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JCU Student Reviews

DNA

JCU MBBS
Just bringing this thread back up again, sorry if my question comes off as blunt. Do JCU graduates get less 'priority' over more 'regional-oriented' Med school graduates (e.g. USyd, UQ, UMelb, etc) in terms of obtaining internships (in major cities) and finally, their jobs as practitioners in the major cities like Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, etc? Does JCU mould their training in a way such that their students are better off in practice at rural areas rather than the major cities?
No, once you graduate you are on the same level as every other medical graduate in Australia. Your chances of obtaining an internship in a particular city/hospital are determined by the state’s preference system. Most states give higher priority to their own students. JCU may give you more rural exposure but in the end, all graduates should have the competency to work as an intern anywhere in Australia.
 

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Benjamin

ICU Reg (JCU)
Emeritus Staff
Just bringing this thread back up again, sorry if my question comes off as blunt. Do JCU graduates get less 'priority' over more 'regional-oriented' Med school graduates (e.g. USyd, UQ, UMelb, etc) in terms of obtaining internships (in major cities) and finally, their jobs as practitioners in the major cities like Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, etc? Does JCU mould their training in a way such that their students are better off in practice at rural areas rather than the major cities?
No, all QLD universities have the same priority for domestic graduates from within QLD. There is a statistical trend towards JCU graduates opting to stay in regional areas for their internship but this is not driven by a difference in selection process.

There is a difference when it comes to internship applications for international students but I have talked about that in depth before and won't go into it here.

As discussed above there is some inequality between JCU compared with USYD etc in terms of exposure and therefore job opportunity in certain specialties.
 
No, all QLD universities have the same priority for domestic graduates from within QLD. There is a statistical trend towards JCU graduates opting to stay in regional areas for their internship but this is not driven by a difference in selection process.

There is a difference when it comes to internship applications for international students but I have talked about that in depth before and won't go into it here.

As discussed above there is some inequality between JCU compared with USYD etc in terms of exposure and therefore job opportunity in certain specialties.
hey, bringing up this thread again. I have a couple Qs about JCU... after an internship, would JCU students be disadvantaged in terms of actually practicing in major urban areas eg Brisbane, SYD etc.
I'm kinda confused about specialisation- throughout this thread I'm seeing that the JCU program directs you to generalisation? would I be better off going to another uni if I wanted to specialise in psychiatry or oncology?
does a QLD degree disadvantage you from working in other states in anyway? (I'd prefer to move back to NSW after graduating...)
thank you!!
 

Crow

Staff
Moderator
hey, bringing up this thread again. I have a couple Qs about JCU... after an internship, would JCU students be disadvantaged in terms of actually practicing in major urban areas eg Brisbane, SYD etc.
Brisbane? No. Sydney? Yes, but not because you studied at JCU specifically, but because you are graduating outside of NSW.
I'm kinda confused about specialisation- throughout this thread I'm seeing that the JCU program directs you to generalisation? would I be better off going to another uni if I wanted to specialise in psychiatry or oncology?
You can pursue any specialty you like after graduating from JCU's program. All medical degrees in Australia will allow you to go into whichever pathway you like.
does a QLD degree disadvantage you from working in other states in anyway? (I'd prefer to move back to NSW after graduating...)
I encouraged you in another post to become familiar with how each state allocates internship positions. I am going to re-suggest that you do this so that you are familiar with the process - as I said, ideally if you want to work in NSW after you graduate, your best chance would be to do your medical degree in NSW.
 

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Hillard49

Lurker
Just to follow up on billolillo's comment as I have basically been wondering the exact same things they have just asked... are internships always based solely only on the priority preferences of the state rather than the applicants CV or grades etc? I have heard that Victoria considers this whereas NSW does not and only chooses based on their priorities system. I have also heard that it is extremely difficult to come back to NSW if we are graduating outside the state, could someone please comment on the chances of this? I have read the HETI medical applicant allocation guide and an interstate graduate who completes Y12 in the state NSW is given priority number 2, but It still sounds like the chances are slim based off what others are saying? I have also heard that some hospitals have turned down JCU applicants for the reason that they are more specialised in rural tropical medicine, but how is this possible if the allocation system is 'only' based off the priority preferences?

As discussed above there is some inequality between JCU compared with USYD etc in terms of exposure and therefore job opportunity in certain specialties.
What do you mean by this in terms of the 'inequality' you mentioned?
 

TKAO

oowah!
Valued Member
What do you mean by this in terms of the 'inequality' you mentioned?
Not benjamin but I'm pretty sure he is referring to the types of cases/volume of cases and specialties that one may be exposed to in JCU vs. USYD (for example). Due to the fact that many of the other medical schools are located in large cities, they also have access to large tertiary centres which accomodate many specialties that might not otherwise be found (or may not have the same case mix) as rural areas. Ultimately, a medical degree is a medical degree however and if you really want to do a specialty, you'll always find a way.
 

Crow

Staff
Moderator
I have also heard that some hospitals have turned down JCU applicants for the reason that they are more specialised in rural tropical medicine, but how is this possible if the allocation system is 'only' based off the priority preferences?
The answers to all of your other questions can be found easily through a quick Google +/- in the internship threads in the forum (and are off-topic for this thread anyway) so I won’t answer those, but I’ll address that this statement is completely false - I’d be concerned about whoever/wherever it was that you got the info from.
 

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Benjamin

ICU Reg (JCU)
Emeritus Staff
I'm kinda confused about specialisation - throughout this thread I'm seeing that the JCU program directs you to generalisation? would I be better off going to another uni if I wanted to specialise in psychiatry or oncology?
No, psychiatry is a very easy specialty to get into as the demand is very high and a lot of people don't want to do it. Oncology is part of physician training & so the bottleneck is not getting into the training program as this is possible from almost any regional sized hospital but instead getting an advanced trainee job -- your medical school & exposure will have very little influence from that point on.

What do you mean by this in terms of the 'inequality' you mentioned?
There are some specialties that are incredibly difficult to get into without having prior exposure and experience, most of these tend to be surgical specialties (neurosurgery, ENT, cardiothoracics, transplant etc.) and usually have intern level jobs available if your hospital has that service. While internships are mostly allocated based on ballot systems (more about this below) the actual rotations that you get offered is... less transparent.

If you went to a medical school that had placements where you spent time on these specialties then you might have a better chance at getting an intern or a resident job on them -- you are already known to the department & that effectively serves as an interview process. Similarly, there are resident level jobs where getting a spot is almost impossible unless you have prior experience, i.e. there are PGY2 jobs that you will likely never get unless you did an intern position or are known to the department in another way (medical school, working extra shifts in their clinics, nepotism etc.)

My point is that JCU has all of these specialties available but only at their Townsville campus in clinical years -- if you are allocated to another campus you may never even see a cardiothoracic surgeon unless you go to a big tertiary hospital, as such you are relatively disadvantaged in applying for a cardiothoracic training position compared to someone who did clinical time in a hospital that has CTS.

This inequality of medical school exposure only really matters for resident jobs that are difficult to get without prior experience, i.e. those that are competitive even to get intern terms in. For the vast majority of specialties this exposure inequality will not impact you at all & if you are truly interested in them then you can always try and stay at Townsville.

Just to follow up on billolillo's comment as I have basically been wondering the exact same things they have just asked... are internships always based solely only on the priority preferences of the state rather than the applicants CV or grades etc?
This is covered elsewhere in excruciating detail. In short, priority 1 candidates in QLD are ballot. Everything else is 'merit based' and the priority system means nothing beyonid P1 candidates -- hospitals can choose a P7 candidate over a P2 if they have better CV / interview etc.
 

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