Registered members with 100+ posts do not see Ads

Common pitfalls to avoid for year 12 school leavers and other medicine applicants

Crow

Moderator Band
Moderator
I can't believe I missed those post. It was extremely insightful!

I might be missing something but is the Chancellors program and the Guaranteed pathway the same concept?
As quoted 96 AND ABOVE
'Applicants who receive an ATAR (or notional ATAR) between 99.00 and 99.85 in Year 12 and commence and complete an undergraduate course at the University of Melbourne with a weighted average mark of 75% or higher are guaranteed an Australian fee place (for domestic students) or international fee place.'

Does this involve the same concept of being given only an interview NOT an actual place?
I find it very surprising they would not mention this on the website, almost concerning.

If it does actually *gaurantee* one a spot, would one be better off doing a 'lower tier' course such as Bachelor of Science or sticking to Biomedicine?
I believe to be eligible for this gaurantee one has to do either and I was wondering whether it matters which a person completes in order for good prospects in Medicine in the future.

Thank you
Yes, it "guarantees" an interview only - IIRC a person has to "pass" 5 out of 8 stations in the interview to be given a place offer. Important point is that this is for a full fee paying place, which costs $295 000, and does not guarantee an internship position upon graduation.

No, your undergraduate degree will not affect your career prospects in medicine.
 

Registered members with 100+ posts do not see Ads

Mana

Registrar
Admodistrator
I can't believe I missed those post. It was extremely insightful!

I might be missing something but is the Chancellors program and the Guaranteed pathway the same concept?
As quoted 96 AND ABOVE
'Applicants who receive an ATAR (or notional ATAR) between 99.00 and 99.85 in Year 12 and commence and complete an undergraduate course at the University of Melbourne with a weighted average mark of 75% or higher are guaranteed an Australian fee place (for domestic students) or international fee place.'

Does this involve the same concept of being given only an interview NOT an actual place?
I find it very surprising they would not mention this on the website, almost concerning.

If it does actually *gaurantee* one a spot, would one be better off doing a 'lower tier' course such as Bachelor of Science or sticking to Biomedicine?
I believe to be eligible for this gaurantee one has to do either and I was wondering whether it matters which a person completes in order for good prospects in Medicine in the future.

Thank you
This is the important line in question from Graduate course guarantees -

"The guarantee is subject to meeting course prerequisites for the graduate degree. No minimum Grade Point Average is required in your undergraduate degree, however you may be required to meet course prerequisites and satisfy other requirements for specific courses, such as an interview."

This is further explained if you click on the Health Sciences category below on that site, where you'll find this under the entry for the MD:

"Applicants interested in studying the Doctor of Medicine (MD) must pass an interview to be eligible for the guaranteed entry pathway. The interview is a threshold process designed to ensure that students who apply for the MD have adequate interpersonal and communication skills to successfully complete the course."
 

Jennat

Jenn Aye
Hello Mana,
I'm new here but something you wrote sparked my interest and I just have to ask- pitfall #1. You see I'm an Aussie and I graduated highchool in Dubai with an ATAR of 99.4 (over here the school year starts in September and ends in June). So my plan is as follows:
-I did the UMAT this year.
-If my score isn't high enough, i'll join some prep courses and do it next year. Keeping in mind that i've already been accepted in the med schools here which consist of 1 foundation year+ 6 years medicine+ internship. The foundation year is what i'll be doing in the meantime, while studying for UMAT 2019.
-Sit UMAT 2019 and hope for the best.
If that too doesn't get me into direct medicine I was thinking of just completing my medical degree here and then moving back to Australia, but now I'm not so sure. What do you think?
I'd be more than happy if you could give me some pointers. Thanks in advance!
 

sarangiya

UNSW BMed/MD I
Hello Mana,
I'm new here but something you wrote sparked my interest and I just have to ask- pitfall #1. You see I'm an Aussie and I graduated highchool in Dubai with an ATAR of 99.4 (over here the school year starts in September and ends in June). So my plan is as follows:
-I did the UMAT this year.
-If my score isn't high enough, i'll join some prep courses and do it next year. Keeping in mind that i've already been accepted in the med schools here which consist of 1 foundation year+ 6 years medicine+ internship. The foundation year is what i'll be doing in the meantime, while studying for UMAT 2019.
-Sit UMAT 2019 and hope for the best.
If that too doesn't get me into direct medicine I was thinking of just completing my medical degree here and then moving back to Australia, but now I'm not so sure. What do you think?
I'd be more than happy if you could give me some pointers. Thanks in advance!
Sounds like it will depend on your family's background lol.
If you are an Australian citizen living in Dubai (not a citizen) then you would be considered an international student there, right? I would imagine you'd have to pay full fee, which isn't cheap in any country. But hey, if you have they money then who is going to stop you? Well, maybe internship placements. Can't be sure though.
Would you rather work in Dubai or in Australia? If it's the latter I think your best and easiest option is to try out for Australian medical schools.

I'll let others weigh in though ! Good luck
 

Registered members with 100+ posts do not see Ads

Mana

Registrar
Admodistrator
Hello Mana,
I'm new here but something you wrote sparked my interest and I just have to ask- pitfall #1. You see I'm an Aussie and I graduated highchool in Dubai with an ATAR of 99.4 (over here the school year starts in September and ends in June). So my plan is as follows:
-I did the UMAT this year.
-If my score isn't high enough, i'll join some prep courses and do it next year. Keeping in mind that i've already been accepted in the med schools here which consist of 1 foundation year+ 6 years medicine+ internship. The foundation year is what i'll be doing in the meantime, while studying for UMAT 2019.
-Sit UMAT 2019 and hope for the best.
If that too doesn't get me into direct medicine I was thinking of just completing my medical degree here and then moving back to Australia, but now I'm not so sure. What do you think?
I'd be more than happy if you could give me some pointers. Thanks in advance!
Just to clarify, if you have been accepted into medical school in Dubai, does that mean that you have been accepted into the whole course, or that you are in the Foundation year and that you have to outperform the majority of people to then be able to proceed to medicine (similar to Otago/Auckland?)


In any case:
If you are an Australian citizen and complete your medical degree in Dubai, you almost certainly won't be getting an internship in Australia, and you'll have to go through the Competent Pathway to be able to practice in Australia. While I'm not an expert on the system in Dubai or the UAE, if they are anything like (almost) any other country in the world, then to do your medical degree there without having citizenship or permanent residency there means you're also disadvantaged in terms of getting training positions (i.e. internships) from there as well, and you may end up with what is essentially a useless degree (if the UAE won't give you a training position and Australia won't give you a training position which is a very real possibility through this pathway.) As a citizen of Australia, you'll be freely able to move back to Australia, but as a medical graduate of a non-Australian medical school without an internship, you won't be able to practice medicine (which defeats the purpose of doing medicine in the first place and moving back to Australia.)

To use the competent pathway you will have to already have done an internship somewhere (most likely in the UAE, obviously), so this pathway is not without risk. You will then have to find a position in an Australian hospital and be accepted here (which is quite hard if you are applying anywhere with reasonable supply i.e. anywhere metropolitan) and then apply to the AMC for registration - you can find more information on this pathway at Medical Board of Australia - Competent Authority pathway

If you are a citizen/permanent resident of the UAE (whether or not you are also a citizen of Australia), then you're probably on an equal footing with locals from the UAE doing medicine there, in which case, doing your degree in the UAE will likely mean you end up practicing medicine there. If you want to live there in the long term and you want to practice medicine there in the long term, then this is a reasonable pathway to take. Obviously, if you are not a citizen/permanent resident of the UAE, then doing medicine there is going to attract international student fees AND put you at a huge disadvantage in terms of doing internship.

Frankly, by far the best pathway to take if you want to practice medicine in Australia is to actually do your medical degree in Australia, but whether this happens is obviously dependent on your performance in the selection criteria.
 

Jennat

Jenn Aye
Just to clarify, if you have been accepted into medical school in Dubai, does that mean that you have been accepted into the whole course, or that you are in the Foundation year and that you have to outperform the majority of people to then be able to proceed to medicine (similar to Otago/Auckland?)


In any case:
If you are an Australian citizen and complete your medical degree in Dubai, you almost certainly won't be getting an internship in Australia, and you'll have to go through the Competent Pathway to be able to practice in Australia. While I'm not an expert on the system in Dubai or the UAE, if they are anything like (almost) any other country in the world, then to do your medical degree there without having citizenship or permanent residency there means you're also disadvantaged in terms of getting training positions (i.e. internships) from there as well, and you may end up with what is essentially a useless degree (if the UAE won't give you a training position and Australia won't give you a training position which is a very real possibility through this pathway.) As a citizen of Australia, you'll be freely able to move back to Australia, but as a medical graduate of a non-Australian medical school without an internship, you won't be able to practice medicine (which defeats the purpose of doing medicine in the first place and moving back to Australia.)

To use the competent pathway you will have to already have done an internship somewhere (most likely in the UAE, obviously), so this pathway is not without risk. You will then have to find a position in an Australian hospital and be accepted here (which is quite hard if you are applying anywhere with reasonable supply i.e. anywhere metropolitan) and then apply to the AMC for registration - you can find more information on this pathway at Medical Board of Australia - Competent Authority pathway

If you are a citizen/permanent resident of the UAE (whether or not you are also a citizen of Australia), then you're probably on an equal footing with locals from the UAE doing medicine there, in which case, doing your degree in the UAE will likely mean you end up practicing medicine there. If you want to live there in the long term and you want to practice medicine there in the long term, then this is a reasonable pathway to take. Obbviously, if you are not a citizen/permanent resident of the UAE, then doing medicine there is going to attract international student fees AND put you at a huge disadvantage in terms of doing internship.

Frankly, by far the best pathway to take if you want to practice medicine in Australia is to actually do your medical degree in Australia, but whether this happens is obviously dependent on your performance in the selection criteria.
First of all, thank you for the thorough reply Mana (and you too Sarangiya!). To answer some of you guys' questions:
-No I am not considered a citizen here. No-one other than the locals here (which make up ~13% f the population) are considered citizens.
-Yes the fees are unbelievably high. One full year in medical school costs about 37,000 Australian dollars, and there are five of them! But the "discounts" are pretty generous- sometimes reaching up to 95% off, depending on your GPA. And they're not that unattainable either.
-The university that offers the foundation year course doesn't guarantee you enter medicine after it as there are some requirements you have to meet- GPA wise. But it is very doable and I know many who have progressed to the next stage.
-Internships here are given to both noncitizens and citizens. The priority is definitely given to the locals, but since hardly any locals enter medicine, as they lean towards occupations that are strictly/only beneficial for locals, (such as aviation, police academies, business (every business in the UAE must be in the name of a local), etc.) the rest of us get a chance and the internship stage isn't too much of hassle.
-NO I don't want to stay in the UAE, i'v been living here for five years and I just wanna come home already :( haha.
I hope I answered everything.
While I agree that i'll most likely take the Competent Pathway, I found something on the World Directory of Medical Schools (I was told it was a reliable source?) which I hope can make my transition easier. Here's the link: School Detail. Basically, one of the unis thats offered me a place supposedly has "formed a partnership with Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, for the faculties of medicine, nursing and health sciences." I did check the website of the uni itself and it says that they have signed "Cooperation agreements" with Monash University (and the University of Adelaide), and when asked about these agreements they said it had to do with the curriculum, programs and exchanging professors. I also called up Monash (at 4am *cries*) and they said that they were in no position to comment, have no permission to speak and that they've never heard of UoS :''')
Please tell me you know something about this and that it'll land me an internship in Australia- wishful thinking I know. Maybe I'm just grasping at straws here? I don't know.

Thanks again for taking the time to help. Really appreciate it
 

Mana

Registrar
Admodistrator
Replying on mobile on my night shift at the moment so will keep this brief:

The universities (Monash in question here) are not responsible for allocating you an internship - this is done through PMCV. Regardless of any agreements with the universities the PMCV (or equivalent in other Australian states) will allocate internships based on your priority (for which graduates of non AMC recognised medical schools such as all of them in Dubai are not even on the list). That is, I guarantee that if you go to medical school in Dubai that you will absolutely never be able to use that to get an internship in Australia (so you'll need to use the Competent Pathway).
 

Registered members with 100+ posts do not see Ads

Mana

Registrar
Admodistrator

pi

Junior doctor
Admodistrator
Jennat regarding your plan of starting uni in Dubai with the intention of also sitting the UMAT next year (assuming this year doesn't go as planned) is a dangerous one, many Aussie unis won't take you if you have started a tertiary degree. Just FYI.
 

Eliden

New Member
Hi there and welcome to MSO.

To answer the easy things first:
If you were to apply to medicine in Australia, either through the UMAT(undergraduate) or the GAMSAT(graduate) pathways, most times the mark that they would look at would actually be the mark of your most recently completed *bachelors level* degree. Thus, doing a masters often does not help in terms of admission. (A PhD, on the other hand, is often looked upon very favourably, and some schools will automatically grant a PhD holder a 7.0 GPA). This varies a little between schools, so your mileage may vary - but as a general rule, if I were to do a degree trying to get into medicine, and I already had a career pathway (i.e. that business degree) which I could use for a job, I would consider doing a PhD. Bear in mind that a PhD is one heck of a lot of work.

Unfortunately my expertise isn't in the NZ entry pathways, and I suggest that you ask in the NZ subforum of MSO - they know their stuff well. However, my understanding is that for entry to medicine in NZ at either Otago or Auckland, the marks from the first year you did at that university are the ones that count. In this case, provided that you actually do get those "stellar" marks (bearing in mind that literally everyone else doing those courses is also aiming for stellar marks for the exact same purpose as you are - to get into medicine), then you stand as good a chance as the next applicant providing your UMAT score is also up to scratch.
Hi Mana,

How certain are you that it must be a bachelor degree GPA that is considered? I started my bachelor degree back in 2002, what feels like an eternity ago. I was young and stupid; didn't show up to exams, had multiple failures. I had no interest in achieving a decent GPA and wasn't even sure that I wanted to finish the degree at all. After a couple of years off, I went back to uni and completed the degree (2009) but needless to say my GPA never fully recovered and is not one I want shared with the universities I'll be applying to.

In my late twenties I went back to uni and spent two years completing a graduate diploma and achieved a 6.6 GPA. My focus was far better and I was committed.

I really hope that only my latest postgrad study is considered. I can't see what relevance my bachelor degree holds, given I started it around the same time most of the people taking UMAT this year were born! I have two kids now and have no interest in mucking around.

The uni I'm most keen to attend states that a credit GPA is all that's required for applicants with postgraduate diploma (although i'm sure in actuality this is only the bare minimum, and that it must be a lot higher, along with a successful UMAT score and interview of course). Are you saying that unis will consider bachelor degrees even when expressly stated in their application info that they will only consider the most recent uni study? Do I need to be worried?

How does the application process through UAC work for non school leavers?
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
I really hope that only my latest postgrad study is considered.
There are ~20 med schools in Aus, some are undergrad some are grad schools some are a mix of two. Their admission requirements differ a lot, for example if you search for Gemsas Guide & read through its 100 pages you will see a dozen different ways they consider one's GPA. UQ is one that considers Grad Dip on its own.

Are you saying that unis will consider bachelor degrees even when expressly stated in their application info that they will only consider the most recent uni study? Do I need to be worried?
Mana said this to those who would be applying to grad schools (ref Gemsas above). Apart from its GPA your Bachelor is about to exceed the 10yo rule by many of these schools.

The uni I'm most keen to attend states that a credit GPA is all that's required for applicants with postgraduate diploma (although i'm sure in actuality this is only the bare minimum, and that it must be a lot higher, along with a successful UMAT score and interview of course).
This is presumably JMP (UoN/UNE)? If so they will consider your Grad Dip & its own GPA. Credit is a hurdle mark to be eligible, higher GPA isn't necessary since interview selection is based entirely on UMAT and place offers entirely on the interview.

WSU is also available, similar rules as JMP's but UMAT requirement much higher. Have a look in the link in my signature below.

How does the application process through UAC work for non school leavers?
UAC application opens in August, the same process for school leavers as for non. Good luck.
 

Registered members with 100+ posts do not see Ads

Eliden

New Member
There are ~20 med schools in Aus, some are undergrad some are grad schools some are a mix of two. Their admission requirements differ a lot, for example if you search for Gemsas Guide & read through its 100 pages you will see a dozen different ways they consider one's GPA. UQ is one that considers Grad Dip on its own.


Mana said this to those who would be applying to grad schools (ref Gemsas above). Apart from its GPA your Bachelor is about to exceed the 10yo rule by many of these schools.


This is presumably JMP (UoN/UNE)? If so they will consider your Grad Dip & its own GPA. Credit is a hurdle mark to be eligible, higher GPA isn't necessary since interview selection is based entirely on UMAT and place offers entirely on the interview.

WSU is also available, similar rules as JMP's but UMAT requirement much higher. Have a look in the link in my signature below.


UAC application opens in August, the same process for school leavers as for non. Good luck.
Thanks very much A1!

Yes indeed, I'm most interested in the JMP. Crossing all my fingers and toes.

Also, can't see any signature on your post..
 
Last edited:

LMG!

Moderator
Admodistrator
Hi Mana,

How certain are you that it must be a bachelor degree GPA that is considered? I started my bachelor degree back in 2002, what feels like an eternity ago. I was young and stupid; didn't show up to exams, had multiple failures. I had no interest in achieving a decent GPA and wasn't even sure that I wanted to finish the degree at all. After a couple of years off, I went back to uni and completed the degree (2009) but needless to say my GPA never fully recovered and is not one I want shared with the universities I'll be applying to.

In my late twenties I went back to uni and spent two years completing a graduate diploma and achieved a 6.6 GPA. My focus was far better and I was committed.

I really hope that only my latest postgrad study is considered. I can't see what relevance my bachelor degree holds, given I started it around the same time most of the people taking UMAT this year were born! I have two kids now and have no interest in mucking around.

The uni I'm most keen to attend states that a credit GPA is all that's required for applicants with postgraduate diploma (although i'm sure in actuality this is only the bare minimum, and that it must be a lot higher, along with a successful UMAT score and interview of course). Are you saying that unis will consider bachelor degrees even when expressly stated in their application info that they will only consider the most recent uni study? Do I need to be worried?

How does the application process through UAC work for non school leavers?
I was in pretty much your exact position, timeline-wise, with regard to bachelor degree completion.

I agree completely with everything A1 has said re. non-standard applications to undergrad programs via UMAT, so won’t add to that.

Regarding graduate entry Med via GAMSAT, unfortunately your first bachelor GPA will largely rule you out of most, and it doesn’t matter how long ago it was completed. The 10 year rule that A1 quotes above only comes into play with regard to recency of tertiary level study, not completion of your bachelor degree, so you can virtually never outrun it (with some exceptions that I’ll detail).

For example, if you completed your first bachelor degree more than 10 years ago (which I had when I was doing my applications), BUT you have undertaken tertiary level study of some kind (could be a new bachelor, could be a grad dip, could be a masters, whatever...) in the last 10 years, then all unis will deem you eligible to apply (some have requirements for how long you need to have studied, ie. some will say 1 semester full time, some say a whole year full time, but regardless, you’d largely tick off the 10 year rule requirement). BUT, most unis will still use your first bachelor GPA to calculate your GEMSAS GPA. The ONLY unis who indicated they would NOT use my bachelor and would instead use my postgraduate GPA were Griffith, UQ, and UWA. I didn’t check with Flinders, but all other grad med unis confirmed they would still use my bachelor GPA, despite the fact it was 10+ years old and I’d finished a doctorate level degree by then.

I guess I just let you know this so you can definitely set your sights on undergrad/UMAT med, where this won’t be an issue (which is also what I did).

Best of luck!!

ETA: for some reason, signatures are not supported if you’re accessing MSO via smartphone (or, at least, via iPhone, like me!), so that could be why you don’t see it, I don’t see it either.

I suspect this is the link A1 was referring to: [Undergrad] - 2017-18 Med schools Selection Criteria Y12s & Non-standards
 

Eliden

New Member
I was in pretty much your exact position, timeline-wise, with regard to bachelor degree completion.

I agree completely with everything A1 has said re. non-standard applications to undergrad programs via UMAT, so won’t add to that.

Regarding graduate entry Med via GAMSAT, unfortunately your first bachelor GPA will largely rule you out of most, and it doesn’t matter how long ago it was completed. The 10 year rule that A1 quotes above only comes into play with regard to recency of tertiary level study, not completion of your bachelor degree, so you can virtually never outrun it (with some exceptions that I’ll detail).

For example, if you completed your first bachelor degree more than 10 years ago (which I had when I was doing my applications), BUT you have undertaken tertiary level study of some kind (could be a new bachelor, could be a grad dip, could be a masters, whatever...) in the last 10 years, then all unis will deem you eligible to apply (some have requirements for how long you need to have studied, ie. some will say 1 semester full time, some say a whole year full time, but regardless, you’d largely tick off the 10 year rule requirement). BUT, most unis will still use your first bachelor GPA to calculate your GEMSAS GPA. The ONLY unis who indicated they would NOT use my bachelor and would instead use my postgraduate GPA were Griffith, UQ, and UWA. I didn’t check with Flinders, but all other grad med unis confirmed they would still use my bachelor GPA, despite the fact it was 10+ years old and I’d finished a doctorate level degree by then.

I guess I just let you know this so you can definitely set your sights on undergrad/UMAT med, where this won’t be an issue (which is also what I did).

Best of luck!!

ETA: for some reason, signatures are not supported if you’re accessing MSO via smartphone (or, at least, via iPhone, like me!), so that could be why you don’t see it, I don’t see it either.

I suspect this is the link A1 was referring to: [Undergrad] - 2017-18 Med schools Selection Criteria Y12s & Non-standards
Thank you very much LMG!

I appreciate you spending the time to share your story. Yes, I've been using my phone so that may explain the missing signature.

After reading the advice on here I've had a look through the gemsas guide and it appears the only hope I'd have for graduate entry would be UQ or Notre Dame. UQ considers Grad Dip as a key degree which is great, but there's no way our family of 4 could up sticks to QLD.

Notre Dame would include my Grad Dip GPA as part of 3 years FTE GPA calculation. That would mean they'd have to include the last year of my bachelor degree in 2009 (which was not too bad, around a credit average..) That would still leave me with a weighted GPA well over 6 so it's a possibility. However, I am not clear on whether the final six or seven subjects I did to finish my degree in 2009 constitute enough to be considered a FTE year.. If not, if they had to go back to previous years for credit points then those marks would be substantially worse. Seriously, I was such an idiot! I wish I could slap my former self.

In any case, I would really prefer the undergrad path and the JMP would actually be a lot more local for me than having to commute to Sydney. So I hope my UMAT can cut it! Scared about the S1 >58 requirement I've just seen in the table you posted. I thought it was only 50 required (s1 is my weakest section). Not much I can do about it now though... Holding my breath until September.

Thanks again to you mods xx
 
Last edited:

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
However, I am not clear on whether the final six or seven subjects I did to finish my degree in 2009 constitute enough to be considered a FTE year.. If not, if they had to go back to previous years for credit points then those marks would be substantially worse.
Assuming your Grad Dip was 2 years full-time/equivalent they will count 1 more FTE (usually 8 units) from your Bach degree. Since you did 6-7 units in 2009 they will add 1-2 units from the year before. I'm not sure how they pick these 1-2 out of the units you did that year, but unlikely they will use the whole of that year.

I hope my UMAT can cut it! Scared about the S1 >58 requirement I've just seen in the table you posted. I thought it was only 50 required
The stated 50/50/50 requirement means having any section <50 disqualifies you. Passing this the next rule applies, that is interview invites are issued based on UMAT S1 score. They simply go down the S1 ranking list until the 700ish spots run out, we call that the cutoff. Previous years it cut off at S1=60, last year happened to be 58. We can't tell what this year will be but probably around 58-60 like before.
 

Registered members with 100+ posts do not see Ads

LYZ2305

New Member
Hi Guys,

Wondering if you could help me out here. I’m interested in applying for Med through Graduate Entry (2020 intake) I’m finishing my current degree with an GPA of around 6.6.

However, when I first graduated from highschool I did 1 year of bachelor in Architecture in which I really disliked. I also didn’t score very well and transferred to my current degree after 1 year.

I was wondering if my marks from the 1 year I did architecture would be counted towards my GPA when applying to med school.

Thanks!
 

Crow

Moderator Band
Moderator
Hi Guys,

Wondering if you could help me out here. I’m interested in applying for Med through Graduate Entry (2020 intake) I’m finishing my current degree with an GPA of around 6.6.

However, when I first graduated from highschool I did 1 year of bachelor in Architecture in which I really disliked. I also didn’t score very well and transferred to my current degree after 1 year.

I was wondering if my marks from the 1 year I did architecture would be counted towards my GPA when applying to med school.

Thanks!
Only the results from your most recent bachelor's degree will be used. :)
 

Eliden

New Member
The stated 50/50/50 requirement means having any section <50 disqualifies you. Passing this the next rule applies, that is interview invites are issued based on UMAT S1 score. They simply go down the S1 ranking list until the 700ish spots run out, we call that the cutoff. Previous years it cut off at S1=60, last year happened to be 58. We can't tell what this year will be but probably around 58-60 like before.
Ah I see. Thanks for clarifying the process. Makes sense.
 

Registered members with 100+ posts do not see Ads

Registered members with 100+ posts do not see Ads

Top