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General Medicine Entry Discussion and Advice Requests

Al.R

Lurker
I graduated with a doctorate in 2014 (having already graduated with bachelor and honours degrees before then) and received a med offer as a non-standard applicant in 2018... there's definitely huge scope for application eligibility via the non-standard route.
Some guy and LMG thanks for replies. Just one more question. When applying do they consider your most recent GPA? As my GPA from my previous degree is not that great.
 

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A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator

Some guy

Member
Some guy and LMG thanks for replies. Just one more question. When applying do they consider your most recent GPA? As my GPA from my previous degree is not that great.
Sadly I think it varies between universities, would be worth checking with them individually (but make sure they give their advice to you in writing, sometimes the uni chat line services or verbal advice turns out to be wrong).

I know last year WSU advised they looked at incomplete tertiary studies and ATAR together, and if either one was over the threshold then that met the hurdle. Dont know though what they'd think of completed degrees, and whether these weighted more than other later studies.

Edit: A1 knows better than me, follow the advice they linked above. :)
 

A1

Admissions Speculator
Moderator
I know last year WSU advised they looked at incomplete tertiary studies and ATAR together, and if either one was over the threshold then that met the hurdle.
This^ has been the case for WSU for many years, pre-graduate uni students can use either their ATAR or GPA to meet the hurdle. But once they have a completed degree ATAR can no longer be used.

If a uni student has done multiple study programs they will use the most recent provided it meets the minimum length required, which is 1 semester for WSU/JCU but 1 full year for JMP. This is so you cannot do just 1 or 2 units of a new degree and use it to displace the old GPA.
 

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Crow

Staff
Moderator
I just wanted to know what the latest dates were for first round interviews. Does it usually go past december 10 usually?
You will need to check the websites of the individual universities you are applying to +/- contact them directly if required.

The dates will vary widely depending on whether you’re a school leaver or non-standard, whether you’re an IB or ATAR recipient and whether you’re in-state/interstate/rural for the universities you’re applying to.
 

LMG!

Moderator
Staff Member of the Year 2019
What're the chances of getting an offer after interviews for WSU, UNSW and JMP?
Depends on too many factors to really make any meaningful comment.

JPM is, broadly speaking*, about 33%, and JMP about 25%, UNSW depends on individual UCAT and ATAR so impossible to give a figure applicable to the masses.

*Doesn’t take into account those that preference another uni higher and get that offer instead, thus reducing the starting pool. Those numbers are worst case scenario.

ETA: also doesn’t take into account those who interview but are then ruled ineligible on the basis of ATAR or GPA. This number could range from 0 to a small amount to a large amount, further highlighting the fact that the numbers aren’t all that meaningful.
 
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IQ ™

Member
Hey guys, I need some advice from you all! With interviews rolling out over the next two weeks the only realistic chance I have as a GWS is WSU, but even that looks hopeless for this year due to the results shifting up (shifting up the minimum threshold where last year I would've just made it). I'm considering reapplying for next year as I see myself having made progress towards Med with a much better score from 49 percentile in 2019 to about 91 percentile this year. My question is, if next year I apply for Medicine again and remain unsuccessful, to what point is it appropriate to continue for a fourth try? My parents bring up the idea that after three tries surely it's not meant to be. How would I respond to this logic? Is it something I should be ignoring or is it something that makes sense and that I should rethink my career path? Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks guys...
 

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Crow

Staff
Moderator
Hey guys, I need some advice from you all! With interviews rolling out over the next two weeks the only realistic chance I have as a GWS is WSU, but even that looks hopeless for this year due to the results shifting up (shifting up the minimum threshold where last year I would've just made it). I'm considering reapplying for next year as I see myself having made progress towards Med with a much better score from 49 percentile in 2019 to about 91 percentile this year. My question is, if next year I apply for Medicine again and remain unsuccessful, to what point is it appropriate to continue for a fourth try? My parents bring up the idea that after three tries surely it's not meant to be. How would I respond to this logic? Is it something I should be ignoring or is it something that makes sense and that I should rethink my career path? Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks guys...
My main reaction to this, is that there’s no right answer. Do what you feel is best for you. I can appreciate you may be under some parental pressures, but if at all possible, don’t let them influence your decision. If you want to keep trying, don’t let others stop you. If you’re ready to move on, that’s completely ok too.

My only advice would be to make sure you are working towards an alternative career path while you are trying, just in case medicine doesn’t work out for you.
 

dotwingz

Irregular Member
Valued Member
Disclaimer: Im only 18 years old so take my ""life advice"" with a grain of salt.

But as long as you're working towards an alternative career whilst reapplying it doesnt really matter how many times it takes to get in - it moreso matters what stage you are in a career that you consider it acceptable set yourself back to the bottom of the ladder in medicine.

If you were doing something like engineering as a backup for example, it would take you 4 years in university before you could even start working as an engineer, and after that you're still quite minor ranks for the first few years. In that scenario it totally makes sense so continue to applying for 6+ years (i.e. uni degree + a few years out) whilst you are still in junior ranks of your alternative career.

However if you're well into a career that you enjoy, are you really willing to drop everything to start again? Some are, some are not. This really is a personal question.

I don't think the three times and your out rule is a given, especially considering your improvement from 49 to 91. I would personally give the UCAT another shot next year, and grad entry a go after that. Although, this is entirely dependent on how different you consider your alternative career to medicine, and how far you are up that ladder if you decide to make a career change.
 

IQ ™

Member
My main reaction to this, is that there’s no right answer. Do what you feel is best for you. I can appreciate you may be under some parental pressures, but if at all possible, don’t let them influence your decision. If you want to keep trying, don’t let others stop you. If you’re ready to move on, that’s completely ok too.

My only advice would be to make sure you are working towards an alternative career path while you are trying, just in case medicine doesn’t work out for you.
I see, well next week everything should be decided really. Currently I'm doing Engineering/Commerce at UNSW so that's my backup plan. Thanks for the advice!


Disclaimer: Im only 18 years old so take my ""life advice"" with a grain of salt.

But as long as you're working towards an alternative career whilst reapplying it doesnt really matter how many times it takes to get in - it moreso matters what stage you are in a career that you consider it acceptable set yourself back to the bottom of the ladder in medicine.

If you were doing something like engineering as a backup for example, it would take you 4 years in university before you could even start working as an engineer, and after that you're still quite minor ranks for the first few years. In that scenario it totally makes sense so continue to applying for 6+ years (i.e. uni degree + a few years out) whilst you are still in junior ranks of your alternative career.

However if you're well into a career that you enjoy, are you really willing to drop everything to start again? Some are, some are not. This really is a personal question.

I don't think the three times and your out rule is a given, especially considering your improvement from 49 to 91. I would personally give the UCAT another shot next year, and grad entry a go after that. Although, this is entirely dependent on how different you consider your alternative career to medicine, and how far you are up that ladder if you decide to make a career change.
I never really looked at it that way, but wow that's changed my perspective on the whole thing in general. I know the weak points that was in my preparation for 2020 admission so if things don't work out next week I'll look forward to working for next years admission cycle. Thanks so much for the help, really appreciate it!
 
Hi all!

Apologies moderators if this is in the wrong forum, and also in advance for the length of my enquiry, but I'm afraid its quite complex.

I am just writing with hopes that I can get some advice or clarification regarding my current circumstances and progression within/into medicine:

I am currently a 3rd year MedSci student at UNSW, and was very fortunate last year to be offered a Lateral Transfer position (commonwealth supported, unbonded). As I'm sure you're all aware, this is an internal transfer into the MD following completion of the bachelor of Medical Science and an Honours programme. However, it also requires that you achieve a minimum of 2nd class, 1st division (75% im told???) in said honours year to progress - that is to say that it is a conditional offer.

Last year, as to not put all my eggs in one basket, I also sat the GAMSAT (before finding out i got the Lat transfer) and thankfully fluked what i consider to be a good score. As such, post-grad entry to medicine also seems like it may be possible. This is especially so, considering that due to COVID-19, USYD medicine (my first preference) is not conducting interviews and instead only ranking applicants who pass the minimum GPA (which i do) by GAMSAT score.

So this ultimately brings me to my question:
Am i still eligible for post-grad medicine?; and would I be selfish to turn down the lateral transfer for the more secure* USYD post grad MD assuming I were to get an offer? Has anyone done this, or similar, in the past?
*Nb, i say more secure because it does not have the excluding conditions (ie, get 75+ in honours, which does sound obtainable through hard work, but you never know right?, im sure honours is very different to the last 3 years of my bachelor...)

Ofcourse, since applying I have contacted USYD's medical administration office with the same eligibility question. However, I am still awaiting a response (I am sure we can all appreciate they must be very busy rn).
I am only asking because, as far as I have read, USYD only excludes people from applying who are "currently enrolled in a medical program", and i am technically not 'enrolled' in UNSW's medical program via lateral entry untill i complete honours; I have only been given a conditional offer.




TL;DR: can someone in UNSW's Lateral transfer (a conditional offer) ditch to do postgrad med, and is it wrong to do so?

Any help at all with this matter would be greatly appreciated and I am thankful for any contribution.
(And again, sorry for the essay ahahahah 😂 , im just starting to get confused and anxious that i might somehow stuff up both 😬)

Sincerely,
Moss

(Atar= 96.95, WAM= 91, UCAT= 98, GAMSAT= 76, life=0)

Hello, firstly congratulations on such amazing scores!!
sorry this is not related to your question but I'm a 2nd yr medsci student at UNSW applying for lateral this year and was curious if you knew the UCAT and WAM scores of both those who were offered interviews and those who actually got offered lateral spots. There is a lot of contradicting information at uni and as I'm sure you know as a fellow unsw medsci student the benchmarks are very unknown, some people say a 90+ wam and 95+ UCAT whilst others say an average of 83 (wam+ucat/2) is required for an interview offer. Thank you in advance!
 

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Crow

Staff
Moderator
does anyone know whether the defence scholarships only apply for CSP med places or also FFP?
I believe they also apply to FFPs, but they will only pay the amount that a CSP costs and you will have to pay the excess, if that makes sense. That means the likes of Bond, Macquarie and UniMelb are still very expensive but you can get a significant amount chopped off the fee. You might benefit from calling and enquiring about this officially - I have friends going down that path who have found them very helpful with any enquiries.
 
Hi guys
I've recently heard that even if you enrol in a bachelor's degree for a university, you can apply for med using ur ATAR (as ATAR is usable for 2 years) within the school leavers pool and NOT internal transfer? I'm not really sure how this works as universities state that to be considered as a school leaver, you must have not been enrolled in a bachelor's degree at any universities.
 

LMG!

Moderator
Staff Member of the Year 2019
Hi guys
I've recently heard that even if you enrol in a bachelor's degree for a university, you can apply for med using ur ATAR (as ATAR is usable for 2 years) within the school leavers pool and NOT internal transfer? I'm not really sure how this works as universities state that to be considered as a school leaver, you must have not been enrolled in a bachelor's degree at any universities.
Yeah, this is broadly incorrect. Once you have a tertiary record you’re a non-standard applicant, not a school leaver, and can only apply to undergrad unis that accept such students. We have whole threads dedicated to the topic so definitely have a read up if that’s part of your plan.
 

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