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UMAT Study Tips

Tom Reiner

New Member
QUESTION: Does anyone know some good reading comprehension or Victor Serbiakoff puzzle books to help with UMAT prep?
Cheers
 

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Jessica Roath

New Member
Sorry, don't remember all section scores, but my section 1 jumped up by 20 (1st time around it was under 50). And yes I'm at monash now.
Sorry just abit curious, how did you get into monash when you've done umat twice? I thought they only take into account the umat that you did in year 12?
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator

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alpaca

New Member
Hello, just wondering if anyone has any tips for S3? (finding the middle pattern in particular).
I read a few tips on MSO and many said that S3 was the easiest to improve on, but have found finding the middle pattern to be difficult.
Any relevant advice would be much appreciated.
 

Michael Balfour

New Member
If there is a more appropriate thread for discussing UMAT test taking strategies and UMAT study strategies please direct me to it, I have had a look though the UMAT blogs on MSO for one. It sounds like people have to do the UMAT two or more times over two or more years, before they get a UMAT score that's good enough for an interview. How often is that the case? Since we only get three hours to do the UMAT test, I suppose that a good strategy for doing the test would be to get as many questions in the S2 construct done in the first hour, get as many questions in the S1 construct done in the second hour, and get as many questions in the S3 construct done in the third and last hour. The s2 construct (Understanding People) appears to be the easiest so maybe it would be best to do the S2 construct in the first hour. I have timed myself in doing the S2 construct in the practice materials and I can get it done in about 40-50 minutes (I will try to improve on this further). That would leave 2 hours and 10-20 minutes for the rest of the test. I suppose that it follows that one should study S1 and S3 more than S2?
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
If there is a more appropriate thread for discussing UMAT test taking strategies and UMAT study strategies please direct me to it
Have you read this one > Pre-UMAT 2018 Discussion Thread

It sounds like people have to do the UMAT two or more times over two or more years, before they get a UMAT score that's good enough for an interview. How often is that the case?
I'd say 80+% of undergrad places go to school leavers who have only done UMAT once (unless they trialed while in Y11 against the rules).
 

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Mana

Registrar
Admodistrator
I'd say 80+% of undergrad places go to school leavers who have only done UMAT once (unless they trialed while in Y11 against the rules).
If true this is very consistent with the idea that people who do poorly in it once are likely to do poorly in it on repeat attempts.
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
If true ...
I figure 80+% school leavers is a good estimate since out of ~1500 undergrad/provisional places I calculate that less than 300 go to non-standards. So the rest must go to school leavers (I hope that logic is correct haha).

Going by UNSW's published stats about 1/3rd of its intake are non-standard. Assuming this same ratio for WSU & JMP gives 160 for these three schools. Plus small numbers by JCU, UTas, Adel, Curtin... won't come up to 300.

this is very consistent with the idea that people who do poorly in it once are likely to do poorly in it on repeat attempts.
Not fully agreeing with this though. If we remove the factor of the schools not welcoming non-standard applicants i.e. using UNSW alone as a typical example, a third of the intake are those who likely have done UMAT more than once and improved.
 

Michael Balfour

New Member
I figure 80+% school leavers is a good estimate since out of ~1500 undergrad/provisional places I calculate that less than 300 go to non-standards. So the rest must go to school leavers (I hope that logic is correct haha).

Going by UNSW's published stats about 1/3rd of its intake are non-standard. Assuming this same ratio for WSU & JMP gives 160 for these three schools. Plus small numbers by JCU, UTas, Adel, Curtin... won't come up to 300.



Not fully agreeing with this though. If we remove the factor of the schools not welcoming non-standard applicants i.e. using UNSW alone as a typical example, a third of the intake are those who likely have done UMAT more than once and improved.
So would you be surprized if someone who has a previous completed degree(s) gets interviews at JMP and WSU, and then gets admitted to JMP or WSU, all from the first and only attempt at the UMAT?
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
So would you be surprized if someone who has a previous completed degree(s) gets interviews at JMP and WSU, and then gets admitted to JMP or WSU, all from the first and only attempt at the UMAT?
No I wouldn't be surprised, since it's all possible (and proven) for first attempt or repeated attempt to succeed, or fail.
 

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woodsy

WSU MBBS II
I figure 80+% school leavers is a good estimate since out of ~1500 undergrad/provisional places I calculate that less than 300 go to non-standards. So the rest must go to school leavers (I hope that logic is correct haha).

Going by UNSW's published stats about 1/3rd of its intake are non-standard. Assuming this same ratio for WSU & JMP gives 160 for these three schools. Plus small numbers by JCU, UTas, Adel, Curtin... won't come up to 300.



Not fully agreeing with this though. If we remove the factor of the schools not welcoming non-standard applicants i.e. using UNSW alone as a typical example, a third of the intake are those who likely have done UMAT more than once and improved.
At WSU we actually have 60% of our cohort as non-standards this year, but honestly feels like more. So around 80-85 from us out of 145.
 

LMG!

Moderator
Admodistrator
At WSU we actually have 60% of our cohort as non-standards this year, but honestly feels like more. So around 80-85 from us out of 145.
I have heard that UNE is similar, and there are also substantially more non-standards (including BMedRes students) at UTAS this year than in previous years apparently.
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
At WSU we actually have 60% of our cohort as non-standards this year
I have heard that UNE is similar
The interview weighs 100% (or close to) for place offers at these schools. Can we speculate that results in skewing toward the more matured applicants?
 

LMG!

Moderator
Admodistrator
The interview weighs 100% (or close to) for place offers at these schools. Can we speculate that results in skewing toward the more matured applicants?
That’s exactly what I’d speculate, yep. I think LBoG has reported significant numbers of non standards at UoN, too. Even if only 1 or 2 years of uni (and more than 1 UMAT attempt).
 

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Lear

Monash BMedSci/MD I
Gold star winner
Hello all,
Firstly if this has been addressed in depth somewhere please link me to it as I might have missed it.

I’m having trouble figuring out how to effectively review questions I have gotten in correct in order to improve. It is mentioned constantly that reviewing exams is much more vital than simply spamming them. I find myself simply looking at questions and saying to myself ‘oh that was it? Why didn’t I think of that’ for many of the questions I get wrong. Furthermore, for section 3, I just don’t quite get how one can improve by reviewing questions they got wrong as section 3 questions are often very variable. Even section 1 the questions are often very unique.
In essence, how do I look at my mistakes and ensure I make less of these in future attempts, despite the variability of all 3 sections.

Thank you
 

LMG!

Moderator
Admodistrator
Hello all,
Firstly if this has been addressed in depth somewhere please link me to it as I might have missed it.

I’m having trouble figuring out how to effectively review questions I have gotten in correct in order to improve. It is mentioned constantly that reviewing exams is much more vital than simply spamming them. I find myself simply looking at questions and saying to myself ‘oh that was it? Why didn’t I think of that’ for many of the questions I get wrong. Furthermore, for section 3, I just don’t quite get how one can improve by reviewing questions they got wrong as section 3 questions are often very variable. Even section 1 the questions are often very unique.
In essence, how do I look at my mistakes and ensure I make less of these in future attempts, despite the variability of all 3 sections.

Thank you
TBH, I didn’t review any questions in any depth during my UMAT prep. I’d sometimes go through S1 questions simply to count up how many I’d misread (and therefore mis-answered due to a dumb mistake and to reinforce for myself to slow down and read the questions properly), but I found reviewing the questions boring, frustrating, and unhelpful. Not to mention a huge waste of time.

Like with all prep recommendations, you need to figure out what works for you. Someone else’s “must do” might be a total time waster for you. The uniqueness of S1 questions makes them especially pointless to review, imo. Tbh, I actually think the S3 questions are probably the most useful to review because they will involve techniques you can learn and apply to multiple subsequent questions, but practicing is also important so ensure a balance. Before I started doing full exams I taught myself most of the S3 mapping techniques, which made reviewing questions much faster and easier. I used these mapping techniques pretty routinely last year (got S3: 64), though others reported that they didn’t use them much. Again, it’s a personal preference thing.

Just my 2c. If you’re finding reviewing questions difficult or confusing, move on and do something useful, like expose yourself to new questions or practice your timing.
 

Lear

Monash BMedSci/MD I
Gold star winner
On the topic of mapping techniques, are there many others other than the 3-2 rule, general mapping and the even odd rule? I’ve also watched some of the Daniel Mill’s YouTube section 3 videos which I have found immensly useful, but I find that often exams don’t typically have those simple geometric shapes and often involve abstract shapes. This is especially true for med entry ones. Is there some sort of comprehensive guide here on the forums or elsewhere speaking of more section 3 techniques? The medentry guides are indeed useful but only to a certain extent.
 

LMG!

Moderator
Admodistrator
On the topic of mapping techniques, are there many others other than the 3-2 rule, general mapping and the even odd rule? I’ve also watched some of the Daniel Mill’s YouTube section 3 videos which I have found immensly useful, but I find that often exams don’t typically have those simple geometric shapes and often involve abstract shapes. This is especially true for med entry ones. Is there some sort of comprehensive guide here on the forums or elsewhere speaking of more section 3 techniques? The medentry guides are indeed useful but only to a certain extent.
I only used the medentry guides, there are probably others, but I found the ME ones were more than enough for me.
 

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