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Practice Interview Question Thread

H2.

Member
Universities have moved away from these questions because at the end of the day it will help immensely if you had medical knowledge.

The defintion of DNR is that you do not resuscitate the patient if they go into cardiac arrest. All other measures in keeping them alive are determined by their advanced care directive if they had one or their next of kin. Just because they have life threatening injuries doesn't mean you cannot treat the patient.

In these kind of scenarios, the order would either score you minimal or no marks. It's testing your biases, sensitivity, ethical reasoning etc.. It doesn't matter if the wound or injury was self-inflicted your duty of care as a doctor is to provide equal access to care where possible. Just because a patient "ate fatty foods" or if the incident was "an accident" doesn't justify who gets seen first. It's always going to be treating the most severe injuries first as per the Triage system set up in emergency departments.

From a medical perspective imo the burns victim is probably most severe or the pregnant lady (depends on the situation). Again its very circumstantial as vital sign stability is the key component to assessment. If they are stable then you can treat the problem temporarily to buy you more time until it can be treated later. For example with the bleeding, pressure and retraction of the skin/tissue over the bleed will stem the flow of blood. I've seen AMI patients walk around for days before presenting to ED and on the other hand I have had to perform CPR on those that have arrested.
It says in the scenario assume all four patients are of equal medical severity. Hence, isn't this an ethical dilemma, not based on medical knowledge?given the triage system cannot work in this case.
 

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whoartthou

Regular Member
It says in the scenario assume all four patients are of equal medical severity. Hence, isn't this an ethical dilemma, not based on medical knowledge?given the triage system cannot work in this case.
Then really it is not a realistic question because you can't be biased in your choice therefore, any reasoning would be invalid.
 
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H2.

Member
PhD research (Ethical Decision Making)

You are a PhD student. Your research over the last three years has been groundbreaking and amazingly productive. You are to present your research at a conference in a month’s time to a forum of world leaders in your field. This will cement your career permanently. Your supervisor submits your research to a prestigious journal without your knowledge and/or consent. As a final confirmatory round of experiments, a key result indicates that your central hypothesis is no longer valid.


  • What do you do?
  • Was it right for your supervisor to submit your work?
  • Should you attend the conference?
  • Do you omit the results in your presentation?
  • What other issues are related to this situation?
Can someone please briefly outline how they would approach these questions?
 
Does anyone have any advice for responding to questions such as: You are lost in an Asian country. What do you do?
Thanks (I know it is a bit vague - sorry!)
 

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ucatboy

Regular Member
Valued Member
Does anyone have any advice for responding to questions such as: You are lost in an Asian country. What do you do?
Thanks (I know it is a bit vague - sorry!)
Bruh what? Is this an actual interview question?
 

pi

Junior doctor
Administrator
Sounds like something similar to what I got asked in my JCU interview... Although I think mine was lost in a rural area.
 

Crow

Moderator Band 🦧
Moderator
Bruh what? Is this an actual interview question?
JCU definitely asks questions similar to this. The variation I got was “Describe a time when you’ve been in a new and unfamiliar environment, and how did you deal with it?” or something to that effect.
 
Can someone please briefly outline how they would approach these questions?
I'll give this a shot...
WWYD? I would first find a way to remove the published piece of work or indicate somehow that it is still unfinished work. I would then ascertain what piece of evidence it was that negated my hypothesis. How does it conflict with previous results? Is it the only time this particular outcome has presented? If so, why? Was it an issue with instrumentation or method? Who was performing these tests? I would say that if there was no evidence of anyone trying to manipulate the data or malfunction in the apparatus used or mistakes in method, then I would redirect the discussion to why the hypothesis was in invalid. Yes, it may be disheartening to have hours of work go down the drain but it may still inspire future research.
I would also address the issue of the supervisor publishing my work without consent, in a non-confrontational manner. What was their motive? Did they think they were doing me a favour by getting the research out there or were they trying to sabotage my career? Should they have known better to ask for consent? In either case, I would encourage them to speak to appropriate authority about the misconduct because it is still intellectual property that they published without my knowledge - regardless of if they were my supervisor or not. Now, they may not take lightly to this and so I would do my best to make them understand that I am looking out for academic integrity and trying to understand why they felt the need to publish the unfinished paper.

I may still attend the conference, seeing as it is in a month. If the time and resources permit, I would perform another round of testing (if I didn't conduct the last confirmatory tests in the first place) to ensure that the hypothesis is in fact invalidated. It would be degrading, in a way, to have such an outcome but I would be transparent about the results. It would be unethical to publish false claims, so I'd make the presentation about why or where it went wrong, and discuss the original purpose of the research had the hypothesis been valid. Definitely would highlight the importance of having protocol or procedures to prevent things like that from happening to other research teams.

There would be issues of use of resources and funding essentially 'going to waste', as well as the time of the research team (and test subjects, if they were part of the research) if the hypothesis was indeed invalid. I'm not certain what the procedures would but as a form of courtesy I would apologise for using up their time.
---------
Not really sure about the ins and outs, but I've tried to explore as many facets of the case as I could think of and the issue of academic integrity at the forefront of my answer. Feel free to add your own thoughts!
 
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H2.

Member
A doctor has smelt of alcohol many times in the past, you confront him about it and he tells you it just happened on one occaison and it won't happen again. Now, he smells of alcohol again, if you confront him about it now and he says he didn't consume it, the smell is his aftershave etc. What would you do?
 

H2.

Member
A doctor has smelt of alcohol many times in the past, you confront him about it and he tells you it just happened on one occaison and it won't happen again. Now, he smells of alcohol again, if you confront him about it now and he says he didn't consume it, the smell is his aftershave etc. What would you do?
Also are doctors supposed to be completely alcohol free? Because, I'm sure you can smell of it, while drinking sensible amounts.
 
JCU definitely asks questions similar to this. The variation I got was “Describe a time when you’ve been in a new and unfamiliar environment, and how did you deal with it?” or something to that effect.
Yep - they seem very common at JCU from what I have heard. Does anyone have any advice as how to approach this?
Thanks
 

whoartthou

Regular Member
Yep - they seem very common at JCU from what I have heard. Does anyone have any advice as how to approach this?
Thanks
You need to make it personal. There isn't a right way to answer this question as you can do multiple things to deal with it. It's really coming up with ideas and solutions to the situation. What you do is also based on the circumstances. I feel too often students think there is a set marking grid for questions when sometimes there isn't.

A doctor has smelt of alcohol many times in the past, you confront him about it and he tells you it just happened on one occaison and it won't happen again. Now, he smells of alcohol again, if you confront him about it now and he says he didn't consume it, the smell is his aftershave etc. What would you do?
Circumstantial again depending on the strength of your index of suspicion. If it is strong then you would report to the regulatory body and let them investigate. It could possibly be just aftershave in which case your report may damage the reputation or cause unecessary emotional distress for the doctor. You can speak to them directly to ascertain the situation further if necessary. Are there other signs of intoxication? Has there been errors made that is unusual? Are there other colleagues or people who have made complaints? etc. etc. Lots of things to discuss. I think it's a pretty easy question to answer.
 
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H2.

Member
Universities have moved away from these questions because at the end of the day it will help immensely if you had medical knowledge.
Whoartthou in that case, is it safe to say one would not receive "prioritisation questions" in an MMI?
 

whoartthou

Regular Member
A doctor has smelt of alcohol many times in the past, you confront him about it and he tells you it just happened on one occaison and it won't happen again. Now, he smells of alcohol again, if you confront him about it now and he says he didn't consume it, the smell is his aftershave etc. What would you do?
I haven't heard of them asking it in recent years in Australian university interviews.


I'll give this a shot...
WWYD? I would first find a way to remove the published piece of work or indicate somehow that it is still unfinished work. I would then ascertain what piece of evidence it was that negated my hypothesis. How does it conflict with previous results? Is it the only time this particular outcome has presented? If so, why? Was it an issue with instrumentation or method? Who was performing these tests? I would say that if there was no evidence of anyone trying to manipulate the data or malfunction in the apparatus used or mistakes in method, then I would redirect the discussion to why the hypothesis was in invalid. Yes, it may be disheartening to have hours of work go down the drain but it may still inspire future research.
I would also address the issue of the supervisor publishing my work without consent, in a non-confrontational manner. What was their motive? Did they think they were doing me a favour by getting the research out there or were they trying to sabotage my career? Should they have known better to ask for consent? In either case, I would encourage them to speak to appropriate authority about the misconduct because it is still intellectual property that they published without my knowledge - regardless of if they were my supervisor or not. Now, they may not take lightly to this and so I would do my best to make them understand that I am looking out for academic integrity and trying to understand why they felt the need to publish the unfinished paper.

I may still attend the conference, seeing as it is in a month. If the time and resources permit, I would perform another round of testing (if I didn't conduct the last confirmatory tests in the first place) to ensure that the hypothesis is in fact invalidated. It would be degrading, in a way, to have such an outcome but I would be transparent about the results. It would be unethical to publish false claims, so I'd make the presentation about why or where it went wrong, and discuss the original purpose of the research had the hypothesis been valid. Definitely would highlight the importance of having protocol or procedures to prevent things like that from happening to other research teams.

There would be issues of use of resources and funding essentially 'going to waste', as well as the time of the research team (and test subjects, if they were part of the research) if the hypothesis was indeed invalid. I'm not certain what the procedures would but as a form of courtesy I would apologise for using up their time.
---------
Not really sure about the ins and outs, but I've tried to explore as many facets of the case as I could think of and the issue of academic integrity at the forefront of my answer. Feel free to add your own thoughts!
I think the main issue here is publication of your results without consent and possible scientific misconduct. As a PHD student your supervisor is there to help with your queries but the research, results etc. are your own.

I think you asked valid questions but this question isn't really about you not getting the right results. This is an ethical dilemma in which some people might consider submitting or ignoring the results so they could publish and therefore, gain recognition for their work. There has been a few cases recently considered to be "scientific misconduct" and the most notorious being Andrew Wakefield linking vaccination to autism which has resulted in a ridiculous amount of harm done to public safety and health. You can mention this example as it directly relates to the question being asked. Integrity of scientific research is paramount here.

Most research actually do not support the hypothesis but it allows future research to learn meaning they might try a different method etc. It is important to understand research is never wasted and it should be published even if it doesn't support the hypothesis because you may help others down the line. I don't think there is a need to apologise, everyone knows the risks involved in research and this is how it is.

The bulk of your first answer probably wouldn't be scoring you any marks as it misses the key considerations. Luckily you address this later.
 
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H2.

Member
You head out bushwalking with a friend and your brother. You have only been bushwalking once before, and this would be your younger brother’s first time out in the bush. After wandering off the path for 30 minutes, your friend falls and breaks her leg. You are lost. No one knows you have gone bushwalking. What do you do? What would you bring with you if you were going bushwalking?

Can you expect any questions like these in an MMI?
This would be my plan, I'd attempt it if worthwile.
- I feel like the friend breaking the leg, what do you do? would involve medical knowlege to treat or help her. And you could probably ask a bunch of questions in the scenario like do you have a flare? map? etc.
With regards what to do after that, I would see if carrying the friend would be possible without harming her further, if not, I could maybe have younger brother stay put with her, while I retrace footprints/footsteps to find people and get medical help.
- What would you bring with you? I'd consult experienced bushwalkers before going on the trip to ensure I have the necessities and other resources required in a surivival or injury situaton.
 

whoartthou

Regular Member
You head out bushwalking with a friend and your brother. You have only been bushwalking once before, and this would be your younger brother’s first time out in the bush. After wandering off the path for 30 minutes, your friend falls and breaks her leg. You are lost. No one knows you have gone bushwalking. What do you do? What would you bring with you if you were going bushwalking?

Can you expect any questions like these in an MMI?
This would be my plan, I'd attempt it if worthwile.
- I feel like the friend breaking the leg, what do you do? would involve medical knowlege to treat or help her. And you could probably ask a bunch of questions in the scenario like do you have a flare? map? etc.
With regards what to do after that, I would see if carrying the friend would be possible without harming her further, if not, I could maybe have younger brother stay put with her, while I retrace footprints/footsteps to find people and get medical help.
- What would you bring with you? I'd consult experienced bushwalkers before going on the trip to ensure I have the necessities and other resources required in a surivival or injury situaton.
Yes I've seen this question before.

It's basically coming up with solutions to your predicament. As long as it makes logical sense it will be given a mark.

What would you bring with you if you were going bushwalking? You didn't answer the question. Therefore you will most likely get a 0 here.

LISTEN TO THE QUESTION! Given that this was typed out you should not have missed the answer. Given the interview is a high pressure and high stakes situation there is an increased likelihood of mishearing or misinterpreting the question.
 
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yoooo

Member
You are the chair of a school board and have recently been given money to erect a flag pole by a local community group. On announcing this to the school there is some disagreement about what kind of flag should be flown - Australian / Aboriginal / Torres Strait Islanders. Some people are stating there needs to be an Aboriginal flag for equal representation but others are saying there aren't enough people at the school to justify a Torres Strait flag. How would you approach this situation?
^^this is a scenario outlined earlier in this thread. I'm stuck on this scenario, how would you go about this one?
 

H2.

Member
Yes I've seen this question before.

It's basically coming up with solutions to your predicament. As long as it makes logical sense it will be given a mark.

What would you bring with you if you were going bushwalking? You didn't answer the question. Therefore you will most likely get a 0 here.

LISTEN TO THE QUESTION! Given that this was typed out you should not have missed the answer. Given the interview is a high pressure and high stakes situation there is an increased likelihood of mishearing or misinterpreting the question.
Do you by any chance have the opportunity to take the scenario with you into the interview?
 

Gav10

stats noob but not a weaboo
Do you by any chance have the opportunity to take the scenario with you into the interview?
Typically not. For Adelaide, I think they did for the 2nd panel. For WSU, they didn't, but they had a copy of the scenario for nearly all, if not all, stations inside anyway. For JMP, they had an outline of the station to read outside of the station, and then inside, you got the more specific scenario.
 

H2.

Member
Typically not. For Adelaide, I think they did for the 2nd panel. For WSU, they didn't, but they had a copy of the scenario for nearly all, if not all, stations inside anyway. For JMP, they had an outline of the station to read outside of the station, and then inside, you got the more specific scenario.
Thank you Gav, do you know what the case is for Monash?
 

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