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[2020 entry and beyond] Guide to Bonded Medical Places

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
Hello, if one finishes a bonded medical place away from their home state, are they able to complete their rural placements back in their homestate?
The bonded scheme is driven by the federal gov, it's not bound to the state where you study med.
 

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ChillX

Member
The bonded scheme is driven by the federal gov, it's not bound to the state where you study med.
Aah I see. Thank you. Does this forum happen to have a thread on 'life after med school'? Just want to get an idea of my chances going back to my home state if I do medicine interstate.
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
Aah I see. Thank you. Does this forum happen to have a thread on 'life after med school'? Just want to get an idea of my chances going back to my home state if I do medicine interstate.
Maybe this thread or similar? > Possibility of Interstate Internship/Residency?

Your chance of returning to home (Y12) state, as an intern, varies with different states. Fairly good chance for NSW & WA, reason being returning graduates are ranked only below local CSP+FFP who usually don't fill up all internships on offer (but your choice for a good location is slim). Pretty hopeless for Vic since you're ranked behind Vic int'l grads who sometimes cannot all get a spot. Equal chance in QLD since you're put in a pool with other interstate + int'l grads and selected on merit. I presume it's poor chance for SA since they have struggled to provide enough internships for their own CSP grads let alone anyone else.

Returning to home state after having done internship/JMO years in your grad state, I presume it's merit based.
 

ChillX

Member
Maybe this thread or similar? > Possibility of Interstate Internship/Residency?

Your chance of returning to home (Y12) state, as an intern, varies with different states. Fairly good chance for NSW & WA, reason being returning graduates are ranked only below local CSP+FFP who usually don't fill up all internships on offer (but your choice for a good location is slim). Pretty hopeless for Vic since you're ranked behind Vic int'l grads who sometimes cannot all get a spot. Equal chance in QLD since you're put in a pool with other interstate + int'l grads and selected on merit. I presume it's poor chance for SA since they have struggled to provide enough internships for their own CSP grads let alone anyone else.

Returning to home state after having done internship/JMO years in your grad state, I presume it's merit based.
Ooh yes, thanks for the link. I'll have a look at it. My home state is NSW.
 

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LMG!

Moderator
Staff Member of the Year 2019
Is it a bad look if I don't select to be considered for a BMP? I didn't, and now I am feeling incredibly bad and concerned that the administrators won't believe I am serious about wanting to be a doctor. I just don't believe that the RoS would be favourable compared to having no ties after medicine.
It won’t affect your eligibility for interview, and your interviewers are very very unlikely to know anything about the specifics of your application. I can’t see it being an issue at all.
 

chinaski

Regular Member
No, it's not a bad look. A bad look is being willing to accept any place, even if that place is something you personally would find untenable. It's also worth remembering that "administrators" and doctors don't idealise and stan over medicine the same way med school applicants do. We don't take the position that medicine is the best thing ever and that everyone should follow their dream, no matter what. A pragmatic, realistic candidate is actually what people are generally looking for.
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
Is it a bad look if I don't select to be considered for a BMP? I didn't, and now I am feeling incredibly bad and concerned that the administrators won't believe I am serious about wanting to be a doctor. I just don't believe that the RoS would be favourable compared to having no ties after medicine.
Notwithstanding LMG's & Chinaski's replies, myself I would still put BMP in. Having the option to later decline an offer is better than not getting the offer at all.
 

chinaski

Regular Member
Notwithstanding LMG's & Chinaski's replies, myself I would still put BMP in. Having the option to later decline an offer is better than not getting the offer at all.
If a bonded place is absolutely out of the question for a candidate, there's nothing to be gained from applying for a place they have every intention of declining if it were offered (aside from bragging rights?). On the flip side, a candidate who is more easily swayed or pressured may subsequently end up accepting a place they didn't want because of the "bird in the hand" phenomenon - which has potential to lead to regrets.
 

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Crow

Moderator Band 🦧
Moderator
Additionally, there is the possibility that if someone ticks yes for a BMP, they could then be offered a BMP at a university that is placed at a higher preference, when they actually could've landed a CSP at a lower preferenced university that they were also eligible for (which in the above situation, would probably be a preferred outcome to receiving a BMP for the higher preference). In this situation it'd be best not to apply for a BMP at all.
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
If a bonded place is absolutely out of the question for a candidate, there's nothing to be gained from applying for a place they have every intention of declining if it were offered (aside from bragging rights?). On the flip side, a candidate who is more easily swayed or pressured may subsequently end up accepting a place they didn't want because of the "bird in the hand" phenomenon - which has potential to lead to regrets.
I was more thinking about a case one or two years ago of a student who didn't choose BMP. Later on she got no offer anywhere and was 5th on the UNSW waiting list for an unbonded place (being 5th means she would have got a BMP offer). When UNSW upgraded several BMPs to unbonded which would have included her she wasn't called on because she wasn't on their BMP list.

Apart from that (and I don't wish to discuss the ethics of doing this), people have got out of their BMP contracts by paying back the CSP subsidies to the government. I would rather have flexible options available than no option.
 

Tomato

Regular Member
Additionally, there is the possibility that if someone ticks yes for a BMP, they could then be offered a BMP at a university that is placed at a higher preference, when they actually could've landed a CSP at a lower preferenced university that they were also eligible for (which in the above situation, would probably be a preferred outcome to receiving a BMP for the higher preference). In this situation it'd be best not to apply for a BMP at all.
Can you apply Uni A's unbonded as 1st preference, then Uni B's unbonded, and Uni A's bonded as 3rd and so on? In this way, you either get your preferred CSP or at least get a BMP place.
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
Can you apply Uni A's unbonded as 1st preference, then Uni B's unbonded, and Uni A's bonded as 3rd and so on? In this way, you either get your preferred CSP or at least get a BMP place.
It was like that a few years ago when UAC/TACs allowed separate unbonded & bonded entries for each school into your pref list. UAC gave 9 slots for prefs in my year iirc. Now that it's been cut down to 5 or 6 they have removed this option for most schools.
 

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Hello.
Are you sure you have to complete 3 years? Because on the Department of health website it says this:

Following successful completion of the medical course, participants who joined the BMP Scheme from 2016 agree to work in an Eligible Location in Australia for a total of 12 months, prior to, or within five (5) years of attaining fellowship. This work can take place from the date you become provisionally registered to five (5) years after you attain fellowship. However, once you have commenced your return of service period:
  • you have five (5) years in which to complete it;
  • you may undertake the twelve month return of service period in periods of no less than 12 consecutive weeks; and
  • you must work full-time.

Which seems like you have to complete only a year instead of 3. If I'm wrong, where did you get your information from?

Thank you
 

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LMG!

Moderator
Staff Member of the Year 2019
Hello.
Are you sure you have to complete 3 years? Because on the Department of health website it says this:

Following successful completion of the medical course, participants who joined the BMP Scheme from 2016 agree to work in an Eligible Location in Australia for a total of 12 months, prior to, or within five (5) years of attaining fellowship. This work can take place from the date you become provisionally registered to five (5) years after you attain fellowship. However, once you have commenced your return of service period:
  • you have five (5) years in which to complete it;
  • you may undertake the twelve month return of service period in periods of no less than 12 consecutive weeks; and
  • you must work full-time.

Which seems like you have to complete only a year instead of 3. If I'm wrong, where did you get your information from?

Thank you
This is for students from 2016 - 2019. There are new rules from 2020 (hence the title of this thread).
 

Crow

Moderator Band 🦧
Moderator
Hello.
Are you sure you have to complete 3 years? Because on the Department of health website it says this:

Following successful completion of the medical course, participants who joined the BMP Scheme from 2016 agree to work in an Eligible Location in Australia for a total of 12 months, prior to, or within five (5) years of attaining fellowship. This work can take place from the date you become provisionally registered to five (5) years after you attain fellowship. However, once you have commenced your return of service period:
  • you have five (5) years in which to complete it;
  • you may undertake the twelve month return of service period in periods of no less than 12 consecutive weeks; and
  • you must work full-time.

Which seems like you have to complete only a year instead of 3. If I'm wrong, where did you get your information from?

Thank you
This information is referring to the current scheme. The scheme is changing from 2020 onwards. https://www1.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/reformed-bonded-programs
 
Oh okay thank you for your replies.
I was confused because it said from 2016 onwards.
I was looking to apply for bonded because it seemed like it was for only a year but I'm not too sure now.

(Off topic content deleted)
 
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It seems like some universities have seperate course codes for bonded and non-bonded (e.g UWA)
If I put in a bonded place as a preference do I also need to put in non-bonded as a seperate preference to be considered for a non-bonded place first? Or am I automatically considered for a non-bonded place first?
And for unis that don't have different codes how do I show that I want to be considered for a bonded place?
And if I want to be considered for BMP am I considered for a non-bonded place first?
Thank you
 

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