What is it like being a physiotherapist?

Discussion in 'Physiotherapy' started by Swimmingpotato, Apr 14, 2018.

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  1. Swimmingpotato

    Swimmingpotato New Member

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    Hi,
    From my current study situation, I find that I am able to get into both medicine and physiotherapy but I am not quite sure which career pathways are more suitable for me.

    I have a few questions relating to physiotherapy so any advice would be appreciated :)
    • Do you actually enjoy the content of your physiotherapy lectures/degree?
    • What is your study AND like?
    • What do you do as a physiotherapist?
    • What are advantages and disadvantages of your job?
    • What is the salary?

    It would be really helpful if you can list as many details as possible.

    I'm a cheerful person and love talking as well as making friends with people. Love to smile and love to do a job that you can move around. Love to see people happy and help other people. I think physiotherapy maybe a suitable job for me but I haven't heard many people talking about physiotherapist job so unsure.

    Thanks for any advice ahead!
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2018
  2. Mana

    Mana Resident Medical Officer Administrar

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    Medicine and physiotherapy lend themselves to a lot of similar patient contact as well as anatomy and physiology.

    Mind you, although I have no personal experience studying physiotherapy, don't assume that it's a walk in the park.
     
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  3. Swimmingpotato

    Swimmingpotato New Member

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    Hi,

    Yes, I'm really awared of the heavy workload from the course. I'm doing Health Science First Year from Otago now. Since there are not a lot of posts about physiotherapy, I just want to figure which options match my personailty more.
     
  4. Kat92

    Kat92 Student (BDemCare, BBeSt). Hopeful for JMP 2020

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    I worked as an assistant to physiotherapists on one of my AHA placements and I can tell you the physio's put in enormous hours, planned lots of programs i.e. hydrotherapy, group exercises, saw rehab patients, went to client's homes, attended morning roundings, created their own custom CAM boots and were involved in a lot of the mechanisms of physiology and some anatomy.
     
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  5. speugin

    speugin New Member

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    Hey Swimmingpotato! I'm in my final year of physiotherapy and can help shed some light about the degree:

    1. I do enjoy physio as a whole but definitely not all of it. I went into physio thinking it'll all be musculoskeletal/sports (MSK) work but it's really not. There are 2 other fields, namely: cardiopulmonary (CP) and neurology. Out of those 3, I enjoy CP and neuro a lot more than MSK. I guess it's just more medical and when you go on placement at hospitals, you're working more closely with the medical team in those 2 fields and need to interpret medical reports, bloods (ABGs), x-ray findings, and utilise interventions that have an underlying physiological role.
    2. Study is pretty full on- it's a full on course load with lots of intense study hours. It certainly not a walk in the park. Many hours are put into research and finding the most current evidence based practice to justify interventions and help write essays (critical appraisals, systematic reviews etc). That's just the study side of it- which I actually enjoy quite a lot. Then there is the placement component where you're applying what you've been taught at uni in a clinical setting with an actual patient caseload. Personally, I find getting high marks easier with completing uni subjects than on placement because a certain level of subjectivity comes into play when your clinical educator marks your performance at the end.
    3. Average salary as a new graduate physiotherapist is around $60,000. This depends on whether you work in a private practice or hospital setting- private practice tends to pay more.

    Honestly, if you enjoy making a positive impact and like to see daily changes in someone's function I think physiotherapy is an amazing career path. It's highly rewarding however the work hours are very long and it is a pretty labour intensive job- especially if you work in the stroke rehabilitation ward. If you're trying to transfer into medicine, aim to get a high gpa in the first 2 years of the degree as it may be quite difficult the final 2 years due to harder marking criteria imposed on clinical placements.
     

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