• MSO wishes the best of luck to all users with upcoming interviews! For those interviewing at universities that do not have applicants sign an NDA, it would be greatly appreciated if you could send me (Crow) a PM with your interview questions to help future users. These will not be shared publicly until all interviews for that university have been completed. Cheers! ETA: Please check out our new Interview Portal!

Registered members with 100+ posts do not see Ads

UTAS MBBS: Overview

LMG!

Moderator
Most Helpful Member and Staff Member of the Year 2017-2018
Last edited:

Registered members with 100+ posts do not see Ads

LMG!

Moderator
Most Helpful Member and Staff Member of the Year 2017-2018
MBBS - CAM101

General Information and Semester One (CAM101)

Orientation week is held immediately prior to formal classes starting. For 2019, formal classes start on Feb 25th, so orientation for new students will be the week before. International and RAP offer students are able to attend for 5 days and during this time will also complete their (compulsory) first aid requirement. Non-RAP offer students are required to attend for the final three days.

Compulsory Requirements
First aid certificate (non-international and non-RAP students must facilitate their own completion of this certificate prior to about May)
Vaccinations
Other paperwork (that I now can't really remember the specifics of!)

General Information

Timetable

Students are "required" to keep 8am - 5pm, Monday - Friday free for MBBS related learning. In reality, you are never scheduled this intensively. Monday and Friday starts will alternate between 9, 10, 11am on a rolling basis depending on your CBL class. Tues, Wed, Thurs start times vary similarly. Afternoon lectures and labs can finish anywhere from 1pm - 5pm. Whole days off are rare, but afternoons off are not particularly rare, especially Friday afternoons.

The timetable is a bit annoying as it is only released a week at a time on the Wednesday of the week before and is generally subject to last minute changes (though, tbh, these are fairly minimal, maybe one class per week). This can, however, make scheduling employment tricky, FYI.

Student Life
There is quite a bit of activity on this front, and next year promises the same as UTAS is hosting the AMSA Convention in July. The Tasmanian University Medical Students Society (TUMSS) is pretty active, and organise social evenings and parties. There's also the sports cup between Med, Engineering, and Law that people get involved in.

There are multiple societies, both Med (ie. surgery or pathology interest groups) and non-Med (ie. environment or advocacy or sports based), for those that want to get involved.

Campus
The main Medicine campus is the inner city Medical Science Precinct (a relatively new, and quite architecturally interesting, building opposite the Royal Hobart Hospital), which also houses some classes for Paramedicine and Medical Research, as well as the Menzies Research Institute and the Wicking Dementia Research Institute.

The Clinical Library is located in the Hobart Clinical School, which is at the back of the RHH. This is an incredibly old, and pretty run-down, building in desperate need of some love. I'm not sure it's going to be forthcoming anytime soon! In semester two, pathology labs are completed in the Clinical School. It's about a 5 minute walk from Menzies.

Lecture Recordings
Lectures by regular staff members are recorded and made immediately available. Guest lectures are not recorded, but copies of slides etc are made available. Content by guest lecturers is examinable.


Semester One - Weeks 1-6 (Introductions and Overviews)

Histology: Includes using microscopes, and learning the basic histological features of all four main tissue types. Weekly lectures and labs and some online lectures.
Biochemistry: Introduction to fats, proteins, carbohydrates, metabolism, etc. Weekly lectures and small group tutorials.
Anatomy: Very brief overview of each body system (a whirlwind tour of the body, really). A short series of lectures.
Cell Biology: Weekly lectures. Lots of crossover with histology.
Immunology: Weekly lectures and some small group tutorials.
Clinical Skills: Patient communication, history taking skills. Lectures and small group workshops.
Public Health: Introduction to the importance of this topic, ie. with a strong emphasis on indigenous and rural health. Weekly lectures.
Ethics and Professional Practice: Introduction to medical ethics and the ethical theories that underpin it. Lectures.
Case Based Learning (CBL): Small groups of 10. You stay in these groups for CBL and labs for the entirety of semester 1 and meet on Monday and Friday mornings. The same case is discussed on both Monday and Friday, with small student led presentations occurring on the Friday.

Assessments
Formative exam in week 4 to check your progress.
In week 6 there is a mid year exam on content from weeks 1-5.
There is also a reflective essay due in this time.
CBL presentations are assessed in a pass/fail fashion, with the first two each student presents being formative to let you find your feet.


Semester One - Weeks 7-13 (Integumentary System)

Histology: more detailed focus on epithelium. Weekly lectures and labs, with some online lectures remains the norm.
Microbiology: Particularly of skin infections and common causes. Lectures and labs.
Immunology: Continues with lectures and some small groups tutorials.
Pharmacology: Introduction to the principles of pharmacology. Lectures and small groups tutorials.
Cell Biology: Less focus on this. More a move towards genetics, DNA/RNA, and uses of (ie. PCR). Lectures.
Clinical Skills: Vital signs. Lectures and small group workshops.
Public Health: Continues as per earlier description.
Ethics and Professional Practice: Continues as per earlier description.
CBL: Continues in the same groups as the first part of the semester.

Assessments
Public health based academic essay.
CBL presentations. All are summative by this stage.
Formative history taking OSCE in week 13.
Summative exams in mid year exam period following 1 week of study break. There are three exams, two are pen and paper and a combination of MCQs/EMQs/SAQs. One is an applied exam and is in the laboratory (anatomy, histology, biochemistry, immunology, microbiology, etc).
 
Last edited:

LMG!

Moderator
Most Helpful Member and Staff Member of the Year 2017-2018
Semester Two (CAM102)

Kids and Families Program

In groups of 3, you're allocated to a family that has just had or is about to have a baby. You visit with that family twice over the rest of the semester and will continue to do so in the same group and with the same family over the next two years to observe the baby's development and the family's experiences.

Weeks 1 - 6 (Musculoskeletal System)

Histology: Only a few lectures and labs on this in semester two, focusing on muscle, bone, and cartilage.
Pathology: Lots of path! General introduction to the topic, via lectures and labs. Inflammation, wound healing, etc.
Anatomy: Also lots of anatomy! Lower limbs in the first 6 weeks. Includes weekly lectures, labs, and dissection (practicals and tutorials).
Immunology: Very little of this (phew!). Mainly focused on HHVs. Lectures.
Microbiology: Also very little of this. Lectures and labs.
Statistics and Medical Research: This starts towards the end of the first 6 weeks of semester. Lectures and labs.
Physiology: Of skeletal muscle, including reflexes. Lectures.
Clinical Skills: Lower limb physical examinations. Lectures and workshops.
Public Health: At risk populations and rural health continued. Lectures.
Ethics and Professional Practice: Starts to get a bit more applied. Lectures.
CBL: These continue but with new groups and an emphasis on lower limb MSK presentations.

Assessments
Optional, formative anatomy quizzes.
Mid semester exam on semester two content only.
Ethics and professional practice reflective essay.
Public health academic essay.
CBL presentations.


Rural Week (Week 7)

A compulsory week at the Rural Clinical School on the North West Coast. Topics include farm OHS, rural and remote first aide, and working in rural clinical settings (ie. rural hospitals).


Weeks 8-13 (Musculoskeletal System)

Pathology: Continues. Moves to things like bone cancer, joint pathology, and fractures. Lectures and labs.
Microbiology: Antibiotics and infection control. Lectures and labs.
Anatomy: Moves to the upper limbs and back. Lectures, labs, and dissections (practicals and tutorials).
Nutrition and Dietetics: Overview and then more in depth look at nutrition requirements over the lifespan.
Radiology: Bone and joint imaging.
Physiology: Sensation, perception, and pain.
Immunology: Vaccinations.
Medical Research and Statistics: Continues. Lectures and labs.
Clinical Skills: Upper limb physical examinations, alcohol and drug history taking. Lectures and workshops.
Public Health: Continues. Lectures. One off community health service visit (ie. to Diabetes Tas or to the Cancer Council) in small groups.
Ethics and Professional Practice: Confidentiality, boundaries, countertransference, conscientious objection.
CBL: Continues through until week 12.

Assessments
Optional, formative anatomy quizzes.
Statistics assignment with three parts.
CBL presentations.
Online discussions following Kids and Families Program visits.
Summative OSCE with two stations in week 13.
Three end of year exams. Two pen and paper exams (MCQs/EMQs/SAQs), and one applied exam.
 
Last edited:

Ammiecat

Member
Thank you so much! I really appreciate you investing all this time to map out your year.

Oh my god, this all looks so exciting!

So would you suggest I go out and update my first aid prior to starting semester 1? I know my vaccines are up to date thanks to working at the RHH :)
 

Registered members with 100+ posts do not see Ads

LMG!

Moderator
Most Helpful Member and Staff Member of the Year 2017-2018
Thank you so much! I really appreciate you investing all this time to map out your year.

Oh my god, this all looks so exciting!

So would you suggest I go out and update my first aid prior to starting semester 1? I know my vaccines are up to date thanks to working at the RHH :)
Yeah, I definitely do recommend doing your First Aid certificate prior to uni starting if you can. I didn't and then had to pack it into a weekend when I really had other things I wanted to be doing rather than sitting at St John from 8.30-5 for the day. Just make sure you do the right course.

HLTAID003 Provide first aid - this is a two day course
HLTAID003 Provide first aid - this is the one day version that also has an online component and test that need to be completed before you attend the one day. This is what I did. The online component took about 2 hours, I'd say, so it works out less time consuming than the two day course for the same qualification. Both are acceptable to UTAS. You can also look at non-St John Ambulance courses, but I don't know which of those are equivalent, so can't comment, sorry (for example, I think Red Cross might offer one?).

ETA: Ammiecat, as you're an indigenous applicant, you might be included in the rural/international group that get to do the First Aid certificate during orientation and for free, so you might want to check that out first and save yourself a few $$.

With regard to vaccinations, I also work at the RHH and so thought it would be straight forward but lol, no. There's a two page form you have to take to your GP to get each section individually signed. You need to provide proof of sero-conversion so will need blood tests (if you've not already had them) to check this. I discovered, despite a full vaccination record, I was not immune to multiple things! You also have to be screened for HIV (which was not an RHH requirement at the time I became an employee).

Compliance

Given you're already at the RHH, I'm guessing you have a Working with Vulnerable People card? If so, you just need to get UTAS added to it, which is really easy to do (online), so don't worry about that until you get info during orientation week (as a specific person has to be referenced and I can't confirm you will have the same reference person as I did).

National Police Check is also something you can pre-organise, but they only take about a week to get, so again, no huge hurry with this one if you want to wait until orientation.
 
Last edited:

Ammiecat

Member
I worked as admin in pathology so I didn't get a vulnerable people card. I might look into that and the police check soon.

And good point, I might just get my blood done again to check for immunities as I needed some boosters on childhood vaccinations and I don't recall checking for HIV in that round. (That and I got a tattoo in September haha).

You're probably right about the first aid, I might hold off for now and see what happens in orientation!

I hope you got your exams back and are very happy with the results. :) I'm sure you killed it! You're clearly passionate about it!
 

LMG!

Moderator
Most Helpful Member and Staff Member of the Year 2017-2018
I worked as admin in pathology so I didn't get a vulnerable people card. I might look into that and the police check soon.

And good point, I might just get my blood done again to check for immunities as I needed some boosters on childhood vaccinations and I don't recall checking for HIV in that round. (That and I got a tattoo in September haha).

You're probably right about the first aid, I might hold off for now and see what happens in orientation!

I hope you got your exams back and are very happy with the results. :) I'm sure you killed it! You're clearly passionate about it!
If you do follow up with regard to vaccinations, make sure you print and take this form with you. I see it was updated in November, so should be the final version for your year. As you can see, it's pretty detailed and requires batch numbers and stuff. They make you go back to the GP if it's not fully filled out. My GP didn't sign each line, only the declaration on the last page, and I had to go back because of that.

http://www.utas.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/462631/Tasmanian-Student-Immunisation-Record-Form.pdf

I did get my exam results back and I'm very happy with them, thank you!!!
 

LMG!

Moderator
Most Helpful Member and Staff Member of the Year 2017-2018
CAM101/CAM102 Textbooks and Other Resources

Textbooks
For the most part, I honestly think the exam content very closely replicates the lecture content and you could easily get through first year without purchasing any additional resources, as long as you were someone that could learn effectively from lecture notes. I went through periods of reading textbooks and then ignoring them and just focussing on the lecture notes, and to be honest, I think the textbooks tended to go way too above and beyond (as expected, and obviously still very useful) what was required for exams, so don't feel pressured into shelling out hundreds of dollars for them if you have better things to spend that money on.

If you do work better with textbooks, or would prefer to have some for reference, then these are the ones I used at various points (also, many of the below are available as PDFs, which are obviously perfectly acceptable. As I'm an Old Lady, I'm more used to actual textbooks and so used the 'real thing' more often than not):
Robbins and Cotran: Pathological Basis of Disease. I was given a full version of this textbook by a friend who did Medicine a while ago, so it wasn't the newest edition, but I still used it a fair bit in second semester when we do a lot of pathology. That said, I think I only used it because I had it, because the lecture notes provided for Pathology are so incredibly comprehensive. Roslyn provides a detailed overview of each topic as well as lecture notes, and there is an additional Pathology module on MyLO that includes all the information you need. Pots and models are also available via the online Pathology museum. The resourcing for pathology is seriously excellent, imo, and you really don't need to purchase anything extra.
Rang and Dale: Pharmacology. I used this because I'm really interested in pharmacology, but it absolutely wasn't necessary. Bonnie's lecture notes are really comprehensive and have practice exam questions at the end of each, which I definitely recommend doing.
Netter: Clinical Anatomy. I used this constantly throughout CAM102. It's a smaller text book than the full textbook, and much easier to lug around. I found it incredibly useful for anatomy practicals and studying for exams.
Marieb: Anatomy and Physiology. I probably do recommend a general A&P text, it doesn't have to be this one. I got an older edition of the Marieb one out from the library and because no-one else really wanted it, basically had it for the whole year.
Talley and O'Connor: Clinical Examination. Really not necessary in first year, in my opinion. The only thing I used it for was confirming dermatomes and myotomes as there is some debate about these and UTAS uses the Talley and O'Connor descriptions. I'm assuming it'll get more useful as I progress through the degree, but you can probably give it a miss for first year.
Peakman and Vergani: Basic and Clinical Immunology. This book provides the basis of the immunology lectures so is a useful additional resource for studying and because immunology is awful and you will feel better if you think you have something you can learn from! Haha! Use it like the crutch it will become!
Junqueria: Basic Histology. I purchased this textbook second hand, and did use it, but the histology resources provided are almost as comprehensive as the pathology resources, and along with the digital slide box, it's definitely not necessary to have this textbook.

Other Resources
Weir: Imaging Atlas of Human Anatomy. So, so handy! I really do recommend this resource as the images for anatomy practicals and exams are taken from this text book. It was so good to be able to study using the exact material that was to be used in the applied exam. This would be useful for CAM102 specifically.
Netter: Anatomy Flash Cards. I bought these for CAM102 and for some reason, kept putting off actually using them. I think partly because I was terrified it would just confirm exactly how much I didn't know. This was a very stupid mindset because these are an incredibly useful resource! Also, some of Netter's images are used in exams so, again, a handy and relevant study resource.
Stethoscope: Absolutely not necessary for first year. If you get one for a celebratory gift, then yay, don't turn it down. But you won't need to use it.
Tendon Hammer: Not necessary, but definitely useful for second semester as, so it turns out, reflexes are really awkward to elicit and practicing is useful to build your confidence and your aim!!
Dissection Kit: You will absolutely need one of these, but don't buy one from the Co-Op as it's not the right one. You'll get advice on the exact kit requirements when it comes time to buy one. They're not used until second semester so it's not an urgent purchase. I got mine from Better Life Co. which is in Brisbane Street, about a 5 minute walk from the med building.
Teach Me Anatomy: I didn't use this, but I'd guess that well over 50% of the rest of the class did and one of my friends in particular raves about it. It's free (I think) so worth having a look at in second semester when the anatomy content cranks up.
Optional Anatomy and Histology Quizzes (on MyLO): Definitely do these. There is one for each practical session and you can do them over and over. Derek gets sad when people don't do them.
 

Registered members with 100+ posts do not see Ads

Ammiecat

Member
LMG, You are just amazing. Thank you so very much for all this advice.

Textbooks were exactly what I was wondering about. I remember looking at the Coop bookshop a few months ago and nearly fainted at the book prices. I inherited some of my sister in law's old books but she graduated in 2011 so I think I may pick up some new items too.
 

LMG!

Moderator
Most Helpful Member and Staff Member of the Year 2017-2018
LMG, You are just amazing. Thank you so very much for all this advice.

Textbooks were exactly what I was wondering about. I remember looking at the Coop bookshop a few months ago and nearly fainted at the book prices. I inherited some of my sister in law's old books but she graduated in 2011 so I think I may pick up some new items too.
If/when you do decide to get some books, definitely look around (bookdepository or booktopia, etc). Even with a member discount, Co-Op is verrrry expensive. Plus, if you want to PM me your real name etc (Facebook details), I can see about approving you for access to the UTAS MBBS Textbook sale page on FB for second hand goodies. If you'd rather not, that's totally fine, though :D
 

Ammiecat

Member
No, I would love to be added to the Facebook group, I'll shoot you a PM now. And I agree re Coop. I like Booktopia because it's cheaper and they have afterpay, haha.
 

LMG!

Moderator
Most Helpful Member and Staff Member of the Year 2017-2018
MBBS - CAM201

Semester One - Weeks 1-6 (Cardiovascular System)

Histology: Lectures and practicals specific to histology of the cardiovascular system.
Biochemistry: Metabolism, particularly as it relates to obesity. Lectures.
Anatomy: Cardiac and thoracic wall anatomy and embryology, including regular lectures, dissections, and dry labs. Respiratory anatomy starts in approximately week 5.
Immunology: Largely a repeat of vaccines from year one, plus the cytokine cascade as it relates to septic shock. Lectures (few).
Pharmacology: Lectures and tutorials specific to pharmacology of the cardiovascular system.
Pathology: Lectures and practicals specific to pathology of the cardiovascular system.
Haematology: Lectures and tutorials on topics such as anaemia, transfusions, and the coagulation cascade.
Physiology: Lectures and practicals specific to physiology of the cardiovascular system.
Microbiology: Topics specific to the cardiovascular system, such as: infective endocarditis.
Clinical Skills: Cardiovascular examinations, how to interpret ECGs, and communications skills specific to taking a cardiovascular history.
Nutrition: Lectures focusing on diet and obesity.
Public Health: Lectures focusing on life course models.
Epidemiology: Lectures focusing on error, risk, screening programs, etc.
Ethics and Professional Practice: Lectures focusing on the ethics of treating friends/family/self, and whistleblowing.
Case Based Learning (CBL): Small groups of 10. You stay in these groups for CBL for the entirety of semester 1 and meet on Wednesday mornings.

Assessments
Cardiovascular clinical examination competency and history taking competency.
Mid-semester exam, week 6 (MCQ and EMQ only).
CBL presentations are assessed in a pass/fail fashion.


Semester One - Weeks 7-13 (Respiratory System)

Histology: Lectures and practicals specific to histology of the respiratory system.
Biochemistry: Metabolism, particularly as it relates to obesity. Lectures.
Anatomy: Respiratory anatomy and embryology, including regular lectures, dissections, and dry labs.
Immunology: Lecture on allergy and atopy.
Pharmacology: Lectures and tutorials specific to pharmacology of the respiratory system. Also, pharmacology for pain and fever.
Pathology: Lectures and practicals specific to pathology of the respiratory system.
Physiology: Lectures, tutorials, and practicals specific to physiology of the respiratory system.
Microbiology: Topics specific to the respiratory system, such as: upper respiratory tract infections. Lectures and tutorials.
Clinical Skills: Respiratory examinations, how to interpret chest x-rays and spirometry, and communications skills specific to taking a respiratory history and behaviour change. Lectures and practicals.
Public Health: Lectures focusing on diversity, equality, mental health, cancer, asthma, injury prevention, and dementia.
Epidemiology: Lectures focusing on observational studies, critiquing journal articles, etc.
Case Based Learning (CBL): Small groups of 10. You stay in these groups for CBL for the entirety of semester 1 and meet on Wednesday mornings.


Assessments
Evidence based medicine essay (epidemiology).
Kids and Families Program case report (professional practice).
CBL presentations.
Pharmacology log book interviews.
Respiratory examination clinical competency and history taking competency.
Summative exams in mid year exam period following 1 week of study break. There are three exams, one is a combination of MCQs/EMQs/SAQs, one is a case based paper, and one is an applied exam and is in the laboratory (anatomy, histology, biochemistry, immunology, microbiology, etc).
 
Last edited:

Registered members with 100+ posts do not see Ads

LMG!

Moderator
Most Helpful Member and Staff Member of the Year 2017-2018
MBBS - CAM202

Semester Two - Weeks 1-6 (Gastrointestinal System)

Histology: Lectures and practicals specific to histology of the gastrointestinal system, including the mouth/teeth. Renal histology starts in week 6.
Biochemistry: Metabolism, particularly as it relates to the liver.
Anatomy: Abdominal anatomy and embryology, including regular lectures, dissections, and dry labs. Anatomy of the kidneys and genitourinary system starts in week 5.
Immunology: Mucosal immunity.
Pharmacology: Lectures and tutorials specific to pharmacology of the gastrointestinal system including h. pylori, nausea, vomiting, constipation.
Pathology: Lectures and practicals specific to pathology of the gastrointestinal system, including the oral mucosa and neck.
Physiology: Lectures and practicals specific to physiology of the gastrointestinal system.
Microbiology: Topics specific to the gastrointestinal system, such as: h. pylori, hepatitis, and gastroenteritis.
Radiology: Lectures on imaging of the abdomen.
Clinical and Communication Skills: Gastrointestinal examinations, DREs (models only, real thing in third year), and communications skills specific to taking a gastrointestinal history, as well as alcohol and drug taking histories, and death, dying, and bereavement.
Nutrition: Lectures focusing on food allergies and intolerances, sports nutrition, and nutrition as part of management for specific conditions.
Public Health: Lectures focusing on public health surveillance, vaccine preventable disease, and food borne illnesses.
Ethics and Professional Practice: Lectures focusing on clinical moral reasoning and advocacy.
Case Based Learning (CBL): Small groups of 10. You stay in these groups for CBL for the entirety of semester 2 and meet on Wednesday mornings.

Assessments
Professionalism and leadership essay.
Gastrointestinal clinical examination competency and history taking competency.
Mid-semester exam, week 6 (MCQ and EMQ only).
CBL presentations are assessed in a pass/fail fashion.


Semester Two - Weeks 7-13 (Genitourinary System)

Histology: Lectures and practicals specific to histology of the genitourinary and reproductive systems.
Biochemistry: Metabolism, particularly as it relates to diabetes. Lectures.
Anatomy: Genitourinary anatomy and embryology, including regular lectures, dissections, and dry labs.
Pharmacology: Lectures and tutorials specific to pharmacology of the genitourinary system, including alcohol related, and the oral contraceptive.
Pathology: Lectures and practicals specific to pathology of the genitourinary system, and including renal function.
Physiology: Lectures, tutorials, and practicals specific to physiology of the renal system.
Microbiology: Topics specific to the genitourinary system, such as: urinary tract infection, sexually transmitted infections.
Clinical Skills: Renal examinations, how to interpret ECGs relating to electrolyte imbalances, and communications skills specific to taking a renal and genitourinary/sexual health/pregnancy/menstrual history. Lectures and practicals.
Ethics and Professional Practice: Patient rights and organ donation.
Public Health: Lectures focusing on water borne illnesses and sexually transmitted infections.
Epidemiology: Lectures focusing on qualitative research and systematic reviews.
Case Based Learning (CBL): Small groups of 10. You stay in these groups for CBL for the entirety of semester 2 and meet on Wednesday mornings.
Rural Week: Week 9. In small groups and allocated to various parts of the state.

Assessments
Kids and Families Program online discussion post family visit.
CBL presentations.
Pharmacology log book interviews.
Rural week assessments (Community Health Needs Assessment, and group assignment, once due before, one due after rural week itself).
Genitourinary history taking competency.
Four OSCEs (communication skills, examination skills, integrated case discussion, history taking) during study week.
Summative exams in end of year exam period following 1 week of study break. There are three exams, one is a combination of MCQs/EMQs/SAQs, one is a case based paper, and one is an applied exam and is in the laboratory (anatomy, histology, biochemistry, immunology, microbiology, etc).
 

Registered members with 100+ posts do not see Ads

Top