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General Medicine Entry Discussion and Advice Requests

dotwingz

Irregular Member
Valued Member
1. It’s not so much of a bad idea, it’s just that it’s beneficial for only very few people, meanwhile your delaying progress in an alternate degree/career whilst betting on the outcome of a 2 hour UCAT test. Although some unis don’t let non year 12 applicants apply, so it kinda opens up doors.

2.Define Good. Would you enjoy being a physio? You have to be content with settling for an alternate career if you never make it into medicine, because it’s super competitive. Also depends how long your willing to spend at uni - a physio is a 4 year degree, so if you complete a physio then a med degree you’re talking 8 years at least, compared to a ~6 year undergrad path. Some people (including myself) don’t mind this as it’s really only a small increase compared to the full length of training. The GAMSAT pathway is fine, no different to the Undergrad pathway really.

3. not sure, I think ponyswordz did Physio so he might weigh in here

4. No one can really say. Some do better in university style of study whilst some prefer high school. Some are better and GAMSAT than UCAT. It’s kinda comparing apples to oranges. I know plenty of people who walked out of high school with low ATARs who did fantastic at uni and made it into stat heavy grad programs

5. Kinda, it’s more of a reapplication using GPA. Non standard Unis (UNSW, JMP, WSU, JCU, Bond, Adelaide if ur currently a UAdel student) will use your GPA instead of ATAR to consider, except for UNSW which combines your ATAR and GPA
 

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TKAO

oowah!
Valued Member
1. It’s not so much of a bad idea, it’s just that it’s beneficial for only very few people, meanwhile your delaying progress in an alternate degree/career whilst betting on the outcome of a 2 hour UCAT test. Although some unis don’t let non year 12 applicants apply, so it kinda opens up doors.

2.Define Good. Would you enjoy being a physio? You have to be content with settling for an alternate career if you never make it into medicine, because it’s super competitive. Also depends how long your willing to spend at uni - a physio is a 4 year degree, so if you complete a physio then a med degree you’re talking 8 years at least, compared to a ~6 year undergrad path. Some people (including myself) don’t mind this as it’s really only a small increase compared to the full length of training. The GAMSAT pathway is fine, no different to the Undergrad pathway really.

3. not sure, I think ponyswordz did Physio so he might weigh in here

4. No one can really say. Some do better in university style of study whilst some prefer high school. Some are better and GAMSAT than UCAT. It’s kinda comparing apples to oranges. I know plenty of people who walked out of high school with low ATARs who did fantastic at uni and made it into stat heavy grad programs

5. Kinda, it’s more of a reapplication using GPA. Non standard Unis (UNSW, JMP, WSU, JCU, Bond, Adelaide if ur currently a UAdel student) will use your GPA instead of ATAR to consider, except for UNSW which combines your ATAR and GPA
Just to add to the 5th point, curtin is also a nonstandard uni if you are a current curtin student much like UAdel, but I'm pretty sure they use WAM not gpa.
 

ponyswordz

Adelaide BDS (2020-2024)
1. It’s not so much of a bad idea, it’s just that it’s beneficial for only very few people, meanwhile your delaying progress in an alternate degree/career whilst betting on the outcome of a 2 hour UCAT test. Although some unis don’t let non year 12 applicants apply, so it kinda opens up doors.

2.Define Good. Would you enjoy being a physio? You have to be content with settling for an alternate career if you never make it into medicine, because it’s super competitive. Also depends how long your willing to spend at uni - a physio is a 4 year degree, so if you complete a physio then a med degree you’re talking 8 years at least, compared to a ~6 year undergrad path. Some people (including myself) don’t mind this as it’s really only a small increase compared to the full length of training. The GAMSAT pathway is fine, no different to the Undergrad pathway really.

3. not sure, I think ponyswordz did Physio so he might weigh in here

4. No one can really say. Some do better in university style of study whilst some prefer high school. Some are better and GAMSAT than UCAT. It’s kinda comparing apples to oranges. I know plenty of people who walked out of high school with low ATARs who did fantastic at uni and made it into stat heavy grad programs

5. Kinda, it’s more of a reapplication using GPA. Non standard Unis (UNSW, JMP, WSU, JCU, Bond, Adelaide if ur currently a UAdel student) will use your GPA instead of ATAR to consider, except for UNSW which combines your ATAR and GPA
Regarding the 3rd point, physio is a great career (at least IMO). You really get to embrace the physical human body which can be a great segway into providing context for the learnings that you do in med. There's a lot of physical interaction involved (compared with careers like science/medical science/arts/commerce/actuary/law-> afterall, physio, nursing, OT, dent & med, etc. are applied health sciences) so if you don't like using your hands to manipulate patient movements, physio is definitely not the pathway for you.

As for GPA, it depends. If you love physio applications like I did, you will find it much easier to get a higher GPA simply because I found that the content I learnt could be memorised more easily in less tries (I found the content relatable to actual practice -> unlike some aspects of extreme microbiology which would be covered in more detail within medical science courses). I ended up with 6.375 GPA last year which isn't the greatest by any means (yes, I spent a LOT of time gaming, youtubing & watching Twitch streamers whilst studying for semester 1, 2 & UCAT -> I did relatively well in the practical components but not as well in theory rote-learning -> if you share a similar passion and spend more time revising than me, you can definitely get a really good GPA).

Hope that helps l_quad
 
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cxl777

Member
Hey guys, I have a very general question about the requirements to become a doctor.
I was wondering whether individuals with chronic illnesses can still qualify as doctors (and ofc enter med schools)? I have a very mild immunodeficiency disorder (it's genetic). I was wondering whether that will affect my medicine journey at all? It hasn't affected my schooling at all and it just means I'm slightly more susceptible to illness/infections and things. In fact I think it's given me a clearer understanding of how the health system works and definitely more empathy towards patients 😅. This might be out of the scope (sorry) but any advice/info would be super helpful as I couldn't find anything online :p
 

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LMG!

Moderator
Staff Member of the Year 2019
Hey guys, I have a very general question about the requirements to become a doctor.
I was wondering whether individuals with chronic illnesses can still qualify as doctors (and ofc enter med schools)? I have a very mild immunodeficiency disorder (it's genetic). I was wondering whether that will affect my medicine journey at all? It hasn't affected my schooling at all and it just means I'm slightly more susceptible to illness/infections and things. In fact I think it's given me a clearer understanding of how the health system works and definitely more empathy towards patients 😅. This might be out of the scope (sorry) but any advice/info would be super helpful as I couldn't find anything online :p
This is very very unlikely to be a problem. For applications/interviews, etc, it will be a non-factor. If you receive an offer, then you may have to fill in a health form, and if it affects you having immunisations, the Uni will need to know that, too, but it doesn’t sound like it will affect your ability to complete the course requirements*, so it won’t be an issue.

And even if it did, the Uni would work with you to help overcome any factors as much as possible.

The key would just be staying on top of your health as much as possible so it doesn’t detract from the energy required to do Med + work + family + social life, etc.
 
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Hi, obviously at this stage and point in time this is really jumping the gun quite a bit, but I've read a lot on this forum about people getting offers by phone. This might sound like a stupid question, but what if you miss/don't pick up the phone call? You still get the offer right?
 

Crow

Moderator Band 🦧
Moderator
Hi, obviously at this stage and point in time this is really jumping the gun quite a bit, but I've read a lot on this forum about people getting offers by phone. This might sound like a stupid question, but what if you miss/don't pick up the phone call? You still get the offer right?
Yes (although if my memory serves correctly A1 did mention someone who got a very very late top up offer to one uni a few years ago, perhaps to ?JCU? and they were going down the list and if you didn’t answer they moved on to the next person). By and large phone call offers aren’t made by any uni other than JCU and they are courtesy calls rather than official place offers - the official offers come through QTAC. You really don’t need to worry about that.
 
Yes (although if my memory serves correctly A1 did mention someone who got a very very late top up offer to one uni a few years ago, perhaps to ?JCU? and they were going down the list and if you didn’t answer they moved on to the next person). By and large phone call offers aren’t made by any uni other than JCU and they are courtesy calls rather than official place offers - the official offers come through QTAC. You really don’t need to worry about that.
Alright, thank you very much, it's a relief to know that I don't really need to worry about that. I know a guy back in Hong Kong who missed several calls from his uni (not for medicine, for another course) 😬
 

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Hey guys, this might be a bit of a private subject, but for anyone who is willing to provide insight, that would be greatly appreciated.

For those of you moved interstate, how much on average do you guys spend/week? For accomdation, food, other expenses such as going out etc. I know mileage varies depending on state etc but any input would be great.

Also, if not too personal, who is funding this for you? If I were to move interstate, my parents assure me they will pay, but I feel incredibly guilty as it’s super expensive. What are your thoughts on this? I’m working part time at the moment trying to save as much as possible but this won’t be enough. What about when it comes to your own desires for like social events or clothing? Do you guys buy it yourself? I know these are silly questions but I keep thinking about them.

My parents both work at a very average rate and so I’m just feeling flustered at the moment
 

Crow

Moderator Band 🦧
Moderator
Hey guys, this might be a bit of a private subject, but for anyone who is willing to provide insight, that would be greatly appreciated.

For those of you moved interstate, how much on average do you guys spend/week? For accomdation, food, other expenses such as going out etc. I know mileage varies depending on state etc but any input would be great.

Also, if not too personal, who is funding this for you? If I were to move interstate, my parents assure me they will pay, but I feel incredibly guilty as it’s super expensive. What are your thoughts on this? I’m working part time at the moment trying to save as much as possible but this won’t be enough. What about when it comes to your own desires for like social events or clothing? Do you guys buy it yourself? I know these are silly questions but I keep thinking about them.

My parents both work at a very average rate and so I’m just feeling flustered at the moment
It seriously will vary majorly depending on the state - if you’re moving to Sydney you’re going to be paying way more than if you’re moving to QLD/WA/Tas etc.

It will also depend on whether you live in student accommodation ($$$), share house, apartment, proximity to uni, social expenses etc - if you want a better idea you’d need to be more specific with your potential situation I.e. where you’d be moving to, whether you’d live in a share house or not etc.

From my own observations, generally school-leavers who live out of home will have their parents fund most of their living expenses, but that’s not to say that it’s not completely do-able to support yourself with your own job. Myself and a bunch of other regulars on here work and fund our own living expenses and it’s very manageable with uni, so if you don’t want to rely on your parents, you shouldn’t have to.
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
Hey guys, this might be a bit of a private subject, but for anyone who is willing to provide insight, that would be greatly appreciated.

For those of you moved interstate, how much on average do you guys spend/week? For accomdation, food, other expenses such as going out etc. I know mileage varies depending on state etc but any input would be great.

Also, if not too personal, who is funding this for you? If I were to move interstate, my parents assure me they will pay, but I feel incredibly guilty as it’s super expensive. What are your thoughts on this? I’m working part time at the moment trying to save as much as possible but this won’t be enough. What about when it comes to your own desires for like social events or clothing? Do you guys buy it yourself? I know these are silly questions but I keep thinking about them.

My parents both work at a very average rate and so I’m just feeling flustered at the moment
Living expense is around $20k/year +/- $4k depending on how frugal you are.

If your parents' income/assets don't exceed the gov-set levels you are eligible for Youth Allowance, about $280 per week (including rent assistance) = $14.5k. The rest you work part-time or "borrow" from parents.
 

Moss

Member
Hi all!

Apologies moderators if this is in the wrong forum, and also in advance for the length of my enquiry, but I'm afraid its quite complex.

I am just writing with hopes that I can get some advice or clarification regarding my current circumstances and progression within/into medicine:

I am currently a 3rd year MedSci student at UNSW, and was very fortunate last year to be offered a Lateral Transfer position (commonwealth supported, unbonded). As I'm sure you're all aware, this is an internal transfer into the MD following completion of the bachelor of Medical Science and an Honours programme. However, it also requires that you achieve a minimum of 2nd class, 1st division (75% im told???) in said honours year to progress - that is to say that it is a conditional offer.

Last year, as to not put all my eggs in one basket, I also sat the GAMSAT (before finding out i got the Lat transfer) and thankfully fluked what i consider to be a good score. As such, post-grad entry to medicine also seems like it may be possible. This is especially so, considering that due to COVID-19, USYD medicine (my first preference) is not conducting interviews and instead only ranking applicants who pass the minimum GPA (which i do) by GAMSAT score.

So this ultimately brings me to my question:
Am i still eligible for post-grad medicine?; and would I be selfish to turn down the lateral transfer for the more secure* USYD post grad MD assuming I were to get an offer? Has anyone done this, or similar, in the past?
*Nb, i say more secure because it does not have the excluding conditions (ie, get 75+ in honours, which does sound obtainable through hard work, but you never know right?, im sure honours is very different to the last 3 years of my bachelor...)

Ofcourse, since applying I have contacted USYD's medical administration office with the same eligibility question. However, I am still awaiting a response (I am sure we can all appreciate they must be very busy rn).
I am only asking because, as far as I have read, USYD only excludes people from applying who are "currently enrolled in a medical program", and i am technically not 'enrolled' in UNSW's medical program via lateral entry untill i complete honours; I have only been given a conditional offer.




TL;DR: can someone in UNSW's Lateral transfer (a conditional offer) ditch to do postgrad med, and is it wrong to do so?

Any help at all with this matter would be greatly appreciated and I am thankful for any contribution.
(And again, sorry for the essay ahahahah 😂 , im just starting to get confused and anxious that i might somehow stuff up both 😬)

Sincerely,
Moss

(Atar= 96.95, WAM= 91, UCAT= 98, GAMSAT= 76, life=0)
 

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A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
TL;DR: can someone in UNSW's Lateral transfer (a conditional offer) ditch to do postgrad med, and is it wrong to do so?
Yes you certainly can do so and absolutely nothing wrong with it, plenty of undergrad applicants get multiple offers and ditch the less-suitable ones. In fact if you get a USyd offer and decline UNSW lateral, UNSW will offer it to another in your class and that person will forever be grateful to you.

Study-wise USyd MD would be a better choice anyway. You'd start MD1 med straightaway vs doing an Honours year before joining the UNSW med cohort.
 

Crow

Moderator Band 🦧
Moderator
Hi all!

Apologies moderators if this is in the wrong forum, and also in advance for the length of my enquiry, but I'm afraid its quite complex.

I am just writing with hopes that I can get some advice or clarification regarding my current circumstances and progression within/into medicine:

I am currently a 3rd year MedSci student at UNSW, and was very fortunate last year to be offered a Lateral Transfer position (commonwealth supported, unbonded). As I'm sure you're all aware, this is an internal transfer into the MD following completion of the bachelor of Medical Science and an Honours programme. However, it also requires that you achieve a minimum of 2nd class, 1st division (75% im told???) in said honours year to progress - that is to say that it is a conditional offer.

Last year, as to not put all my eggs in one basket, I also sat the GAMSAT (before finding out i got the Lat transfer) and thankfully fluked what i consider to be a good score. As such, post-grad entry to medicine also seems like it may be possible. This is especially so, considering that due to COVID-19, USYD medicine (my first preference) is not conducting interviews and instead only ranking applicants who pass the minimum GPA (which i do) by GAMSAT score.

So this ultimately brings me to my question:
Am i still eligible for post-grad medicine?; and would I be selfish to turn down the lateral transfer for the more secure* USYD post grad MD assuming I were to get an offer? Has anyone done this, or similar, in the past?
*Nb, i say more secure because it does not have the excluding conditions (ie, get 75+ in honours, which does sound obtainable through hard work, but you never know right?, im sure honours is very different to the last 3 years of my bachelor...)

Ofcourse, since applying I have contacted USYD's medical administration office with the same eligibility question. However, I am still awaiting a response (I am sure we can all appreciate they must be very busy rn).
I am only asking because, as far as I have read, USYD only excludes people from applying who are "currently enrolled in a medical program", and i am technically not 'enrolled' in UNSW's medical program via lateral entry untill i complete honours; I have only been given a conditional offer.




TL;DR: can someone in UNSW's Lateral transfer (a conditional offer) ditch to do postgrad med, and is it wrong to do so?

Any help at all with this matter would be greatly appreciated and I am thankful for any contribution.
(And again, sorry for the essay ahahahah 😂 , im just starting to get confused and anxious that i might somehow stuff up both 😬)

Sincerely,
Moss

(Atar= 96.95, WAM= 91, UCAT= 98, GAMSAT= 76, life=0)
As A1 says - by far USYD is the better choice here. Take it. There’s nothing to feel bad about by leaving UNSW behind - the place will just go to someone else.
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator

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LMG!

Moderator
Staff Member of the Year 2019
Thanks! I have a question; Flinders University is listed as provisional on the table, but I just checked their website and it doesn't mention anything about completing another undergrad degree beforehand? Am I misunderstanding what provisional means?
Flinders has both provisional and graduate entry. There is a 2 year bachelor degree prior to starting the 4 year Med component if you go via provisional entry. We have a dedicated Flinders Med thread if you have further questions.
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
Thanks! I have a question; Flinders University is listed as provisional on the table, but I just checked their website and it doesn't mention anything about completing another undergrad degree beforehand? Am I misunderstanding what provisional means?
Flinders does require you to do a 2-year accelerated undergrad degree at Flinders before entering the MD course. The website does not show it because the undergrad + MD may have been combined into a sequential two-degree course.

It's slightly different to other provisional unis where you can choose almost any undergrad degree (provided it meets any prereqs for the MD).
 
Yes you certainly can do so and absolutely nothing wrong with it, plenty of undergrad applicants get multiple offers and ditch the less-suitable ones. In fact if you get a USyd offer and decline UNSW lateral, UNSW will offer it to another in your class and that person will forever be grateful to you.

Study-wise USyd MD would be a better choice anyway. You'd start MD1 med straightaway vs doing an Honours year before joining the UNSW med cohort.
Hey I have unsw interview on 10 August could you guys pls advice what they look for what should I prepare for?
 

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