rustyedges may be able to provide some insight?
 

Mana

there are no stupid questions, only people
Administrator
You mean your medical school textbooks aren't already Last's Anatomy and Robbins Pathology? D:

I think those are not the easiest textbooks to read (for me Lasts is easier to read than Robbins) but they should do perfectly fine for your medical school exams provided you personally can learn from them. I definitely used some of Last's in the later years of medical school.

I think whether you use those textbooks should be dependent on your ability to learn from them. I have found that the more anatomy I have learned the easier it is to read an anatomy book and so I am comfortable studying from Last's Anatomy. I don't think I would have been able to learn as much from it during my earlier medical school years. As you are the one who knows how much you retain from these textbooks, the onus is on you to see if you are able to retain information from it.

That said, if your concerns are whether they will cover their subjects in appropriate enough depth for medical school, the answer is yes, it will, and then some.
 
That said, if your concerns are whether they will cover their subjects in appropriate enough depth for medical school, the answer is yes, it will, and then some.

Great, that was my primary concern, that they were perhaps too specialised to the surgical sciences to be useful in medical school.

Personally I've always found difficult textbooks are just a matter of perseverance, that is partly why I'm making the change early. If I managed to stumble through Jacksons Electrodynamics in undergrad I'm not going to let Last's defeat me!
 
I'm considering investing in a physical clinical medicine textbook as I head into clinical years next year. During pre-clinical study I liked using Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine occasionally due to its inclusion of pathophysiology in its explanation for many disease processes which I much prefer over Oxford's Handbook in Clinical Medicine.
I'm not asking whether it is efficient to use textbooks (I think I can do it efficiently when I make flashcards out of them), nor whether it is wise to use a detailed textbook at the medical student level (I would like to decide that myself). Instead I'm worried about the fact that Harrison's is an American text, and was wondering if any of the subtle differences between how medicine is practiced here versus in the USA might be significant enough if I use Harrison's as my 'Bible', so to speak.

I looked back at this thread and saw recommendation to use Kumar and Clark which I may look into, but I'm wondering whether the fact that Harrison's is American, is significant at all. Thanks.
 

Benjamin

ICU Reg (JCU)
Emeritus Staff
[...]I'm considering shifting my primary reading resources away from my university prescribed texts and towards the GSSE recommended texts (Found here). [...] To that end, I'm wondering how others have found these texts, do they work in situ of the standard litany of Anatomy/Physiology/BioChem/Pharma etc or would I just be making life more difficult for myself trying to kill two birds with one stone.

Mana has already said most of the relevant stuff - primarily that you need to pass medical school first and so you should focus on resources that let you do that. There is a pretty reasonable chance that the exam questions in medical school are going to be semi-tailored to the resources you are prescribed, i.e. if you read a different textbook you might end up focusing on the wrong stuff. In general, if you are someone who barely passes then I would recommend sticking with the resources that you learn best from right now (rather than perservering / struggling) but if that's not a concern for you then changing over early is a good idea.

The anatomy in Last's will be in far too much depth for medical school, but it's also in far too much depth to learn it in one go -- instead try and cover it to medical school depth now (rather than GSSE depth) so that when you come back to look at it for the GSSE you are only adding a bit rather than learning it all from scratch.

In terms of GSSE study there is also a set of ANKI flashcards that are floating around (I don't have a copy) which are built off Last's Anatomy & have -- anecdotally -- a 100% pass rate for being the only source of study used by 4 of my friends, i.e. they never even picked up Last's before the exam. If you hassle the surgical registrars at your hospital you'll probably be able to snag a copy.

I'm considering investing in a physical clinical medicine textbook as I head into clinical years next year. [...] Instead I'm worried about the fact that Harrison's is an American text, and was wondering if any of the subtle differences between how medicine is practiced here versus in the USA might be significant enough if I use Harrison's as my 'Bible', so to speak.

A physical copy of Harrison's is $256 on Amazon. It is so big it could be used as a weapon.
A year subscription to UpToDate is ~$280 for a student and the subscription can be split between 2 people, i.e. you can both use the same login.

My 1000% recommendation would be to get UpToDate and use it as your 'bible' as clinical student and as a junior doctor. When you get into registrar years / deeper into topics it starts to lose of a bit of it's value since you really need to be reading the primary studies yourself ... but it's honestly invaluable for work. I use my subscription multiple times every single day -- can't remember the autoimmune screen for hepatitis / can't remember all the possible causes of thrombocytopenia / not sure what a giant platelet means on a blood film report / want to know what history questions or examination findings to assess in chest pain / need to look up some drug information / need to get an overview of a topic and want quick access to the major systematic reviews? All of it is available on your phone in your pocket with UpToDate.

Yes, there is some regional variation but my experience has been that provided you don't follow the medication dosing regimes & cross-check it with an Australian resource if you are going to then it's pretty great. I still use it now when working as a med reg seeing patients in ED / on the wards -- quick search of their presenting complaint and scroll through even the contents page of a topic helps me make sure I don't miss anything.

Additionally, having information so readily accessible with the ability to see the references (if you use Sci-Hub) quickly makes it way better than a physical textbook and lets you find out whether the recommendation they are making is specific to another country or can be applied to your situation.
 

LMG!

MBBS IV
Administrator
A physical copy of Harrison's is $256 on Amazon. It is so big it could be used as a weapon.
A year subscription to UpToDate is ~$280 for a student and the subscription can be split between 2 people, i.e. you can both use the same login.

Don't know about other unis, but as long as I open via my uni's library I can (and regularly do!) access UTD for free.
 
A physical copy of Harrison's is $256 on Amazon. It is so big it could be used as a weapon.
A year subscription to UpToDate is ~$280 for a student and the subscription can be split between 2 people, i.e. you can both use the same login.

My 1000% recommendation would be to get UpToDate and use it as your 'bible' as clinical student and as a junior doctor. When you get into registrar years / deeper into topics it starts to lose of a bit of it's value since you really need to be reading the primary studies yourself ... but it's honestly invaluable for work. I use my subscription multiple times every single day -- can't remember the autoimmune screen for hepatitis / can't remember all the possible causes of thrombocytopenia / not sure what a giant platelet means on a blood film report / want to know what history questions or examination findings to assess in chest pain / need to look up some drug information / need to get an overview of a topic and want quick access to the major systematic reviews? All of it is available on your phone in your pocket with UpToDate.

Yes, there is some regional variation but my experience has been that provided you don't follow the medication dosing regimes & cross-check it with an Australian resource if you are going to then it's pretty great. I still use it now when working as a med reg seeing patients in ED / on the wards -- quick search of their presenting complaint and scroll through even the contents page of a topic helps me make sure I don't miss anything.

Additionally, having information so readily accessible with the ability to see the references (if you use Sci-Hub) quickly makes it way better than a physical textbook and lets you find out whether the recommendation they are making is specific to another country or can be applied to your situation.

I'm fine with paying for UTD when I'm a junior doctor seeing as I'll have access to UTD through my university for now. I don't have problems passing exams, I want learn as much as I can and be as thorough as I can so that I can be the best doctor I can be. Thanks for your input regarding the regional variation, since you don't find it much of a problem, I think that will lean me towards investing in a copy of Harrison's, assuming that the regional variation in UTD would be similar to that found in Harrison's.
 

chinaski

Regular Member
Difference being, UTD is, well, up to date. Harrisons is a great text book, but it's fixed in one point in time and is becoming superseded even as it goes to press.
 

rustyedges

Moderator
Moderator
The other issue with using Harrison's as your 'bible' is that it isn't going to cover significant chunks of what you need to know for things like for paeds, psych, O+G.
 

chinaski

Regular Member
The other issue with using Harrison's as your 'bible' is that it isn't going to cover significant chunks of what you need to know for things like for paeds, psych, O+G.

To be fair, I don't think the OP was of the opinion that Harry's is anything but a bible of adult internal medicine (as is its reputation). No resource or text really attempts or claims to cover every medical and surgical discipline in one place!
 

eponine

Member
Would someone be able to give a pros and cons for moore and dalley's/gray's anatomy please? i'm a first year med student going into second sem, and i've perused both but don't really know how to tell them apart...struggling to decide which to buy - thanks!
 

LMG!

MBBS IV
Administrator
Would someone be able to give a pros and cons for moore and dalley's/gray's anatomy please? i'm a first year med student going into second sem, and i've perused both but don't really know how to tell them apart...struggling to decide which to buy - thanks!
I know you've said you've perused both, but just checking... are they in your uni library? Can you actually use either one/both for a while first, rather than just a quick look? That might be useful? Otherwise, I can't as I've got an old Moore that I was luckily given by a friend/ex-student, so have never used Gray's in order to compare.
 
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